ResearchPad - 1732 https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Foot health and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_12523 The aim of this study is to identify foot health factors related to the quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).SettingIn this cross-sectional study, a total of 293 subjects were analysed, 229 of whom were in the RA group and 64 in the control group. In the RA group, 173 patients were female, and 50 in the control group.ParticipantsPatients with foot pain and RA (according to the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism 2010 rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria) and with foot pain but no RA were recruited (Granada, Spain).InterventionTwo researchers independently interviewed the patients to obtain data for the study.Primary and secondary outcome measuresClinical data were obtained using the Short Form 12-Item questionnaire (quality of life) (primary outcome), Visual Analogue Scale for pain (VAS pain), the Manchester Foot Pain Disability Index (MFPDI) and the Foot Function Index (FFI). Anthropometric measurements were obtained using a foot measurement platform, the Foot Posture Index and the Manchester Scale of Hallux Valgus (secondary outcomes).ResultsOf the 293 subjects, 76.1% were female. Significant differences were observed between the RA and the control group (p<0.001) with regard to VAS pain (general, foot and hand), MFPDI and FFI. In terms of anthropometric measurements, significant differences were only recorded for midfoot and forefoot width (p=0.03). For the physical health component, multivariable linear regression with the parameters age, gender, VAS pain (general) and the presence of RA presented an R2 value of 48.8%, while for the mental health component the corresponding value was 5.6%.ConclusionMorphological and structural characteristics of the foot are not necessarily associated with pain, disability and loss of function. The presence of RA, a higher score on VAS pain (general), female gender and older age are all associated with the physical component of the quality of life of patients with RA. ]]> <![CDATA[Effect of vitamin D supplementation on pain and physical function in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA): an OA Trial Bank protocol for a systematic review and individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N69d382b2-83f5-4a2d-bb06-b07e1b4d9021 Observational data suggest that vitamin D deficiency is associated with the onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to date investigating the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in knee OA have reported conflicting results. Further research is needed to clarify the effects of vitamin D on patient-reported outcomes and determine whether there are patient subgroups who may benefit from the supplementation. The aim of this individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis is to identify patient-level predictors of treatment response to vitamin D supplementation on pain and physical function.Methods and analysisA systematic literature search will be conducted for RCTs of vitamin D supplementation on knee OA. Authors of original RCTs will be contacted to obtain the IPD. The primary outcomes will include long-term (≥12 months) pain and physical function. Secondary outcomes will include medium-term (≥6 months and <12 months) and short-term (<6 months) pain and physical function, as well as patient global assessment, quality of life and adverse events. Potential treatment effect modifiers to be examined in the subgroup analyses include age, gender, body mass index, baseline knee pain severity and physical function, baseline vitamin D level, radiographic stage, presence of bone marrow lesions on MRI, presence of clinical signs of local inflammation and concomitant depressive symptoms. Both one-step and two-step modelling methods will be used to determine the possible modifiable effect of each subgroup of interest.Ethics and disseminationResearch ethical or governance approval is exempt for this study as no new data are being collected. This study will be the first IPD meta-analysis to clarify the effect of vitamin D supplementation on clinical symptoms in different subgroups of patients with knee OA. The findings will be disseminated through peer-review publications and conference presentations.PROSPERO registration numberCRD42018107740. ]]> <![CDATA[Effect of tart cherry juice on risk of gout attacks: protocol for a randomised controlled trial]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Ne80e0725-ed04-4e92-acb9-fe4ead95ea03

Introduction

Gout is a painful form of inflammatory arthritis associated with several comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular disease. Cherries, which are rich in anti-inflammatory and antioxidative bioactive compounds, are proposed to be efficacious in preventing and treating gout, but recommendations to patients are conflicting. Cherry consumption has been demonstrated to lower serum urate levels and inflammation in several small studies. One observational case cross-over study reported that cherry consumption was associated with reduced risk of recurrent gout attacks. This preliminary evidence requires substantiation. The proposed randomised clinical trial aims to test the effect of consumption of tart cherry juice on risk of gout attacks.

Methods and analysis

This 12-month, parallel, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial will recruit 120 individuals (aged 18–80 years) with a clinical diagnosis of gout who have self-reported a gout flare in the previous year. Participants will be randomly assigned to an intervention group, which will receive Montmorency tart cherry juice daily for a 12-month period, or a corresponding placebo group, which will receive a cherry-flavoured placebo drink. The primary study outcome is change in frequency of self-reported gout attacks. Secondary outcome measures include attack intensity, serum urate concentration, fractional excretion of uric acid, biomarkers of inflammation, blood lipids and other markers of cardiovascular risk. Other secondary outcome measures will be changes in physical activity and functional status. Statistical analysis will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis.

