ResearchPad - aging https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[The influence of spouses and their driving roles in self-regulation: A qualitative exploration of driving reduction and cessation practices amongst married older adults]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14735 There is growing evidence to suggest the importance of self-regulatory practices amongst older adults to sustain mobility. However, the decision to self-regulate driving is a complex interplay between an individual’s preference and the influence of their social networks including spouse. To our best knowledge, the influence of an older adult’s spouse on their decisions during driving transition has not been explored.Materials and methodsThis qualitative descriptive study was conducted amongst married older adults aged 60 years and above. All interview responses were transcribed verbatim and examined using thematic approach and interpretative description method.ResultsA total of 11 married couples were interviewed. Three major themes emerged: [1] Our roles in driving; [2] Challenges to continue driving; and, [3] Our driving strategies to ensure continued driving. Older couples adopted driving strategies and regulated their driving patterns to ensure they continued to drive safely. Male partners often took the active driving role as the principal drivers, while the females adopted a more passive role, including being the passenger to accompany the principal drivers or becoming the co-driver to help in navigation. Other coping strategies include sharing the driving duties as well as using public transportation or mixed mode transportation.DiscussionOur findings suggest spouse play a significant role in their partners’ decision to self-regulate driving. This underscores a need to recognise the importance of interdependency amongst couples and its impact on their driving decisions and outcomes. ]]> <![CDATA[Cultural aging stereotypes in European Countries: Are they a risk to Active Aging?]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14695 A growing body of literature acknowledges the association between negative stereotypes and individual components of active aging, but very few studies have tested this association, at both individual and population levels. The Stereotypes Content Model (SCM) states that the cultural aging stereotyping of higher warmth than competence (called paternalistic or ambivalent prejudice) is universal. Our aims in this study are to test the extent to which the universality of this stereotype is confirmed in European Countries as well as how far "positive", "negative" or "ambivalent" views towards older people, and other negative attitudes such as prejudice and behaviours such as discrimination, predict active aging assessed both at individual and population levels. We have analyzed data from the European Social Survey-2008 (ESS-2008), containing SCM stereotypical and other appraisal items (such as direct prejudice and perceived discrimination) about adults aged over-70 from 29 European countries. First, SCM cultural stereotypes about older adults (“friendly”, “competent”, and “ambivalent”) were calculated; secondly, after developing a typology of countries based on their “negative”, “ambivalent” and “positive” views about older adults, the universality of cultural stereotypes was tested; thirdly, taking into consideration ESS data of those older persons (over 70s) who self-reported indicators of active aging (health, happiness, satisfaction and social participation), multilevel analyses were performed, taking our inter-individual measure of active aging as dependent variable and our stereotypical classification (positive/negative/ambivalent), direct prejudice and perceived discrimination as predictors; finally, relationships between stereotypical and appraisal items on older adults were examined at population level with country data from Active Aging Indexes. Our results show cultural stereotypes about older people (more friendly than competent) are widespread in most European countries, and negative cultural views of older adults are negatively associated with active aging both at individual and population level, supporting that negative cultural views of older adults could be considered as a threat to active aging.

