ResearchPad - alleles https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Association between the rs1544410 polymorphism in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and insulin secretion after gestational diabetes mellitus]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14643 Genetic variants involved in vitamin D metabolism have been associated with diabetes and related syndromes/diseases. We wanted to investigate possible associations of polymorphisms in genes involved in vitamin D metabolism with indices of insulin resistance and insulin secretion, and also with development of diabetes after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).Materials and methodsWe have studied 376 women with previous GDM. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes for vitamin D receptor (VDR) [rs731236, rs7975232, rs10735810, and rs1544410], vitamin D binding protein (DBP) [rs7041 and rs4588], and cytochrome P450 family 27 subfamily B member 1 (CYP27B1) [rs10877012 and rs4646536] were genotyped by TaqMan Allelic Discrimination Assay using the Quantstudio 7 Flex system. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed 1–2 years postpartum. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and the disposition index [(insulinogenic index: I30/G30)/HOMA-IR] were used to calculate insulin resistance and insulin secretion, respectively. Serum samples for determination of 25(OH)D3 were collected at the time of the OGTT. Manifestation of diabetes was followed up to five years postpartum.ResultsAfter adjustment for BMI, age, and ethnicity, the A-allele of the VDR rs1544410 polymorphism was found to be associated with increased disposition index (difference per allele = 3.56, 95% CI: 0.4567–6.674; p = 0.03). The A-allele of the DBP rs7041 polymorphism was found to be associated with 25(OH)D3 levels (difference [in nmol/L] per allele = −5.478, 95% CI: -8.315 to −2.641; p = 0.0002), as was the T-allele of the DBP rs4588 polymorphism (OR = −6.319, 95% CI: −9.466 to −3.171; p = 0.0001). None of the SNPs were significantly associated with HOMA-IR or postpartum diabetes.ConclusionsThis study provides evidence that the rs1544410 polymorphism of the VDR gene may be associated with increased insulin secretion in women after pregnancy complicated by GDM. Further studies in other populations are needed to confirm the results. ]]> <![CDATA[Evidence for both sequential mutations and recombination in the evolution of kdr alleles in Aedes aegypti]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N8479e8f6-b6ad-4aa7-91b1-bf6bde90184a

Background

Aedes aegypti is a globally distributed vector of human diseases including dengue, yellow fever, chikungunya, and Zika. Pyrethroid insecticides are the primary means of controlling adult A. aegypti populations to suppress arbovirus outbreaks, but resistance to pyrethroid insecticides has become a global problem. Mutations in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel (Vssc) gene are a major mechanism of pyrethroid resistance in A. aegypti. Vssc resistance alleles in A. aegypti commonly have more than one mutation. However, our understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of how alleles with multiple mutations arose is poorly understood.

Methodology/Principal findings

We examined the geographic distribution and association between the common Vssc mutations (V410L, S989P, V1016G/I and F1534C) in A. aegypti by analyzing the relevant Vssc fragments in 25 collections, mainly from Asia and the Americas. Our results showed all 11 Asian populations had two types of resistance alleles: 1534C and 989P+1016G. The 1534C allele was more common with frequencies ranging from 0.31 to 0.88, while the 989P+1016G frequency ranged from 0.13 to 0.50. Four distinct alleles (410L, 1534C, 410L+1534C and 410L+1016I+1534C) were detected in populations from the Americas. The most common was 410L+1016I+1534C with frequencies ranging from 0.50 to 1.00, followed by 1534C with frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.50. Our phylogenetic analysis of Vssc supported multiple independent origins of the F1534C mutation. Our results indicated the 410L+1534C allele may have arisen by addition of the V410L mutation to the 1534C allele, or by a crossover event. The 410L+1016I+1534C allele was the result of one or two mutational steps from a 1534C background.

Conclusions/Significance

Our data corroborated previous geographic distributions of resistance mutations and provided evidence for both recombination and sequential accumulation of mutations contributing to the molecular evolution of resistance alleles in A. aegypti.

