ResearchPad - 1302 https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Successful sparing approach between the ascending aorta and the main pulmonary artery to the giant coronary aneurysm of the left main coronary artery]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_9102 Coronary aneurysm located just above the left main coronary artery (LMT) is rare and difficult to treat. How the aneurysm is accessed is very important as it determines the result of the surgery. A 70-year-old man with a large coronary aneurysm (40 mm in diameter) in the LMT underwent surgery to prevent its rupture; however, there was severe adhesion. Initially, dissection of the ascending aorta or the pulmonary artery seemed necessary to access the aneurysm; however, the process was possible with limited dissection between the ascending aorta and the pulmonary artery, and we succeeded in firmly closing the LMT site of entry.

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<![CDATA[Jugular venous pulse in constrictive pericarditis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N1a899fca-ccca-4ace-85e7-fb3eb32056ed <![CDATA[Aortobronchial fistula and Listeria endograft infection after repeated T/EVAR: a rare combination]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N7c9e7f82-4344-4afb-aa92-26c777153ba0

Here we present a rare combination of aortobronchial fistula and Listeria endograft infection after repeat endovascular aortic repair. Device retention, debridement and negative pressure wound therapy, in combination with suppressive antimicrobial therapy, led to satisfactory control of infection until the patient died due to another complication. The combination of an aortobronchial fistula and Listeria endograft infection has never been described before. This present case should encourage and show clinicians the importance of an interdisciplinary approach in highly difficult clinical courses.

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<![CDATA[MASked-unconTrolled hypERtension management based on office BP or on ambulatory blood pressure measurement (MASTER) Study: a randomised controlled trial protocol]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c394655d5eed0c484a36d62

Introduction

Masked uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH) carries an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) complications and can be identified through combined use of office (O) and ambulatory (A) blood pressure (BP) monitoring (M) in treated patients. However, it is still debated whether the information carried by ABPM should be considered for MUCH management. Aim of the MASked-unconTrolled hypERtension management based on OBP or on ambulatory blood pressure measurement (MASTER) Study is to assess the impact on outcome of MUCH management based on OBPM or ABPM.

Methods and analysis

MASTER is a 4-year prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint investigation. A total of 1240 treated hypertensive patients from about 40 secondary care clinical centres worldwide will be included -upon confirming presence of MUCH (repeated on treatment OBP <140/90 mm Hg, and at least one of the following: daytime ABP ≥135/85 mm Hg; night-time ABP ≥120/70 mm Hg; 24 hour ABP ≥130/80 mm Hg), and will be randomised to a management strategy based on OBPM (group 1) or on ABPM (group 2). Patients in group 1 will have OBP measured at 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42 and 48 months and taken as a guide for treatment; ABPM will be performed at randomisation and at 12, 24, 36 and 48 months but will not be used to take treatment decisions. Patients randomised to group 2 will have ABPM performed at randomisation and all scheduled visits as a guide to antihypertensive treatment. The effects of MUCH management strategy based on ABPM or on OBPM on CV and renal intermediate outcomes (changing left ventricular mass and microalbuminuria, coprimary outcomes) at 1 year and on CV events at 4 years and on changes in BP-related variables will be assessed.

Ethics and dissemination

MASTER study protocol has received approval by the ethical review board of Istituto Auxologico Italiano. The procedures set out in this protocol are in accordance with principles of Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice guidelines. Results will be published in accordance with the CONSORT statement in a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

Trial registration number

NCT02804074; Pre-results.

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<![CDATA[Exploring the developmental tasks of emerging adults after paediatric heart transplantation: a cross-sectional case control study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c19b19bd5eed0c484c4d8df

Objective

Paediatric heart transplantation (PHTX) comprises 12% of all cardiac transplants and many of the children now survive into adulthood. Only a few studies have investigated the long-term psychosocial well-being of young adult patients after PHTX; no studies have investigated developmental tasks of emerging adulthood in different domains (family, social environment, education and profession, partnership, social environment).

Setting

Specialised heart centre in Germany.

Participants

Thirty-eight young adults aged 22.11 years (SD=4.7) who underwent PHTX and a control group of 46 participants with no known chronic diseases, aged 22.91 years (SD=1.8), participated in the study.

Outcome measures

All participants completed the following questionnaires: sociodemographic, the F-SozU, to measure perceived social support, the Gießener Beschwerde-Bogen to measure subjective complaints experienced by patients, the KIDSCREEN-27 to measure well-being and the SF-36 to measure health-related quality of life (QoL).

Results

‘Family’: the quality of the relationship with the parents was found to be equal in both groups, while PHTX patients stayed in closer spatial proximity to their parents. ‘Social environment’: PHTX patients reported lower social support by peers than the control group. ‘Education and profession’: PHTX patients most often worked full-time (23%), had no job and/or received a pension (21%). In comparison, most of the healthy controls did an apprenticeship (40%) and/or worked part time (32%). ‘Partnership’: fewer of the PHTX patients had a partner than the control group while relationship duration did not differ. In exploratory regression analyses, social support by peers predicted physical QoL, whereas physical complaints and the physical role predicted mental QoL in PHTX patients.