]]>
<![CDATA[Effect of aging and body characteristics on facial sexual dimorphism in the Caucasian Population]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14542 The aim of this study was to quantify gender-specific facial characteristics in younger and older adults and to determine how aging and body characteristics, such as height and body-mass index (BMI), influence facial sexual dimorphism.MethodsThe cohort study included 90 younger adults of Caucasian origin (average age of 45 females 23.2 ± 1.9 and 45 males 23.7 ± 2.4 years) and 90 older adults (average age of 49 females 78.1 ± 8.1 and 41 males 74.5 ± 7.7 years). Three-dimensional facial scans were performed with an Artec MHT 3D scanner. The data were analyzed using the software package Rapidform®. The parameters to evaluate facial symmetry, height, width, profile, facial shape, nose, eyes and mouth characteristics were determined based on 39 facial landmarks. Student’s t-test was used to calculate the statistical differences between the genders in the younger and older adults and a multiple-linear-regression analysis was used to evaluate the impact of gender, age, body-mass index and body height.ResultsWe found that the female faces were more symmetrical than the male faces, and this was statistically significant in the older adults. The female facial shape was more rounded and their faces were smaller, after normalizing for body size. The males had wider mouths, longer upper lips, larger noses and more prominent lower foreheads. Surprisingly, we found that all the gender-dependent characteristics were even more pronounced in the older adults. Increased facial asymmetry, decreased facial convexity, increased forehead angle, narrower vermilions and longer inter-eye distances occurred in both genders during aging. An increased BMI was associated with wider faces, more concave facial profiles and wider noses, while greater body height correlated with increased facial heights and wider mouths.ConclusionFacial sexual dimorphism was confirmed by multiple parameters in our study, while the differences between the genders were more pronounced in the older adults. ]]> <![CDATA[Promoting healthy aging: intervening with diet, drugs, or exercise]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14072 <![CDATA[Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the trail-making test in older adults]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13819 The trail-making test (TMT) is a popular neuropsychological test, which is used extensively to measure cognitive impairment associated with neurodegenerative disorders in older adults. Behavioural performance on the TMT has been investigated in older populations, but there is limited research on task-related brain activity in older adults. The current study administered a naturalistic version of the TMT to a healthy older-aged population in an MRI environment using a novel, MRI-compatible tablet. Functional MRI was conducted during task completion, allowing characterization of the brain activity associated with the TMT. Performance on the TMT was evaluated using number of errors and seconds per completion of each link. Results are reported for 36 cognitively healthy older adults between the ages of 52 and 85. Task-related activation was observed in extensive regions of the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes as well as key motor areas. Increased age was associated with reduced brain activity and worse task performance. Specifically, older age was correlated with decreased task-related activity in the bilateral occipital, temporal and parietal lobes. These results suggest that healthy older aging significantly affects brain function during the TMT, which consequently may result in performance decrements. The current study reveals the brain activation patterns underlying TMT performance in a healthy older aging population, which functions as an important, clinically-relevant control to compare to pathological aging in future investigations.

]]>
<![CDATA[Neuropeptide Y Enhances Progerin Clearance and Ameliorates the Senescent Phenotype of Human Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_10134 Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, or classical progeria) is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by premature aging, and caused by a de novo point mutation (C608G) within the lamin A/C gene (LMNA), producing an abnormal lamin A protein, termed progerin. Accumulation of progerin causes nuclear abnormalities and cell cycle arrest ultimately leading to cellular senescence. Autophagy impairment is a hallmark of cellular aging, and the rescue of this proteostasis mechanism delays aging progression in HGPS cells. We have previously shown that the endogenous Neuropeptide Y (NPY) increases autophagy in hypothalamus, a brain area already identified as a central regulator of whole-body aging. We also showed that NPY mediates caloric restriction-induced autophagy. These results are in accordance with other studies suggesting that NPY may act as a caloric restriction mimetic and plays a role as a lifespan and aging regulator. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to investigate if NPY could delay HGPS premature aging phenotype. Herein, we report that NPY increases autophagic flux and progerin clearance in primary cultures of human dermal fibroblasts from HGPS patients. NPY also rescues nuclear morphology and decreases the number of dysmorphic nuclei, a hallmark of HGPS cells. In addition, NPY decreases other hallmarks of aging as DNA damage and cellular senescence. Altogether, these results show that NPY rescues several hallmarks of cellular aging in HGPS cells, suggesting that NPY can be considered a promising strategy to delay or block the premature aging of HGPS.

]]>
<![CDATA[Allele-Specific Transcript Abundance: A Pilot Study in Healthy Centenarians]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_10132 The genetic basis of healthy aging and longevity remains largely unexplained. One hypothesis as to why long-lived individuals do not appear to have a lower number of common-complex disease variants, is that despite carrying risk variants, they express disease-linked alleles at a lower level than the wild-type alleles. Allele-specific abundance (ASA) is the different transcript abundance of the two haplotypes of a diploid individual. We sequenced the transcriptomes of four healthy centenarians and four mid-life controls. CIBERSORT was used to estimate blood cell fractions: neutrophils were the most abundant source of RNA, followed by CD8+ T cells, resting NK cells, and monocytes. ASA variants were more common in noncoding than coding regions. Centenarians and controls had a comparable distribution of ASA variants by predicted effect, and we did not observe an overall bias in expression toward major or minor alleles. Immune pathways were most highly represented among the gene set that showed ASA. Although we found evidence of ASA in disease-associated genes and transcription factors, we did not observe any differences in the pattern of expression between centenarians and controls in this small pilot study.