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<![CDATA[Identification of NUDT15 gene variants in Amazonian Amerindians and admixed individuals from northern Brazil]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N0a09703b-e69a-40d3-8ae4-dfe23e56b45d

Introduction

The nudix hydrolase 15 (NUDT15) gene acts in the metabolism of thiopurine, by catabolizing its active metabolite thioguanosine triphosphate into its inactivated form, thioguanosine monophosphate. The frequency of alternative NUDT15 alleles, in particular those that cause a drastic loss of gene function, varies widely among geographically distinct populations. In the general population of northern Brazilian, high toxicity rates (65%) have been recorded in patients treated with the standard protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which involves thiopurine-based drugs. The present study characterized the molecular profile of the coding region of the NUDT15 gene in two groups, non-admixed Amerindians and admixed individuals from the Amazon region of northern Brazil.

Methods

The entire NUDT15 gene was sequenced in 64 Amerindians from 12 Amazonian groups and 82 admixed individuals from northern Brazil. The DNA was extracted using phenol-chloroform. The exome libraries were prepared using the Nextera Rapid Capture Exome (Illumina) and SureSelect Human All Exon V6 (Agilent) kits. The allelic variants were annotated in the ViVa® (Viewer of Variants) software.

Results

Four NUDT15 variants were identified: rs374594155, rs1272632214, rs147390019, andrs116855232. The variants rs1272632214 and rs116855232 were in complete linkage disequilibrium, and were assigned to the NUDT15*2 genotype. These variants had high frequencies in both our study populations in comparison with other populations catalogued in the 1000 Genomes database. We also identified the NUDT15*4 haplotype in our study populations, at frequencies similar to those reported in other populations from around the world.

Conclusion

Our findings indicate that Amerindian and admixed populations from northern Brazil have high frequencies of the NUDT15 haplotypes that alter the metabolism profile of thiopurines.

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<![CDATA[A framework for gene mapping in wheat demonstrated using the Yr7 yellow rust resistance gene]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N8aa5bdf2-6390-43c2-aef2-b7a76659179a

We used three approaches to map the yellow rust resistance gene Yr7 and identify associated SNPs in wheat. First, we used a traditional QTL mapping approach using a double haploid (DH) population and mapped Yr7 to a low-recombination region of chromosome 2B. To fine map the QTL, we then used an association mapping panel. Both populations were SNP array genotyped allowing alignment of QTL and genome-wide association scans based on common segregating SNPs. Analysis of the association panel spanning the QTL interval, narrowed the interval down to a single haplotype block. Finally, we used mapping-by-sequencing of resistant and susceptible DH bulks to identify a candidate gene in the interval showing high homology to a previously suggested Yr7 candidate and to populate the Yr7 interval with a higher density of polymorphisms. We highlight the power of combining mapping-by-sequencing, delivering a complete list of gene-based segregating polymorphisms in the interval with the high recombination, low LD precision of the association mapping panel. Our mapping-by-sequencing methodology is applicable to any trait and our results validate the approach in wheat, where with a near complete reference genome sequence, we are able to define a small interval containing the causative gene.

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<![CDATA[Identification of a novel single‐nucleotide mutation in SMIM1 gene that results in low Vel antigen expression]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N88f2c579-bc70-49fa-8115-53f7988197af ]]> <![CDATA[Autosomal recessive congenital cataracts linked to HSF4 in a consanguineous Pakistani family]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Na302ecef-6336-4a97-9663-2461453833de

Purpose

To investigate the genetic basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataracts (arCC) in a large consanguineous Pakistani family.

Methods

All participating members of family, PKCC074 underwent an ophthalmic examination. Slit-lamp photographs were ascertained for affected individuals that have not been operated for the removal of the cataractous lens. A small aliquot of the blood sample was collected from all participating individuals and genomic DNAs were extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed with polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) markers and the logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of HSF4 were sequenced and expression of Hsf4 in mouse ocular lens was investigated. The C-terminal FLAG-tagged wild-type and mutant HSF4b constructs were prepared to examine the nuclear localization pattern of the mutant protein.