Ethics and dissemination

This study has been granted ethical approval by the National Research Ethics Service, Yorkshire and The Humber—Leeds West Research Ethics Committee (ref: 18/SW/0262). Results of the trial will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

Trial registration number

NCT03621215.

]]>
<![CDATA[Behaviour change interventions for the management of Raynaud’s phenomenon: a systematic literature review]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c39461bd5eed0c484a359dc

Objectives

Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP) is a significant cause of morbidity. Vasodilator medications cause unwanted adverse effects, with behavioural and lifestyle changes forming the mainstay of self-management; this is difficult to implement successfully. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of behaviour change interventions for RP and identify learning points for future treatment development.

Design

Systematic literature review and narrative synthesis of findings.

Data sources

EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane and PsycINFO were searched for eligible studies on 22 August 2017.

Eligibility criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of behaviour change interventions with at least one control comparator arm.

Data extraction and synthesis

Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias were assessed independently by two reviewers, reaching consensus with a third when necessary. Primary outcomes of interest included severity/impact, frequency and duration of RP episodes, pain, disability, adverse events and study withdrawal.

Results

Of 638 articles retrieved, eight studies fulfilled criteria for inclusion. Biofeedback was the active behaviour change treatment arm for seven studies, with one study reporting a behavioural intervention. Studies were published 1978–2002; six were USA-based studies, one German and one Swedish. Using Cochrane Risk of Bias assessment, studies were assessed to be overall at high risk of bias, with the exception of one large RCT. The total sample included 495 participants (study median=29), with a median age of 39.5 years and preponderance towards females (73%). Five studies reported significant effects in primary outcomes of interest; however, due to missing data, relative efficacy of interventions could not be reliably assessed.

Conclusions

There is no evidence to support or refute claims of the efficacy of behaviour change interventions for the management of RP. There remains a strong case for developing and testing behaviour change interventions that focus on self-management; however, theoretical development and advancement in trial quality is imperative to underpin future work.

PROSPERO registration number

CRD42017049643.

]]>
<![CDATA[Long-term prognosis and quality of life in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis treated according to the 2015 ACR guideline (LELAND): protocol for a multicentre prospective observational study in Southern China]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c19b0f5d5eed0c484c4b664

Introduction

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic disease and one of the most disabling diseases for patients. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) issued a new guideline in 2015 for the treatment of RA based on the treat-to-target strategy to achieve better outcomes. This study will focus on the real-world rates of remission and low disease activity of patients with early RA in China, who will be treated according to the 2015 ACR guideline. Additionally, factors influencing treat-to-target outcomes will be analysed, and long-term prognosis and quality of life will be assessed.

Method and analysis

Two-hundred patients with early RA will be enrolled, treated and followed up once every 3 months for 48 months. These patients should fulfil the 2010 RA classification criteria of the ACR/European League Against Rheumatism with a disease course of no more than 6 months and should also fulfil other eligibility criteria. The patients will be treated following the 2015 ACR guideline. Their disease activity will be assessed, and they will be instructed to complete several questionnaires once every 3 months. The primary outcomes are the Disease Activity Score on 28 joints and Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index. The secondary outcome variables are the Simplified Disease Activity Index, Clinical Disease Activity Index and Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 results, imaging data and personal medical costs. The data will be analysed using appropriate statistical analyses.

Ethics and dissemination

This research was approved by the Nanfang Hospital Ethics Committee (NFEC-2017–192). The results of the study will be published in international peer-reviewed journals.

Trial registration number

NCT03508713; Pre-results.

]]>
<![CDATA[Facilitating and inhibiting factors for long-term involvement of patients at outcome conferences—lessons learnt from a decade of collaboration in OMERACT: a qualitative study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5acd5a44463d7e147ef094a3

Objective

Several studies have provided insights into the conditions for successful patient involvement in health research. We recently demonstrated that long-term engagement with people with rheumatic conditions in international outcome research led to significant changes in the research agenda in the field of rheumatology. This article explores facilitating and inhibiting factors for long-term involvement of patients as collaborative partners at five Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) conferences.