]]>
<![CDATA[Glutathione Serum Levels and Rate of Multimorbidity Development in Older Adults]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_10131 We aimed to investigate the association between baseline levels of total serum glutathione (tGSH) and rate of chronic disease accumulation over time. The study population (n = 2,596) was derived from a population-based longitudinal study on ≥60-year-olds living in Stockholm. Participants were clinically assessed at baseline, 3- and 6-year follow-ups. Multimorbidity was measured as the number of chronic conditions from a previously built list of 60 diseases. Linear mixed models were applied to analyze the association between baseline tGSH levels and the rate of multimorbidity development over 6 years. We found that at baseline, participants with ≥4 diseases had lower tGSH levels than participants with no chronic conditions (3.3 vs 3.6 µmol/L; p < .001). At follow-up, baseline levels of tGSH were inversely associated with the rate of multimorbidity development (β * time: −0.044, p < .001) after adjusting for age, sex, education, levels of serum creatinine, C-reactive protein, albumin, body mass index, smoking, and time of dropout or death. In conclusion, serum levels of tGSH are inversely associated with multimorbidity development; the association exists above and beyond the link between tGSH and specific chronic conditions. Our findings support the hypothesis that tGSH is a biomarker of multisystem dysregulation that eventually leads to multimorbidity.

]]>
<![CDATA[Redox signalling and ageing: insights from <i>Drosophila</i>]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_9185 Ageing and age-related diseases are major challenges for the social, economic and healthcare systems of our society. Amongst many theories, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated as a driver of the ageing process. As by-products of aerobic metabolism, ROS are able to randomly oxidise macromolecules, causing intracellular damage that accumulates over time and ultimately leads to dysfunction and cell death. However, the genetic overexpression of enzymes involved in the detoxification of ROS or treatment with antioxidants did not generally extend lifespan, prompting a re-evaluation of the causal role for ROS in ageing. More recently, ROS have emerged as key players in normal cellular signalling by oxidising redox-sensitive cysteine residues within proteins. Therefore, while high levels of ROS may be harmful and induce oxidative stress, low levels of ROS may actually be beneficial as mediators of redox signalling. In this context, enhancing ROS production in model organisms can extend lifespan, with biological effects dependent on the site, levels, and specific species of ROS. In this review, we examine the role of ROS in ageing, with a particular focus on the importance of the fruit fly Drosophila as a powerful model system to study redox processes in vivo.

]]>
<![CDATA[Cross-talk between redox signalling and protein aggregation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_9183 It is well established that both an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS: i.e. O2•−, H2O2 and OH), as well as protein aggregation, accompany ageing and proteinopathies such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is far from clear whether there is a causal relation between the two. This review describes how protein aggregation can be affected both by redox signalling (downstream of H2O2), as well as by ROS-induced damage, and aims to give an overview of the current knowledge of how redox signalling affects protein aggregation and vice versa. Redox signalling has been shown to play roles in almost every step of protein aggregation and amyloid formation, from aggregation initiation to the rapid oligomerization of large amyloids, which tend to be less toxic than oligomeric prefibrillar aggregates. We explore the hypothesis that age-associated elevated ROS production could be part of a redox signalling-dependent-stress response in an attempt to curb protein aggregation and minimize toxicity.

]]>
<![CDATA[Creating an Age-Friendly Public Health System]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_8823 The public health system in America—at all levels—has relatively few specialized initiatives that prioritize the health and well-being of older adults. And when public health does address the needs of older adults, it is often as an afterthought. In consultation with leaders in public health, health care, and aging, an innovative Framework for an Age-Friendly Public Health System (Framework) was developed outlining roles that public health could fulfill, in collaboration with aging services, to address the challenges and opportunities of an aging society.Research Design and MethodsWith leadership from Trust for America’s Health and The John A. Hartford Foundation, the Florida Departments of Health and Elder Affairs are piloting the implementation of this Framework within Florida’s county health departments and at the state level. The county health departments are expanding data collection efforts to identify older adult needs, creating new alliances with aging sector partners, coordinating with other agencies and community organizations to implement evidence-based programs and policies that address priority needs, and aligning efforts with the age-friendly communities and age-friendly health systems movements.Results, and Discussion and ImplicationsThe county health departments in Florida participating in the pilot are leveraging the Framework to expand public health practice, programs, and policies that address health services and health behaviors, social, and economic factors and environmental conditions that allow older adults to age in place and live healthier and more productive lives. The model being piloted in Florida can be tailored to meet the unique needs of each community and their older adult population. ]]> <![CDATA[A Practical Methodology for Improving the Aging-Friendliness of Communities: Case Studies from Three U.S. Communities]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N2c0a9a40-fec1-49a4-87f4-47aa94e10077