Results

The ophthalmological examinations suggested that nuclear cataracts are present in affected individuals. Genome-wide linkage analyses localized the critical interval to a 10.95 cM (14.17 Mb) interval on chromosome 16q with a maximum two-point LOD score of 4.51 at θ = 0. Sanger sequencing identified a novel missense mutation: c.433G>C (p.Ala145Pro) that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family and was not present in ethnically matched controls. Real-time PCR analysis identified the expression of HSF4 in mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 with a steady level of expression thereafter. The immunofluorescence tracking confirmed that both wild-type and mutant HSF4 (p.Ala145Pro) proteins localized to the nucleus.

Conclusion

Here, we report a novel missense mutation in HSF4 associated with arCC in a familial case of Pakistani descent.

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<![CDATA[FBXO7 sensitivity of phenotypic traits elucidated by a hypomorphic allele]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c89776ad5eed0c4847d2c3f

FBXO7 encodes an F box containing protein that interacts with multiple partners to facilitate numerous cellular processes and has a canonical role as part of an SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Mutation of FBXO7 is responsible for an early onset Parkinsonian pyramidal syndrome and genome-wide association studies have linked variants in FBXO7 to erythroid traits. A putative orthologue in Drosophila, nutcracker, has been shown to regulate the proteasome, and deficiency of nutcracker results in male infertility. Therefore, we reasoned that modulating Fbxo7 levels in a murine model could provide insights into the role of this protein in mammals. We used a targeted gene trap model which retained 4–16% residual gene expression and assessed the sensitivity of phenotypic traits to gene dosage. Fbxo7 hypomorphs showed regenerative anaemia associated with a shorter erythrocyte half-life, and male mice were infertile. Alterations to T cell phenotypes were also observed, which intriguingly were both T cell intrinsic and extrinsic. Hypomorphic mice were also sensitive to infection with Salmonella, succumbing to a normally sublethal challenge. Despite these phenotypes, Fbxo7 hypomorphs were produced at a normal Mendelian ratio with a normal lifespan and no evidence of neurological symptoms. These data suggest that erythrocyte survival, T cell development and spermatogenesis are particularly sensitive to Fbxo7 gene dosage.

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<![CDATA[VGLL4 plays a critical role in heart valve development and homeostasis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c784fb6d5eed0c4840073d9

Heart valve disease is a major clinical problem worldwide. Cardiac valve development and homeostasis need to be precisely controlled. Hippo signaling is essential for organ development and tissue homeostasis, while its role in valve formation and morphology maintenance remains unknown. VGLL4 is a transcription cofactor in vertebrates and we found it was mainly expressed in valve interstitial cells at the post-EMT stage and was maintained till the adult stage. Tissue specific knockout of VGLL4 in different cell lineages revealed that only loss of VGLL4 in endothelial cell lineage led to valve malformation with expanded expression of YAP targets. We further semi-knockout YAP in VGLL4 ablated hearts, and found hyper proliferation of arterial valve interstitial cells was significantly constrained. These findings suggest that VGLL4 is important for valve development and manipulation of Hippo components would be a potential therapy for preventing the progression of congenital valve disease.

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<![CDATA[A polyploid admixed origin of beer yeasts derived from European and Asian wine populations]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c88240dd5eed0c48463962a

Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae used to make beer, bread, and wine are genetically and phenotypically distinct from wild populations associated with trees. The origins of these domesticated populations are not always clear; human-associated migration and admixture with wild populations have had a strong impact on S. cerevisiae population structure. We examined the population genetic history of beer strains and found that ale strains and the S. cerevisiae portion of allotetraploid lager strains were derived from admixture between populations closely related to European grape wine strains and Asian rice wine strains. Similar to both lager and baking strains, ale strains are polyploid, providing them with a passive means of remaining isolated from other populations and providing us with a living relic of their ancestral hybridization. To reconstruct their polyploid origin, we phased the genomes of two ale strains and found ale haplotypes to both be recombinants between European and Asian alleles and to also contain novel alleles derived from extinct or as yet uncharacterized populations. We conclude that modern beer strains are the product of a historical melting pot of fermentation technology.