Design

Responsive evaluation, starting with a thematic document analysis of conference proceedings and the grey literature, followed by 38 qualitative interviews. Interview transcripts were subjected to inductive content analysis.

Setting

5 international OMERACT conferences between 2002 and 2012.

Participants

Patient delegates (n=16) and professional delegates representing researchers (n=14), pharmaceutical industry and regulators (n=2).

Results

Combined review of the document analysis and interview data revealed five main facilitators and three main barriers. Patient engagement as full participants at OMERACT conferences was enhanced by: strong leadership commitment and the presence of change agents, a clear selection procedure, an inclusive consensus-based conference design, individualised and self-organised support, an interactive and encouraging moderation style during discussion groups. Barriers were related to the intensity of the conference programme, scepticism among researchers and doubts about the representativeness of the patient group.

Conclusions

This study concludes that developing a sustainable structure for funding, selection and support of patient delegates, as well as adjusting conference design and moderation style, contributes not only towards facilitating direct dialogue between all stakeholders but also towards enhancing mutual understanding and the successful incorporation of the patient perspective in an outcome conference such as OMERACT.

]]>
<![CDATA[Shortening patient-reported outcome measures through optimal test assembly: application to the Social Appearance Anxiety Scale in the Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network Cohort]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c9e56b4d5eed0c48423e6f7

Objectives

The Social Appearance Anxiety Scale (SAAS) is a 16-item measure that assesses social anxiety in situations where appearance is evaluated. The objective was to use optimal test assembly (OTA) methods to develop and validate a short-form SAAS based on objective and reproducible criteria.

Design

This study was a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from adults enrolled in the Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network (SPIN) Cohort.

Setting

Adults in the SPIN Cohort in the present study were enrolled at 28 centres in Canada, the USA and the UK.

Participants

The SAAS was administered to 926 adults with scleroderma.

Primary and secondary measures

The SAAS, Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation II (BFNE II), Brief Satisfaction with Appearance Scale (Brief-SWAP), Patient Health Questionnaire-8 (PHQ8) and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale-6 (SIAS-6) were collected, as well as demographic characteristics.

Results

OTA methods identified a maximally informative shortened version for each possible form length between 1 and 15 items. The final shortened version was selected based on prespecified criteria for reliability, concurrent validity and statistically equivalent convergent validity with the BFNE II scale. A five-item short version was selected (SAAS-5). The SAAS-5 had a Cronbach’s α of 0.95 and had high concurrent validity with the full-length form (r=0.97). The correlation of the SAAS-5 with the BFNE II was 0.66, which was statistically equivalent to that of the full-length form. Furthermore, the correlation of the SAAS-5 with the two subscales of the Brief-SWAP, and the SIAS-6, were statistically equivalent to that of the full-length form.

Conclusions

OTA was an efficient method for shortening the full-length SAAS to create the SAAS-5.

]]>
<![CDATA[Anticipated significant work limitation in primary care consulters with osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5ba6ea7040307c4ae697c761

Objective

To describe the prevalence of expected work limitations (EWL) prior to future retirement age in osteoarthritis consulters, and the associated health, sociodemographic and workplace factors.

Design

Population-based prospective cohort study.

Setting

General practices in Staffordshire, England.

Participants

297 working adults aged 50–65, who had consulted primary care for osteoarthritis.

Outcome

EWL was defined using a single question, “Do you think joint pain will limit your ability to work before you reach 69 years old?”

Results

51 (17.2%) indicated that joint pain would not limit their ability to work until 69, 79 (26.6%) indicated EWL and 167 (56.2%) did not know if joint pain would limit work before 69. In bivariate analysis, physical function (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.91 to 0.96), depression (4.51; 1.81 to 11.3), cognitive symptom (3.84; 1.81 to 8.18), current smoker (2.75; 1.02 to 7.38), age (0.69; 0.58 to 0.82), physically demanding job (3.18; 1.50 to 6.72), no opportunities to retrain (3.01; 1.29 to 7.05) and work dissatisfaction (3.69; 1.43 to 9.49) were associated with EWL. The final multivariate model included physical function and age.

Conclusions

Only one in five osteoarthritis consulters expected that joint pain would not limit their work participation before 69 years of age. Given the expectation for people to work until they are older, the results highlight the increasing need for clinicians to include work participation in their consultation and implement strategies to address work loss/limitation. Targeting pain-related functional limitation and effective communication with employers to manage workplace issues could reduce EWL.