Abstract

Background and Objectives

In this paper, we present a series of three case studies to illustrate an innovative and practical approach to improving the aging-friendliness of communities. These three communities used the AdvantAge Initiative to “listen” to the voices of older adults in their communities and to identify and prioritize aging-related issues. This approach was developed by the Center for Home Care Policy and Research at the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY), the largest not-for-profit home health care organization in the United States, and has been implemented in over 60 communities throughout the United States. The methodology involves tools such as conceptual frameworks, survey questionnaires, focus groups, and technical assistance to help stakeholders interpret data and find solutions to identified issues.

Research Design and Methods

We interviewed VNSNY program staff and community partners involved in three AdvantAge Initiative projects that commenced at varying time points: Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee (2012); New York City’s Chinatown neighborhood (2006); and the state of Indiana (2008). We also collected and reviewed secondary materials associated with these projects (e.g., meeting notes from community planning meetings, annual reports from grant recipients, press coverage).

Results

In this case study, we begin by providing an overview of the AdvantAge Initiative framework and the AdvantAge Initiative key indicators. We then present a more in-depth look at the three communities and how they approached and implemented the AdvantAge Initiative.

Discussion and Implications

These case studies demonstrate that this methodology may be implemented in diverse communities and geographic locations. By looking at the longer-term outcomes and by comparing the strategies employed by each community, we see that communities, regardless of size, can bring stakeholders together to promote health and implement meaningful changes that make the community a better place to live for older adults and their families.

]]>
<![CDATA[AGING IN PLACE: EFFECTIVE INTERPROFESSIONAL COLLABORATION AND ENGAGEMENT WITH OLDER ADULTS]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N6f366761-5be3-4fe2-b8f3-999a5939a1ba

Abstract

Background: An innovative educational program addresses two gaps in health professions education: lack of an emerging workforce comfortable caring for older adults and proficiency in working in an interprofessional (IP) setting. We sought to explore whether AIP provides grounding in pillars of IPE and geriatric competencies through experiential learning in IP teams with older adults in a community setting. Methods: Early health profession students n=37 (MD, MSN, PA, SW), working in teams of 3, made monthly visits to older adults’ residences over a one-year period. Workshops on core geriatric and IPE principles defined expected learning goals for client visits. Visits were followed by: 1) written field notes; 2) reflections based on pre-determined learning prompts; and 3) debriefing sessions with faculty members. Students completed pre and post program questionnaires including Attitudes Towards Social Issues in Medicine, Geriatrics Attitude Scale, ICCAS, and RIPLS. Pre-post results were analyzed using t-tests and qualitative analysis of comments. Results: 25 (68%) students completed pre-post questionnaires. Responses on the interprofessional collaboration scale significantly increased following the program (t=2.09; p = 0.047) and 94% responded that they could “well” or “very well” describe issues that impact older adults’ health, quality of life, and convey appreciation toward older adults. Discussion: Students, engaging with older adults longitudinally in a community setting learned pillars of IPE, geriatric care competencies, and gained insights into this population. An interprofessional, experiential learning program is feasible and effective way to increase interest and self-efficacy in working with older adult populations.

