ResearchPad - actinic-keratosis https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Identification of differentially expressed genes in actinic keratosis samples treated with ingenol mebutate gel]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14730 Actinic keratosis is a common skin disease that may progress to invasive squamous cell carcinoma if left untreated. Ingenol mebutate has demonstrated efficacy in field treatment of actinic keratosis. However, molecular mechanisms on ingenol mebutate response are not yet fully understood. In this study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of actinic keratosis lesions before and after treatment with ingenol mebutate using microarray technology. Actinic keratoses on face/scalp of 15 immunocompetent patients were identified and evaluated after treatment with topical ingenol mebutate gel 0.015%, applied once daily for 3 consecutive days. Diagnostic and clearance of lesions was determined by clinical, dermoscopic, and reflectance confocal microscopy criteria. Lesional and non-lesional skin biopsies were subjected to gene expression analysis profiled by Affymetrix microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified, and enrichment analyses were performed using STRING database. At 8 weeks post-treatment, 60% of patients responded to ingenol mebutate therapy, achieving complete clearance in 40% of cases. A total of 128 differentially expressed genes were identified following treatment, and downregulated genes (114 of 128) revealed changes in pathways important to epidermal development, keratinocyte differentiation and cornification. In responder patients, 388 downregulated genes (of 450 differentially expressed genes) were also involved in development/differentiation of the epidermis, and immune system-related pathways, such as cytokine and interleukin signaling. Cluster analysis revealed two relevant clusters showing upregulated profile patterns in pre-treatment actinic keratoses of responders, as compared to non-responders. Again, differentially expressed genes were mainly associated with cornification, keratinization and keratinocyte differentiation. Overall, the present study provides insight into the gene expression profile of actinic keratoses after treatment with ingenol mebutate, as well as identification of genetic signatures that could predict treatment response.

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<![CDATA[Cyclic Dipeptide Shuttles as a Novel Skin Penetration Enhancement Approach: Preliminary Evaluation with Diclofenac]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db1fab0ee8fa60bcee63

This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a peptide shuttle in delivering diclofenac into and through human epidermis. Diclofenac was conjugated to a novel phenylalanyl-N-methyl-naphthalenylalanine-derived diketopiperazine (DKP) shuttle and to TAT (a classical cell penetrating peptide), and topically applied to human epidermis in vitro. DKP and TAT effectively permeated into and through human epidermis. When conjugated to diclofenac, both DKP and TAT enhanced delivery into and through human epidermis, though DKP was significantly more effective. Penetration of diclofenac through human epidermis (to receptor) was increased by conjugation to the peptide shuttle and cell penetrating peptide with enhancement of 6x by DKP-diclofenac and 3x by TAT-diclofenac. In addition, the amount of diclofenac retained within the epidermis was significantly increased by peptide conjugation. COX-2 inhibition activity of diclofenac was retained when conjugated to DKP. Our study suggests that the peptide shuttle approach may offer a new strategy for targeted delivery of small therapeutic and diagnostic molecules to the skin.

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<![CDATA[Quantitative Analysis of Viral Load per Haploid Genome Revealed the Different Biological Features of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Infection in Skin Tumor]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db1aab0ee8fa60bcdec3

Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has recently been identified in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), an aggressive cancer that occurs in sun-exposed skin. Conventional technologies, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry, have produced conflicting results for MCPyV infections in non-MCC tumors. Therefore, we performed quantitative analyses of the MCPyV copy number in various skin tumor tissues, including MCC (n = 9) and other sun exposure-related skin tumors (basal cell carcinoma [BCC, n = 45], actinic keratosis [AK, n = 52], Bowen’s disease [n = 34], seborrheic keratosis [n = 5], primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma [n = 5], malignant melanoma [n = 5], and melanocytic nevus [n = 6]). In a conventional PCR analysis, MCPyV DNA was detected in MCC (9 cases; 100%), BCC (1 case; 2%), and AK (3 cases; 6%). We then used digital PCR technology to estimate the absolute viral copy number per haploid human genome in these tissues. The viral copy number per haploid genome was estimated to be around 1 in most MCC tissues, and there were marked differences between the MCC (0.119–42.8) and AK (0.02–0.07) groups. PCR-positive BCC tissue showed a similar viral load as MCC tissue (0.662). Immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal antibody against the MCPyV T antigen (CM2B4) demonstrated positive nuclear localization in most of the high-viral-load tumor groups (8 of 9 MCC and 1 BCC), but not in the low-viral-load or PCR-negative tumor groups. These results demonstrated that MCPyV infection is possibly involved in a minority of sun-exposed skin tumors, including BCC and AK, and that these tumors display different modes of infection.

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