]]>
<![CDATA[Corticosteroids injections versus corticosteroids with hyaluronic acid injections in rhizarthrosis: the randomised multicentre RHIZ’ART trial study protocol]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c644649d5eed0c484c2b9e1

Introduction

Osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint affects approximately 10%–25% of women, especially those who are postmenopausal. It may result in thumb dysfunction. Among the treatments, intra-articular injections of corticosteroid (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) are both effective and recommended. However, clinical trials have shown that HA improves functional capacity, whereas CS only produces a decrease in pain. The synergy of these two drugs has not been evaluated. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether the association between HA and CS produce an additional decrease of more pain during thumb movement at three months postinjection, compared to the level of pain relief from CS alone.

Methods and analysis

RHIZ’ART is a prospective, multicentre, comparative, randomised, controlled, double-blind trial. Patients referred to the rheumatology department for thumb rhizarthrosis will receive an injection of betamethasone with HA or placebo (serum saline) based on central randomisation and stratification by centre. Injections will be given under ultrasound guidance. The primary outcome will compare the pain Visual Analogue Scale with motion at three months for both groups using a mixed model. The expected decrease in pain intensity in the CS group is 25% and 35% in the CS with HA group. In order to achieve a 80% power for detecting this difference with α set at 5%, 73 patients are needed in each group (146 total). The main secondary outcomes are the Cochin score (hand function) and grip strength. Follow-up visits are at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months.

Ethics and dissemination

The study project has been approved by the appropriate ethics committee (CPP île de France III, 2017-002298-20). In agreement with current French regulations, a signed informed written consent will be obtained from each patient. Results of the main trial and of the secondary endpoints will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

Trial registration number

NCT03431584.

]]>
<![CDATA[My life with lupus: contextual responses of African-American women with systemic lupus participating in a peer mentoring intervention to improve disease self-management]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c19afbdd5eed0c484c476e8

Objective

The current article seeks to examine the ways in which African-American women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) describe their disease experience and how they cope with their disease. This qualitative study provides deeper insight into whether experiences of African-American women with SLE differ from previous qualitative study findings.

Methods

Qualitative data were gathered using interviews and a focus group, from participants in the Peer Approaches to Lupus Self-management (PALS) programme. Data were analysed for themes related to disease experience and how participants cope with their disease. Twenty-seven African-American women with SLE were recruited into the peer mentoring programme, of which 7 served as mentors and 20 served as mentees. A 12-week peer mentoring intervention delivered by phone and based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management and Arthritis Self-Management Programs.

Results

Three categories encompassing a total of 10 subcategories emerged from analyses: (A) interpersonal, familialandromantic relationships; (B) individual experiences of living with SLE; and (C) physician–patient relationships.

Conclusion

We gained insight on several issues related to patient perspectives of African-American women with SLE, and the context surrounding their thoughts and feelings related to lupus, including their providers, families and other social support networks. Additional research efforts could explore and address the thematic domains and respective subthemes identified here. Although limited due to the preliminary nature of the study, this information can be used to create future evidence-based interventions to decrease the impact of SLE on African-American patients.

]]>
<![CDATA[A transient peak of infections during onset of rheumatoid arthritis: a 10-year prospective cohort study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5ba6e51640307c489cbf7a23

Objectives

The role of infection in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not been determined. We aimed to document the infectious burden and some aspects of antibacterial immunity in a large and prospective cohort study of RA patients in the early and late stages of the disease and in their relatives predisposed to RA.

Setting

Clinical and laboratory examination of all individuals enrolled in the study was performed in the Republican Clinical Hospital, Kazan, Russia.

Participants

376 patients with RA, 251 healthy first-degree relatives and 227 healthy controls without a family history of autoimmune disease (all females) were examined twice annually over more than 10 years.

Primary and secondary outcome measures

The following parameters were investigated: type, duration and frequency of infections, bacterial colonisation and serum levels of IgG to bacteria, serum levels of total Ig, plasma cytokine levels, granulocyte reactive oxygen species production, lysozyme activity and phagocytosis.

Results

There were no significant differences in infection rate between healthy controls (median 14 days/year) and RA patients (13). However, infection rates were higher (p<0.001) in healthy relatives (53) and early stage patients (62), which groups also showed heavy bacterial skin colonisation. In contrast, late stage patients had fewer infection days (12; p<0.001) than healthy controls, although bacterial colonisation was still heavy. Phagocyte function and antibacterial antibody generation, together with compensatory cytokine production, were observed to be subnormal in the healthy relatives as well as in RA patients.

