ResearchPad - Management of Technology and Innovation https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[A new geospatial overlay method for the analysis and visualization of spatial change patterns using object-oriented data modeling concepts]]> https://www.researchpad.co/product?articleinfo=5bc85de340307c1d3bc5c5b2 <![CDATA[How to compare movement? A review of physical movement similarity measures in geographic information science and beyond]]> https://www.researchpad.co/product?articleinfo=5bc85de940307c1d3bc5c5b4 <![CDATA[The GeoCitizen-approach: community-based spatial planning – an Ecuadorian case study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/product?articleinfo=5bc85ddf40307c1d3bc5c5b1 <![CDATA[Geo-located Twitter as proxy for global mobility patterns]]> https://www.researchpad.co/product?articleinfo=5bc85dd340307c1d3bc5c5ad <![CDATA[‘No Time to be Lost!’]]> https://www.researchpad.co/product?articleinfo=5b7d9348463d7e1c9cc87c1a

Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) remains a major cause of death and disability afflicting mostly young adult males and elderly people, resulting in high economic costs to society. Therapeutic approaches focus on reducing the risk on secondary brain injury. Specific ethical issues pertaining in clinical testing of pharmacological neuroprotective agents in TBI include the emergency nature of the research, the incapacity of the patients to informed consent before inclusion, short therapeutic time windows, and a risk-benefit ratio based on concept that in relation to the severity of the trauma, significant adverse side effects may be acceptable for possible beneficial treatments. Randomized controlled phase III trials investigating the safety and efficacy of agents in TBI with promising benefit, conducted in acute emergency situations with short therapeutic time windows, should allow randomization under deferred consent or waiver of consent. Making progress in knowledge of treatment in acute neurological and other intensive care conditions is only possible if national regulations and legislations allow waiver of consent or deferred consent for clinical trials.

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<![CDATA[INTEGRATION OF MENTAL HEALTH1]]> https://www.researchpad.co/product?articleinfo=5abd1f22463d7e6398006266 ]]> <![CDATA[Trust in Nanotechnology? On Trust as Analytical Tool in Social Research on Emerging Technologies]]> https://www.researchpad.co/product?articleinfo=5abb716a463d7e102df385af

Trust has become an important aspect of evaluating the relationship between lay public and technology implementation. Experiences have shown that a focus on trust provides a richer understanding of reasons for backlashes of technology in society than a mere focus of public understanding of risks and science communication. Therefore, trust is also widely used as a key concept for understanding and predicting trust or distrust in emerging technologies. But whereas trust broadens the scope for understanding established technologies with well-defined questions and controversies, it easily fails to do so with emerging technologies, where there are no shared questions, a lack of public familiarity with the technology in question, and a restricted understanding amongst social researchers as to where distrust is likely to arise and how and under which form the technology will actually be implemented. Rather contrary, ‘trust’ might sometimes even direct social research into fixed structures that makes it even more difficult for social research to provide socially robust knowledge. This article therefore suggests that if trust is to maintain its important role in evaluating emerging technologies, the approach has to be widened and initially focus not on people’s motivations for trust, but rather the object of trust it self, as to predicting how and where distrust might appear, how the object is established as an object of trust, and how it is established in relation with the public.

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