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<![CDATA[A novel polymorphism in the fatty acid desaturase 2 gene (Fads2): A possible role in the basal metabolic rate]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c818e86d5eed0c484cc247a

Fatty acyl composition of cell membrane lipids, particularly the abundance of highly unsaturated docosahexaenoic fatty acid (22:6n-3, DHA), is likely to be an important predictor of basal metabolic rate (BMR). Our study was performed using two lines of laboratory mice divergently selected for either high or low BMR. We describe a novel single nucleotide polymorphism in the Fads2 gene encoding Δ6-desaturase, a key enzyme in the metabolic pathways of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). The allele frequencies of Fads2 were significantly different in both lines of mice. The analysis of genetic distances revealed that the genetic differentiation between the two studied lines developed significantly faster at the Fads2 locus than it did at neutral loci. Such a pattern suggests that the Fads2 polymorphism is related to the variation in BMR, i.e. the direct target of selection. The Fads2 polymorphism significantly affected abundance of several PUFAs; however, the differences in PUFA composition between lines were compatible with the difference in frequency of Fads2 alleles only for DHA. We hypothesize that the polymorphism in the Fads2 gene affects the BMR through modification of DHA abundance in cell membranes. This may be the first example of a significant link between a polymorphism in a gene responsible for fatty acyl composition and variation in BMR.

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<![CDATA[IL-10 polymorphisms +434T/C, +504G/T, and -2849C/T may predispose to tubulointersititial nephritis and uveitis in pediatric population]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c75ac83d5eed0c484d08944

Background

Tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) and uveitis syndrome (TINU) are likely to be autoimmune diseases. Based on previous studies, adults with isolated idiopathic uveitis have polymorphisms in interleukin 10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) genes. We aimed to evaluate the presence of IL-10 and TNF-α polymorphisms in a nationwide cohort of pediatric TIN/TINU patients.

Methods

Single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-10 (+434T/C, +504G/T, -1082G/A, -2849C/T) and in TNFα (-308G/A, -238G/A, -857C/T) genes were genotyped in 30 well-defined pediatric patients with idiopathic TIN/TINU syndrome. Control group frequencies for these SNPs were obtained from 393 independent Finnish subjects.

Results

The homozygous minor allele in IL-10 +434T (rs2222202) and IL-10+504G (rs3024490) was found in all patients with TIN or TINU syndrome while the frequency of these minor alleles in the control population was 44% and 23%, respectively (p <0.001). In IL-10 SNP -2849 (rs6703630) a significant difference was found with genotype TT in all patients (p = 0.004) and in subgroups with TINU syndrome (p = 0.017) and TINU syndrome with chronic uveitis (p = 0.01) compared to reference population. There were no statistical differences in any of the studied TNF-α genotypes between TIN/TINU patients and control population.

Conclusions

A significant difference in the frequency of IL-10+434T and +504G alleles was found between TIN/TINU patients and control population. Genotype -2849TT was more frequently present in patients with TINU syndrome than in the reference subjects. Genetic variation in the inflammatory mediators may predispose to autoimmune nephritis and uveitis.

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<![CDATA[Genetic redundancy fuels polygenic adaptation in Drosophila]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c61e8f6d5eed0c48496f4fd

The genetic architecture of adaptive traits is of key importance to predict evolutionary responses. Most adaptive traits are polygenic—i.e., result from selection on a large number of genetic loci—but most molecularly characterized traits have a simple genetic basis. This discrepancy is best explained by the difficulty in detecting small allele frequency changes (AFCs) across many contributing loci. To resolve this, we use laboratory natural selection to detect signatures for selective sweeps and polygenic adaptation. We exposed 10 replicates of a Drosophila simulans population to a new temperature regime and uncovered a polygenic architecture of an adaptive trait with high genetic redundancy among beneficial alleles. We observed convergent responses for several phenotypes—e.g., fitness, metabolic rate, and fat content—and a strong polygenic response (99 selected alleles; mean s = 0.059). However, each of these selected alleles increased in frequency only in a subset of the evolving replicates. We discerned different evolutionary paradigms based on the heterogeneous genomic patterns among replicates. Redundancy and quantitative trait (QT) paradigms fitted the experimental data better than simulations assuming independent selective sweeps. Our results show that natural D. simulans populations harbor a vast reservoir of adaptive variation facilitating rapid evolutionary responses using multiple alternative genetic pathways converging at a new phenotypic optimum. This key property of beneficial alleles requires the modification of testing strategies in natural populations beyond the search for convergence on the molecular level.