Conclusions

Our exploratory findings highlight important similarities and differences in specific developmental tasks between PHTX patients and healthy controls. Future studies should focus on developmental tasks of PHTX patients in this age group more systematically, investigating their role in physical and mental well-being in a confirmatory manner.

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<![CDATA[Randomised controlled trial of a Calcium Channel or Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor/Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Regime to Reduce Blood Pressure Variability following Ischaemic Stroke (CAARBS): a protocol for a feasibility study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c9e5667d5eed0c48423deab

Introduction

Raised blood pressure (BP) is common after stroke and is associated with a poor prognosis, yet trials of BP lowering in the immediate poststroke period have not demonstrated a benefit. One possible explanation for this may be that BP variability (BPV) rather than absolute levels predicts outcome, as BPV is increased after stroke and is associated with poor outcomes. Furthermore, there is evidence of distinct antihypertensive class effects on BPV despite similar BP-lowering effects. However, whether BPV in the immediate poststroke period is a therapeutic target has not been prospectively investigated.

The objectives of this trial are to assess the feasibility and safety of recruiting patients following an acute ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) to an interventional randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of two different antihypertensive drug classes on BPV. Secondary exploratory objectives are to assess if different therapeutic strategies have diverse effects on levels of BPV and if this has an impact on outcomes.

Methods

150 adult patients with first-ever ischaemic stroke or TIA who require antihypertensive therapy for secondary prevention will be recruited within 7 days of the event from stroke services across three sites. After baseline assessments they will be randomly assigned to treatment with a calcium channel blocker or ACE inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker-based regimen and followed up for a period of three months.

Ethics and dissemination

Ethical and regulatory approvals have been granted. Dissemination is planned via publication in peer-reviewed medical journals and presentation at relevant conferences.

Trial registration number

ISRCTN10853487.

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<![CDATA[Atrial Fibrillation Screen, Management And Guideline Recommended Therapy (AF SMART II) in the rural primary care setting: an implementation study protocol]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c19b151d5eed0c484c4c920

Introduction

Screening for atrial fibrillation (AF) in people ≥65 years is now recommended by guidelines and expert consensus. While AF is often asymptomatic, it is the most common heart arrhythmia and is associated with increased risk of stroke. Early identification and treatment with oral anticoagulants can substantially reduce stroke risk. The general practice setting is ideal for opportunistic screening and provides a natural pathway for treatment for those identified.

This study aims to investigate the feasibility of implementing screening for AF in rural general practice using novel electronic tools. It will assess whether screening will fit within an existing workflow to quickly and accurately identify AF, and will potentially inform a generalisable, scalable approach.

Methods and analysis

Screening with a smartphone ECG will be conducted by general practitioners and practice nurses in rural general practices in New South Wales, Australia for 3–4 months during 2018–2019. Up to 10 practices will be recruited, and we aim to screen 2000 patients aged ≥65 years. Practices will be given an electronic screening prompt and electronic decision support to guide evidence-based treatment for those with AF. De-identified data will be collected using a clinical audit tool and qualitative interviews will be conducted with selected practice staff. A process evaluation and cost-effectiveness analysis will also be undertaken. Outcomes include implementation success (proportion of eligible patients screened, fidelity to protocol), proportion of people screened identified with new AF and rates of treatment with anticoagulants and antiplatelets at baseline and completion. Results will be compared against an earlier metropolitan study and a ‘control’ dataset of practices.

Ethics and dissemination

Ethics approval was received from the University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee on 27 February 2018 (Project no.: 2017/1017). Results will be disseminated through various forums, including peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations.

Trial registration number

ACTRN12618000004268; Pre-results.

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<![CDATA[Burden of heart failure in Flemish general practices: a registry-based study in the Intego database]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c59e126d5eed0c484111832

Objectives

To assess the prevalence and incidence of heart failure (HF) stages A to C/D and their evolution over a 16-year period. Additionally, trends in comorbidities and cardiovascular (CV) treatment in patients with HF were studied in the same period.

Design

Registry-based study.

Setting

Primary care, Flanders, Belgium.

Participants

Data were obtained from Intego, a morbidity registration network in which 111 general practitioners of 48 practices collaborate. In the study period between 2000 and 2015, data from 165 796 unique patients aged 45 years and older were available.

Outcome measures

Prevalence and incidence were calculated for HF stage A, B and C/D by gender. Additionally, the trend in age-standardised prevalence and incidence rates between 2000 and 2015 was analysed with joint-point regression. The same model was used to study trends in comorbidity profiles in incident HF cases and trends in cardiovascular medication in prevalent HF cases.

Results

We found a downward trend in the incidence and prevalence of HF stage C/D in Flemish general practice between 2000 and 2015, whereas the prevalence and incidence of stage A and B increased. The burden of comorbidities in incident HF cases increased during the study period, as shown by an increasing disease count (p<0.001). The prescription of cardiovascular medication such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade, β-blockers and statins showed a sharp increase in the first part of the study period (2000–2008).

Conclusion

Age-standardised incidence and prevalence of HF stage C/D showed a slightly downward trend over the past 16 years, probably due to the sharp increase in cardiovascular treatment. However, the increasing age-standardised incidence and prevalence of stage A and B, as precursors of symptomatic HF, together with a rising comorbid burden, highlights the challenges we are still facing.

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