Conclusions

We observed a marked increase in overall infections at the time of RA onset, and signs of a defective antibacterial defence mechanism, contrasting with fewer infections in the late RA stage. It can be speculated that frequent early infections initiate a compensatory immune hyper-reactivity which reduces the infection load while stimulating the development of RA in predisposed individuals.

]]>
<![CDATA[Can paramedics use FRAX (the WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) to help GPs improve future fracture risk in patients who fall? Protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5ba6ea6140307c4ae697c75a

Introduction

Currently identification, and therefore, management of patients at risk of osteoporotic fracture in the UK is suboptimal. As the majority of patients who fracture have fallen, it follows that people who fall can usefully be targeted in any programme that aims to reduce osteoporotic fracture. Targeting vulnerable patients who are likely to benefit from intervention may help shift the management of fracture prevention into primary care, away from emergency departments. Paramedics who attend to patients who have fallen may be well placed to assess future fracture risk, using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) and communicate that information directly to general practitioners (GPs).

Methods and analysis

This feasibility study takes the form of a pragmatic, randomised controlled trial aimed at exploring and refining issues of study design, recruitment, retention, sample size and acceptability preceding a large-scale study with fracture as the end point. Patients (aged >50) who fall, call an ambulance, are attended by a study paramedic and give verbal consent will be asked FRAX and fall questions. Patients who subsequently formally consent to participation will be randomised to control (usual care) or intervention groups. Intervention will constitute transmission of calculated future fracture risk to the patients’ GP with suitable, evidence-based recommendations for investigation or treatment. 3 months after the index fall, data (proportion of patients in each group undergoing investigation or starting new treatment, quality of life and health economic) will be collected and analysed using descriptive statistics. A nested qualitative study will explore issues of acceptability and study design with patients, paramedics and GPs.

Ethics and dissemination

This protocol was approved by NRES Committee South Central Oxford C in October 2012. Research Ethics Committee ref.12/SC/0604. The study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and local public events. A publication plan and authorship criteria have been preagreed.

Trial registration number

ISRCTN: 36245726.

]]>
<![CDATA[Scoping review of priority setting of research topics for musculoskeletal conditions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c39461fd5eed0c484a35ada

Objective

Describe research methods used in priority-setting exercises for musculoskeletal conditions and synthesise the priorities identified.

Design

Scoping review.

Setting and population

Studies that elicited the research priorities of patients/consumers, clinicians, researchers, policy-makers and/or funders for any musculoskeletal condition were included.

Methods and analysis

We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to November 2017 and the James Lind Alliance top 10 priorities, Cochrane Priority Setting Methods Group, and Cochrane Musculoskeletal and Back Groups review priority lists. The reported methods and research topics/questions identified were extracted, and a descriptive synthesis conducted.

Results

Forty-nine articles fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Methodologies and stakeholders varied widely (26 included a mix of clinicians, consumers and others, 16 included only clinicians, 6 included only consumers or patients and in 1 participants were unclear). Only two (4%) reported any explicit inclusion criteria for priorities. We identified 294 broad research priorities from 37 articles and 246 specific research questions from 17 articles, although only four (24%) of the latter listed questions in an actionable format. Research priorities for osteoarthritis were identified most often (n=7), followed by rheumatoid arthritis (n=4), osteoporosis (n=4) and back pain (n=4). Nearly half of both broad and specific research priorities were focused on treatment interventions (n=116 and 111, respectively), while few were economic (n=8, 2.7% broad and n=1, 0.4% specific), implementation (n=6, 2% broad and n=4, 1.6% specific) or health services and systems research (n=15, 5.1% broad and n=9, 3.7% specific) priorities.

Conclusions

While many research priority-setting studies in the musculoskeletal field have been performed, methodological limitations and lack of actionable research questions limit their usefulness. Future studies should ensure they conform to good priority-setting practice to ensure that the generated priorities are of maximum value.

PROSPERO registration number

CRD42017059250.

]]>
<![CDATA[Efficacy of bisphosphonates in specific knee osteoarthritis subpopulations: protocol for an OA Trial Bank systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c394640d5eed0c484a3662a

Introduction

Randomised clinical trials to date investigating the efficacy of bisphosphonates in knee osteoarthritis (OA) have found divergent results, with a recent meta-analysis finding no superiority of these drugs over placebo. Whether particular patient subgroups are more likely to benefit from this therapy than others is still unclear. We aim to investigate the effects of bisphosphonates compared with a control group (placebo, no treatment, another active treatment) on clinical and structural outcomes in specific knee OA subpopulations with possible distinct rates of subchondral bone turnover.