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<![CDATA[Variance components for bovine tuberculosis infection and multi-breed genome-wide association analysis using imputed whole genome sequence data]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f1539d5eed0c48467af0c

Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is an infectious disease of cattle generally caused by Mycobacterium bovis, a bacterium that can elicit disease humans. Since the 1950s, the objective of the national bTB eradication program in Republic of Ireland was the biological extinction of bTB; that purpose has yet to be achieved. Objectives of the present study were to develop the statistical methodology and variance components to undertake routine genetic evaluations for resistance to bTB; also of interest was the detection of regions of the bovine genome putatively associated with bTB infection in dairy and beef breeds. The novelty of the present study, in terms of research on bTB infection, was the use of beef breeds in the genome-wide association and the utilization of imputed whole genome sequence data. Phenotypic bTB data on 781,270 animals together with imputed whole genome sequence data on 7,346 of these animals’ sires were available. Linear mixed models were used to quantify variance components for bTB and EBVs were validated. Within-breed and multi-breed genome-wide associations were undertaken using a single-SNP regression approach. The estimated genetic standard deviation (0.09), heritability (0.12), and repeatability (0.30) substantiate that genetic selection help to eradicate bTB. The multi-breed genome-wide association analysis identified 38 SNPs and 64 QTL regions associated with bTB infection; two QTL regions (both on BTA23) identified in the multi-breed analysis overlapped with the within-breed analyses of Charolais, Limousin, and Holstein-Friesian. Results from the association analysis, coupled with previous studies, suggest bTB is controlled by an infinitely large number of loci, each having a small effect. The methodology and results from the present study will be used to develop national genetic evaluations for bTB in the Republic of Ireland. In addition, results can also be used to help uncover the biological architecture underlying resistance to bTB infection in cattle.

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<![CDATA[Effects of angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphism on hypertension in Africa: A meta-analysis and systematic review]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f1488d5eed0c48467a24c

Background

Hypertension is dramatically increasing in Africa with evidence of increased severity and resistance to treatment. Although angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphism is associated with higher prevalence of hypertension, the evidence is inconclusive on its influence on the emerging pattern in Africa. This meta-analysis is conducted to pool the available evidence to inform future research and interventions.

Methods

Articles published through May 2018 were systematically searched in PubMed, Scopus and EMBASE databases. Studies were assessed for inclusion by two independent researchers. Six models were used to assess the effect of angiotensin converting enzyme deletion-insertion gene polymorphism. Heterogeneity and publication bias were tested and sensitivity analysis was carried out. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were measured for pooled effect. Both random effect and fixed effect models were used, whilst the frequency of DD, II and DI genotypes were computed and compared.

Result

Patients with D allele were 1.49 times more likely to develop essential hypertension compared with patients who carry the I allele (OR:1.49; CI:1.07, 2.07). Similarly, patients who had homozygous co-dominance genotype DD (i.e., DD vs II) were at a 2.17 times higher risk of essential hypertension compared to the co-dominant genotype II (OR:2.17, CI:1.79, 3.18), dominant model (I.e., DD+ID vs II) (OR:1.48; CI:1.03, 2.12), and recessive model (OR:1.64; CI:1.03, 2.61). On subgroup analysis, participants from Sub-Saharan Africa were more genetically susceptible to hypertension compared to their North Africa counterparts. There was no publication bias found, but there was high to moderate heterogeneity.

Conclusion

ACE I/D polymorphism is associated with essential hypertension in Africa in the allele contrast model, as well as the dominant, recessive and homozygous codominance model. On subgroup analysis, ACE I/D was associated with essential hypertension in patients from Sub-Saharan Africa but not in North Africa. A future large scale study, which includes different ethnic groups, is recommended.

