Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging
Radiological Society of North America
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Pulmonary Findings of COVID-19 Identified at Cardiac MRI
Volume: 2, Issue: 2
DOI 10.1148/ryct.2020200193
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Highlights

Notes

Kaiser Ururahy Nunes Fonseca, Chate, Neto, Ishikawa, Silva, Yokoo, and Szarf: Pulmonary Findings of COVID-19 Identified at Cardiac MRI
Images in a 33-year-old man who presented to the hospital with malaise and fever. Coronavirus disease 2019 was diagnosed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Chest CT scans acquired 5 days later due to clinical deterioration show patchy peripheral multilobar consolidation and ground-glass opacities (arrows in A, B). He also developed tachycardia and clinical concern for myocarditis, which prompted a cardiac MRI 2 days later. Although the study was negative for myocarditis, findings on black-blood single-shot fast spin-echo images (C, D) closely match those from CT and even show new opacities and more confluent consolidation (arrows), in addition to new perilobular opacities (arrowheads in C) suggestive of organizing pneumonia.
Figure 1:
Images in a 33-year-old man who presented to the hospital with malaise and fever. Coronavirus disease 2019 was diagnosed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Chest CT scans acquired 5 days later due to clinical deterioration show patchy peripheral multilobar consolidation and ground-glass opacities (arrows in A, B). He also developed tachycardia and clinical concern for myocarditis, which prompted a cardiac MRI 2 days later. Although the study was negative for myocarditis, findings on black-blood single-shot fast spin-echo images (C, D) closely match those from CT and even show new opacities and more confluent consolidation (arrows), in addition to new perilobular opacities (arrowheads in C) suggestive of organizing pneumonia.

A large proportion of individuals with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may be asymptomatic or have mild symptoms (1). Although MRI is not the method of choice for assessing pulmonary opacities, it is important to raise awareness about potential similarities between typical CT and MRI findings of COVID-19 pneumonia during this pandemic, especially in cases referred for myocarditis workup (2,3).

Notes

Disclosures of Conflicts of Interest: E.K.U.N.F. disclosed no relevant relationships. R.C.C. disclosed no relevant relationships. R.S.N. disclosed no relevant relationships. W.Y.I. disclosed no relevant relationships. M.M.d.A.S. disclosed no relevant relationships. P.Y. disclosed no relevant relationships. G.S. Activities related to the present article: disclosed no relevant relationships. Activities not related to the present article: disclosed money paid to author from Roche for lecture on lung cancer; disclosed money paid to author’s institution from Ministry of Health of Brazil for a project to develop a vendor-neutral archive and three initiatives in artificial intelligence (Zika, tuberculosis, and melanoma). Other relationships: disclosed no relevant relationships.

References

1. 

Inui S, Fujikawa A, Jitsu M, et al. . Chest CT Findings in Cases from the Cruise Ship “Diamond Princess” with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Radiol Cardiothorac Imaging 2020;2(2):, pp.e200110.

2. 

Syrjala H, Broas M, Ohtonen P, Jartti A, Pääkkö E. . Chest magnetic resonance imaging for pneumonia diagnosis in outpatients with lower respiratory tract infection. Eur Respir J 2017;49(1):, pp.1601303.

3. 

Ekinci A, Yücel Uçarkuş T, Okur A, Öztürk M, Doğan S. . MRI of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients: comparison with CT. Diagn Interv Radiol 2017;23(1):, pp.2228.

https://www.researchpad.co/tools/openurl?pubtype=article&doi=10.1148/ryct.2020200193&title=Pulmonary Findings of COVID-19 Identified at Cardiac MRI&author=Eduardo Kaiser Ururahy Nunes Fonseca,Rodrigo Caruso Chate,Roberto Sasdelli Neto,Walther Yoshiharu Ishikawa,Murilo Marques de Almeida Silva,Patricia Yokoo,Gilberto Szarf,&keyword=&subject=Images in Cardiothoracic Imaging,Pulmonary Imaging,