Methods and analysis

Medline, Embase, Scopus, Web of Sciences and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials will be searched from inception to February 2018. Randomised clinical trials will be eligible if they reported at least one potential treatment effect modifier at baseline: gender, menopausal status, age, body mass index, radiographic stage, knee pain severity, presence of bone marrow lesions, levels of biochemical markers of bone turnover (serum and/or urinary) and systemic bone mineral density status. Authors of original trials will be contacted to obtain individual patient data from each study. Risk of bias will be assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool. The primary outcomes will include pain and radiographic joint space width loss. Studies using other MRI-based assessment of disease progression will also be eligible. Outcomes will be grouped into short-term (≤3 months), intermediate-term (>3 months; ≤12 months) and long-term (>12 months). Regression models will be used, adding an interaction term for each subgroup of interest to determine possible subgroup effects. There was no source of funding for this study.

Ethics and dissemination

Dissemination of our findings is planned to occur through conference presentations, publication in peer-reviewed journals and social media. No formal ethics approval is generally required as no new data collection will be undertaken.

PROSPERO registration number

CRD42018093327.

]]>
<![CDATA[Prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis in relation to serum cadmium concentrations: cross-sectional study using Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c59e139d5eed0c484111964

Objectives

It has been suggested that exposure to heavy metal cadmium (Cd) may contribute to a high risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was to investigate the association of RA prevalence and serum concentrations of Cd and other heavy metals through large survey data analysis.

Design

A retrospective cross-sectional survey study.

Setting

Large population survey in Korea.

Participants

53 829 subjects participated in Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) from 2008 to 2013.

Interventions

Heavy metals were measured in different time periods of the survey programme which resulted in three different data sets for analysis: Cd, mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) from 2008 to 2012 survey; serum manganese (Mn) and urine arsenic (As) from 2008 to 2009 survey; and serum zinc (Zn) from 2010 survey. RA prevalence and its associations with serum heavy metals were analysed using a general linear/logistic regression model of complex sample design.

Results

Serum Cd was elevated in patients with RA (RA vs control: 1.30±0.07 µg/L vs 1.17±0.01 µg/L, p<0.01). There were no significant differences in urine levels of As or serum levels of Pb, Hg, Mn or Zn between patients with RA and controls. OR (95% CI) of RA prevalence according to 1 µg/L increase of serum Cd level was 1.28(95% CI 1.03 to 1.61). Prevalence of RA in women was increased with increasing quartiles of Cd levels, with a 19-fold difference in female RA prevalence between individuals in the lowest quartile of serum Cd level and those in the highest quartile (0.18% vs 3.42%). Cubic spline curve of prevalence OR showed increased risk of RA according to increased serum Cd level. Increased risk of RA in men was not observed with increased serum Cd levels.

Conclusion

There was an increased prevalence of RA in females associated with increased serum levels of Cd in the Korean population.

]]>
<![CDATA[Increased risk of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome: nationwide population-based cohort study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c9e56a5d5eed0c48423e57e

Objective

The aim of this study was to explore whether patients with Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) were susceptible to bisphosphonate (BP)-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) after tooth extraction in the entire population of Taiwan.

Design

A nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study.

Setting

Data were extracted from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD).

Methodology

Medical conditions for both the study and control group were categorised using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision. ORs and 95% CIs for associations between SS and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) were estimated using Cox regression.

Results

Overall, 13 398 patients diagnosed with SS were identified from the NHIRD. An additional 53 592 matched patients formed the control group. At the 3-year follow-up, patients with SS started to exhibit a significantly increased cumulative risk of developing BRONJ compared with that of patients without SS (log rank test <0.001). At the end of the follow-up period, patients with SS exhibited a significantly increased incidence of ONJ compared with that of the controls (0.08%vs0.03%, p=0.017). The Cox regression model showed that patients with SS also exhibited a significantly increased risk of developing BRONJ compared with that of the patients without SS (adjusted HR=7.869, 95% CI 3.235 to 19.141, p<0.001).

Conclusion

Patients with SS exhibit an increased risk of developing BRONJ after tooth extraction. BPs should be used with caution in patients with SS.

]]>