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<![CDATA[Dominance reversals and the maintenance of genetic variation for fitness]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c59feefd5eed0c4841357e1

Antagonistic selection between different fitness components (e.g., survival versus fertility) or different types of individuals in a population (e.g., females versus males) can potentially maintain genetic diversity and thereby account for the high levels of fitness variation observed in natural populations. However, the degree to which antagonistic selection can maintain genetic variation critically depends on the dominance relations between antagonistically selected alleles in diploid individuals. Conditions for stable polymorphism of antagonistically selected alleles are narrow, particularly when selection is weak, unless the alleles exhibit “dominance reversals”—in which each allele is partially or completely dominant in selective contexts in which it is favored and recessive in contexts in which it is harmful. Although theory predicts that dominance reversals should emerge under biologically plausible conditions, evidence for dominance reversals is sparse. In this primer, we review theoretical arguments and data supporting a role for dominance reversals in the maintenance of genetic variation. We then highlight an illuminating new study by Grieshop and Arnqvist, which reports a genome-wide signal of dominance reversals between male and female fitness in seed beetles.

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<![CDATA[Lysine 27 of replication-independent histone H3.3 is required for Polycomb target gene silencing but not for gene activation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b52c1d5eed0c4842bcf85

Proper determination of cell fates depends on epigenetic information that is used to preserve memory of decisions made earlier in development. Post-translational modification of histone residues is thought to be a central means by which epigenetic information is propagated. In particular, modifications of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) are strongly correlated with both gene activation and gene repression. H3K27 acetylation is found at sites of active transcription, whereas H3K27 methylation is found at loci silenced by Polycomb group proteins. The histones bearing these modifications are encoded by the replication-dependent H3 genes as well as the replication-independent H3.3 genes. Owing to differential rates of nucleosome turnover, H3K27 acetylation is enriched on replication-independent H3.3 histones at active gene loci, and H3K27 methylation is enriched on replication-dependent H3 histones across silenced gene loci. Previously, we found that modification of replication-dependent H3K27 is required for Polycomb target gene silencing, but it is not required for gene activation. However, the contribution of replication-independent H3.3K27 to these functions is unknown. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to mutate the endogenous replication-independent H3.3K27 to a non-modifiable residue. Surprisingly, we find that H3.3K27 is also required for Polycomb target gene silencing despite the association of H3.3 with active transcription. However, the requirement for H3.3K27 comes at a later stage of development than that found for replication-dependent H3K27, suggesting a greater reliance on replication-independent H3.3K27 in post-mitotic cells. Notably, we find no evidence of global transcriptional defects in H3.3K27 mutants, despite the strong correlation between H3.3K27 acetylation and active transcription.

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<![CDATA[Balancing selection at a premature stop mutation in the myostatin gene underlies a recessive leg weakness syndrome in pigs]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b52bfd5eed0c4842bcf6f

Balancing selection provides a plausible explanation for the maintenance of deleterious alleles at moderate frequency in livestock, including lethal recessives exhibiting heterozygous advantage in carriers. In the current study, a leg weakness syndrome causing mortality of piglets in a commercial line showed monogenic recessive inheritance, and a region on chromosome 15 associated with the syndrome was identified by homozygosity mapping. Whole genome resequencing of cases and controls identified a mutation causing a premature stop codon within exon 3 of the porcine Myostatin (MSTN) gene, similar to those causing a double-muscling phenotype observed in several mammalian species. The MSTN mutation was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the population at birth, but significantly distorted amongst animals still in the herd at 110 kg, due to an absence of homozygous mutant genotypes. In heterozygous form, the MSTN mutation was associated with a major increase in muscle depth and decrease in fat depth, suggesting that the deleterious allele was maintained at moderate frequency due to heterozygous advantage (allele frequency, q = 0.22). Knockout of the porcine MSTN by gene editing has previously been linked to problems of low piglet survival and lameness. This MSTN mutation is an example of putative balancing selection in livestock, providing a plausible explanation for the lack of disrupting MSTN mutations in pigs despite many generations of selection for lean growth.

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<![CDATA[Mutation screening in non-syndromic hearing loss patients with cochlear implantation by massive parallel sequencing in Taiwan]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c79b005d5eed0c4841e3c60

Objectives

To explore the molecular epidemiology of rare deafness genes in Taiwanese sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) patients with cochlear implantation (CI) by performing massive parallel sequencing (MPS) and correlating genetic factors and CI outcomes.