]]>
<![CDATA[CAPTURING IMPACT ON STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN AGING IN PLACE: A PROGRAM TO ENHANCE GERIATRIC EDUCATION]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N7d993a3d-6ecb-47ff-8b0a-2a6d381fdc1f

Abstract

Curricula to enhance healthcare students’ geriatric training has been lacking. Therefore, we developed AIP, an interprofessional (IP) community-based curriculum, in which IP student teams visit community-dwelling older adults. Using established instruments did not capture personal and professional changes experienced by students. Thus, an additional method using qualitative analyses of students’ six post-visit reflections over 15 weeks was employed to evaluate students ‘experiential learning. A grounded theory approach was used to describe students’ growth in geriatric proficiencies related to participation in the January-April 2017 AIP program . By program completion, 21 students had submitted 111 reflective essays. An interdisciplinary panel reviewed a sample of reflections and developed an initial coding system, which was then systematically applied to the whole via QSR-NVivo. Seventy-three distinct codes across 111 student essays generated 2515 occurrences. Prevalent themes, revealed by frequency analysis, and themes with remarkable trendlines yielded fifteen central themes. Students became attuned to their client’s life-world (n=185) as demonstrated by four central themes: 1) isolation, loneliness, and depression (n=44); 2) risks of fall (n=19); 3) loss of function/control (n=98); and, 4) importance of socializing in care (n=24). This attunement informed interactional intentionality (n=284), which shaped interactions with their client (n=207). From these authentic encounters, students described learning about 1) myself; 2) current and future practice; 3) team dynamics; and 4) my client as an older person. Systematic analysis of student reflections revealed student growth attributable to AIP. This evaluation approach should be further assessed in geriatric curricula.

]]>
<![CDATA[GENDER DIFFERENCES IN WIDOWHOOD IN THE SHORT RUN AND LONG RUN: FINANCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N04332b9e-1943-4dd7-9fe6-25613d926947

Abstract

This paper addresses the question of whether differences in financial and emotional wellbeing after the death of one’s spouse vary systematically with gender, using the Health and Retirement Study data between 1992 and 2014. Results show that all else being equal, widows have 22% less income than widowers, and a nine percentage points increase in their likelihood of falling into poverty. The income gap attributable to gender is considerably large for those newly widowed. The gap shrinks by half in the next ten years in widowhood but widens again substantially after the ten-year mark. The study suggests that men are protected from income losses to a higher degree than women when they lose their spouse, and the survivor benefits of the Social Security and private pension plans do not necessarily cushion widows from this risk. We also find that, in widowhood, men experience more negative affects (e.g., depression and loneliness), while women face more challenges with somatic symptoms (e.g., restless sleep). The emotional gender gaps vary with widowhood durations. In the year of their spousal losses, men suffer significantly more than women from negative affects, in particular, loneliness. Though women score better than men in affects in the short run, they are prone to having more somatic symptoms in the long run, especially restless sleep. The results indicate that men and women need different types of emotional support and attention at different times of widowhood.

]]>
<![CDATA[The role of APOE4 in Alzheimer’s disease: strategies for future therapeutic interventions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N4a6938b3-6a20-48a7-ae0a-ef8f376ce219

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia affecting almost 50 million people worldwide. The ε4 allele of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) is the strongest known genetic risk factor for late-onset AD cases, with homozygous APOE4 carriers being approximately 15-times more likely to develop the disease. With 25% of the population being APOE4 carriers, understanding the role of this allele in AD pathogenesis and pathophysiology is crucial. Though the exact mechanism by which ε4 allele increases the risk for AD is unknown, the processes mediated by APOE, including cholesterol transport, synapse formation, modulation of neurite outgrowth, synaptic plasticity, destabilization of microtubules, and β-amyloid clearance, suggest potential therapeutic targets. This review will summarize the impact of APOE on neurons and neuronal signaling, the interactions between APOE and AD pathology, and the association with memory decline. We will then describe current treatments targeting APOE4, complications associated with the current therapies, and suggestions for future areas of research and treatment.

]]>
<![CDATA[Autophagy in the mammalian nervous system: a primer for neuroscientists]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N0e73c24f-a1fe-42b7-b578-a6cd3225d1d0

Abstract

Autophagy refers to the lysosomal degradation of damaged or superfluous components and is essential for metabolic plasticity and tissue integrity. This evolutionarily conserved process is particularly vital to mammalian post-mitotic cells such as neurons, which face unique logistical challenges and must sustain homoeostasis over decades. Defective autophagy has pathophysiological importance, especially for human neurodegeneration. The present-day definition of autophagy broadly encompasses two distinct yet related phenomena: non-selective and selective autophagy. In this minireview, we focus on established and emerging concepts in the field, paying particular attention to the physiological significance of macroautophagy and the burgeoning world of selective autophagy pathways in the context of the vertebrate nervous system. By highlighting established basics and recent breakthroughs, we aim to provide a useful conceptual framework for neuroscientists interested in autophagy, in addition to autophagy enthusiasts with an eye on the nervous system.

