ResearchPad - 1527 https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Pericardial relapse of multiple myeloma]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_9099 In patients who experience relapse of multiple myeloma, upwards of 30% can have extramedullary disease. The presence of extramedullary multiple myeloma is typically associated with adverse cytogenetics and a poor prognosis. Organs most commonly involved include the liver, skin, central nervous system, pleural effusions, kidney, lymph nodes, and pancreas. We present the case of a 53-year-old man with IgA kappa multiple myeloma with the adverse cytogenetic findings of t(4;14) and 1q21 gain who had achieved a stringent complete (sCR) response after initial therapy with carfilzomib, lenalidomide and dexamethasone. Stringent complete response is defined as the normalization of the free light chain ratio in the serum and an absence of clonal cells in the bone marrow in additiion to criteria needed to achieve complete response. Prior to undergoing a planned autologous stem cell transplant, this patient experienced cardiac tamponade secondary to extramedullary relapse of his multiple myeloma which was limited to the pericardium. In response, his treatment regimen was transitioned to pomalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide for three cycles after which he again achieved sCR and ultimately underwent autologous stem cell transplant. Post-transplant consolidation therapy was administered in the form of pomalidomide, bortezomib and dexamethasone, followed by pomalidomide and bortezomib maintenance, which he has continued to receive for 3 years without evidence of disease progression.

]]>
<![CDATA[Delayed diagnosis of postcardiac injury syndrome]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c9e56f2d5eed0c48423ed4b

Postcardiac injury syndrome (PCIS) is a rare condition that is considered to have a trauma-induced autoimmune mechanism triggered by damage to pericardial and/or pleural tissues. We report a case of PCIS accompanied by systemic oedema after thymectomy. A 73-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for dyspnoea and oedema, 9 months after thymectomy. Evaluation revealed the presence of pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and systemic oedema. Differential diagnosis included constrictive pericarditis (secondary to tuberculosis), serositis caused by collagen disease and malignancy. Detailed investigations led to the diagnosis of PCIS, which was successfully treated with prednisolone. This report focuses on the diagnostic approach to PCIS. Since it took time to make a final diagnosis in our patient, we analysed several past case reports and series to determine the cause of the delay in diagnosis.

]]>
<![CDATA[Case of olmesartan-associated enteropathy and transient positive antitissue transglutaminase serology]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c394517d5eed0c484a307a1

Olmesartan-associated enteropathy (OAE) is increasingly being recognised as a major differential diagnosis in patients with villous atrophy and negative coeliac disease (CD) serology. OAE and positive coeliac markers have rarely been reported. We report a case of diarrhoea and small bowel villous blunting associated with a transient elevation of antitissue transglutaminase antibody (ATTG). On discontinuation of olmesartan, symptoms improved, repeat biopsies were normal and levels of ATTG also returned normal. We discuss a possible explanation for the transient elevation in ATTG and the significance of considering OAE/CD overlap.

]]>