Methods

We enrolled 41 Taiwanese non-syndromic deafness patients with CI that lacked known mutations in common deafness genes. All probands were screened by a targeted exon amplification method that used massively parallel sequencing to screen a customized panel that included 40 relatively rare non-syndromic deafness genes.

Results

Thirteen candidate variants in nine relatively rare deafness genes (MYO15A, TMC1, MYH14, MYO3A, ACTG1, COL11A2, DSPP, GRHL2, and WFS1) were identified in 24.4% (10/41) of the non-syndromic deafness probands with CI. According to the ACMG Standards and Guidelines, five variants in MYO15A and ACTG1 were classified as likely pathogenic variants. Two of three multi-generational pedigrees exhibiting deafness were analyzed for the segregation of the disorder with the possible disease-causing variants. Patients with variants detected in most of the identified variant-bearing genes showed relatively good CI outcomes.

Conclusions

We successfully identified candidate variants in partially deaf Taiwanese probands who lacked the known mutations in common deafness genes. Comparing the progress of hearing rehabilitation in CI patients with their apparent causative variants and the expression profiles of their altered genes allowed us to speculate on how alterations in specific gene sets may influence outcomes in hearing rehabilitation after CI.

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<![CDATA[Evolution of SSR diversity from wild types to U.S. advanced cultivars in the Andean and Mesoamerican domestications of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5ca2f4d5eed0c48441ee62

Progress in common bean breeding requires the exploitation of genetic variation among market classes, races and gene pools. The present study was conducted to determine the amount of genetic variation and the degree of relatedness among 192 selected common bean advanced cultivars using 58 simple-sequence-repeat markers (SSR) evenly distributed along the 11 linkage groups of the Phaseolus reference map. All the lines belonged to commercial seed type classes that are widely grown in the USA and include both dry bean and snap beans for the fresh and processing markets. Through population structure, principal components analyses, cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC), Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes as well as most American commercial type classes could be distinguished. The genetic relationship among the commercial cultivars revealed by the SSR markers was generally in agreement with known pedigree data. The Mesoamerican cultivars were separated into three major groups—black, small white, and navy accessions clustered together in a distinct group, while great northern and pinto clustered in another group, showing mixed origin. The Andean cultivars were distributed in two different groups. The kidney market classes formed a single group, while the green bean accessions were distributed between the Andean and Mesoamerican groups, showing inter-gene pool genetic admixture. For a subset of 24 SSR markers, we compared and contrasted the genetic diversity of the commercial cultivars with those of wild and domesticated landrace accessions of common bean. An overall reduction in genetic diversity was observed in both gene pools, Andean and Mesoamerican, from wild to landraces to advanced cultivars. The limited diversity in the commercial cultivars suggests that an important goal of bean breeding programs should be to broaden the cultivated gene pool, particularly the genetic diversity of specific commercial classes, using the genetic variability present in common bean landraces.

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<![CDATA[A variant of the Escherichia coli anaerobic transcription factor FNR exhibiting diminished promoter activation function enhances ionizing radiation resistance]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5217d1d5eed0c484794619

We have previously generated four replicate populations of ionizing radiation (IR)-resistant Escherichia coli though directed evolution. Sequencing of isolates from these populations revealed that mutations affecting DNA repair (through DNA double-strand break repair and replication restart), ROS amelioration, and cell wall metabolism were prominent. Three mutations involved in DNA repair explained the IR resistance phenotype in one population, and similar DNA repair mutations were prominent in two others. The remaining population, IR-3-20, had no mutations in the key DNA repair proteins, suggesting that it had taken a different evolutionary path to IR resistance. Here, we present evidence that a variant of the anaerobic metabolism transcription factor FNR, unique to and isolated from population IR-3-20, plays a role in IR resistance. The F186I allele of FNR exhibits a diminished ability to activate transcription from FNR-activatable promoters, and furthermore reduces levels of intracellular ROS. The FNR F186I variant is apparently capable of enhancing resistance to IR under chronic irradiation conditions, but does not increase cell survival when exposed to acute irradiation. Our results underline the importance of dose rate on cell survival of IR exposure.

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