]]>
<![CDATA[Viral Pneumonia in Older Adults]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N1457f7f8-9c86-4e91-be35-a074e19a2338

Abstract

Viruses account for a substantial portion of respiratory illnesses, including pneumonia, in the elderly population. Presently, influenza virus A H3N2 and respiratory syncytial virus are the most commonly identified viral pathogens in older adults with viral pneumonia. As diagnostic tests such as reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction become more widely used, the relative importance of additional viruses (such as parainfluenza, rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, and human metapneumovirus) will likely increase. Influenza virus should be considered as a cause of pneumonia during the winter months, especially during periods of peak activity. Patients with high-grade fever, myalgias, and cough should arouse the highest suspicion. Respiratory syncytial virus pneumonia should also be suspected during the winter in patients with coryza, wheezing, low-grade fever, and patchy infiltrates, especially if negative for influenza on rapid testing. Because clinical features and periods of activity for many viruses overlap, laboratory confirmation of influenza is recommended for cases involving seriously ill or institutionalized patients.

]]>
<![CDATA[High Sucrose Diet and Exercise: Effects on Insulin-Receptor Function of 12- and 24-mo-old Sprague-Dawley Rats]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N0507fd03-4b94-4613-b9c2-065ad75cbe92

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of aging (12 vs. 24 mo) on skeletal muscle insulin receptor function of male Sprague-Dawley rats fed either a 33% sucrose (wt/wt) or sucrose-free diet. The effect of exercise in combination with the sucrose diet was also evaluated by exercising half of the sucrose-fed group on a motorized treadmill. Insulin-receptor function was assessed in vitro by measuring the binding capacity of [125I]-insulin to partially purified receptors of the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis. Tyrosine kinase activity was measured as an index of postreceptor function. Insulin-receptor number was significantly decreased in 24-mo-old sucrose-fed rats compared to 12-mo-old rats fed the sucrose or sucrose-free diets. The affinity of insulin for the receptor did not significantly differ among groups. Maximal tyrosine kinase activity in vastus lateralis was significantly decreased in 12-mo-old sucrose-fed rats compared with sedentary 24-mo-old rats fed the sucrose-free diet or 24-mo-old rats fed the sucrose diet in combination with exercise. Exercise prevented the decrease in receptor function in both 12- and 24-mo-old sucrose-fed rats as measured by insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity. These data suggest that diet and/or exercise rather than aging per se has a greater influence on insulin-receptor function.

]]>
<![CDATA[Testosterone and Dehydroepiandrosterone Treatment in Ageing Men: Are We All Set?]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nbaef30bf-e866-463b-a391-2aa193ddb3b9

Although demographic statistics show that populations around the world are rapidly ageing, this rising life expectancy is accompanied by an increase in the number of people living with age-related chronic conditions, such as frailty, cognitive decline, depression, or sexual dysfunction. In men, a progressive decline in androgens occurs with increasing age, and low androgen levels are associated with age-related chronic conditions. However, androgen administration studies are inconclusive, showing differing results according to the androgen used (testosterone [T], dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA]), the group of men examined (younger vs. older; eugonadal vs. hypogonadal) and the conditions studied (frailty, cognitive decline, depression, sexual dysfunction). In this review, the current state for the use of T and DHEA therapy in men for the age-related conditions is examined. Due to the progressive age-related decline in androgens leading to a higher rate of older men having low androgen levels, the effects of androgen treatment in elderly males will be of particular interest in this review. Dose-response relationships, the role of potential moderators, and the androgen treatment-related risk for adverse events will be discussed. Studies have suggested that T treatment - more so than DHEA treatment - may be an effective therapy against age-related chronic conditions in men with low T levels; especially older men. Such conditions include frailty, depression, or sexual dysfunction. However, T treatment does not emerge as an effective therapy against cognitive decline. Nevertheless, more high-quality, randomised controlled trials using T treatment for age-related chronic conditions are necessary if further conclusions are to be made.

]]>