Journal of the Endocrine Society
Oxford University Press
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MON-043 Sleep Disturbances in Women with and Without Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and Their Association with Lifestyle Factors (Diet, Physical Activity and Sitting Time)
Volume: 4, Issue: Suppl 1
DOI 10.1210/jendso/bvaa046.093

Highlights

Notes

Abstract

Sleep disturbances in women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and their association with lifestyle factors (diet, physical activity and sitting time)

Bennett C1, Mansfield DR2, Mo L2, Hodge A3, Joham A4, 5, Cain SW6, Blumfield M1, Teede H4, 5, Moran LJ4

1. Be Active Sleep and Eat (BASE) Facility, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria

2. Monash Lung and Sleep, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria

3. Cancer Epidemiology Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria

4. Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria

5. Diabetes and Vascular Medicine Unit, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria

6. Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria

Sleep disturbances are a risk factor for poorer lifestyle behaviours. While PCOS is associated with a higher prevalence of sleep disturbances, the relationship between sleep and lifestyle behaviours is unknown in PCOS. Self-reported data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health young cohort (31–36 years, n=6067, n=464 PCOS, n=5603 non-PCOS) were collected on PCOS, anthropometry, physical activity, sedentary behaviour, diet (74-item validated food frequency questionnaire) and sleeping behaviour (sleep quantity and adverse sleep symptoms). Multivariate regression models controlled for sleeping behaviour, BMI, age, marital status, education, income and area of residence. Women with PCOS reported greater adverse sleep symptoms, higher energy intake, diet quality (dietary guidelines index (DGI)), fibre intake and sedentary time and lower glycaemic index, compared to women without PCOS. This was not maintained for energy intake and sedentary behaviour on adjustment for confounders. For diet quality, there was an interaction between PCOS and sleep disturbances. Only for women with fewer sleep disturbances (~8 hours sleep/no adverse sleep symptoms) was PCOS associated with better diet quality (DGI higher by 3.14±0.86, p<0.001), with no differences in diet quality for women with poorer sleep. Lifestyle behaviours in women with PCOS appear to be influenced by sleep quality and quantity.

Nothing to disclose: CB, DM, LM, AH, AJ, SC, MB, HT, LM

Bennett, Mansfield, Mo, Hodge, Joham, Cain, Blumfield, Teede, and Moran: MON-043 Sleep Disturbances in Women with and Without Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and Their Association with Lifestyle Factors (Diet, Physical Activity and Sitting Time)
https://www.researchpad.co/tools/openurl?pubtype=article&doi=10.1210/jendso/bvaa046.093&title=MON-043 Sleep Disturbances in Women with and Without Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and Their Association with Lifestyle Factors (Diet, Physical Activity and Sitting Time)&author=Christie Bennett,Darren Mansfield,Lin Mo,Allison Hodge,Anju Joham,Sean Cain,Michelle Blumfield,Helena Teede,Lisa J Moran,&keyword=&subject=Reproductive Endocrinology,Reproductive Endocrinology: Reproductive Function and Dysfunction on Development,AcademicSubjects/MED00250,