ResearchPad - amino-acids https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Atco, a yeast mitochondrial complex of Atp9 and Cox6, is an assembly intermediate of the ATP synthase]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14724 Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos) is the process by which the ATP synthase conserves the energy released during the oxidation of different nutrients as ATP. The yeast ATP synthase consists of three assembly modules, one of which is a ring consisting of 10 copies of the Atp9 subunit. We previously reported the existence in yeast mitochondria of high molecular weight complexes composed of mitochondrially encoded Atp9 and of Cox6, an imported structural subunit of cytochrome oxidase (COX). Pulse-chase experiments indicated a correlation between the loss of newly translated Atp9 complexed to Cox6 and an increase of newly formed Atp9 ring, but did not exclude the possibility of an alternate source of Atp9 for ring formation. Here we have extended studies on the functions and structure of this complex, referred to as Atco. We show that Atco is the exclusive source of Atp9 for the ATP synthase assembly. Pulse-chase experiments show that newly translated Atp9, present in Atco, is converted to a ring, which is incorporated into the ATP synthase with kinetics characteristic of a precursor-product relationship. Even though Atco does not contain the ring form of Atp9, cross-linking experiments indicate that it is oligomeric and that the inter-subunit interactions are similar to those of the bona fide ring. We propose that, by providing Atp9 for biogenesis of ATP synthase, Atco complexes free Cox6 for assembly of COX. This suggests that Atco complexes may play a role in coordinating assembly and maintaining proper stoichiometry of the two oxphos enzymes

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<![CDATA[The impact of rumen-protected amino acids on the expression of key- genes involved in the innate immunity of dairy sheep]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14615 Rumen protected amino acids inclusion in ewes’ diets has been proposed to enhance their innate immunity. The objective of this work was to determine the impact of dietary supplementation with rumen-protected methionine or lysine, as well as with a combination of these amino acids in two different ratios, on the expression of selected key-genes (NLRs, MyD88, TRIF, MAPK-1, IRF-3, JunD, TRAF-3, IRF-5, IL-1α, IL-10, IKK-α, STAT-3 and HO-1). Thus, sixty Chios dairy ewes (Ovis aries) were assigned to one of the following five dietary treatments (12 animals/ treatment): A: basal diet consist of concentrates, wheat straw and alfalfa hay (control group); B: basal diet +6.0 g/head rumen-protected methionine; C: basal diet + 5.0 g/head rumen-protected lysine; D: basal diet +6.0 g/head rumen-protected methionine + 5.0 g/head rumen-protected lysine and E: basal diet +12.0 g/head rumen-protected methionine + 5.0 g/head rumen-protected lysine. The results revealed a significant downregulation of relative transcript level of the IL-1α gene in the neutrophils of C and in monocytes of D ewes compared with the control. Significantly lower mRNA transcript accumulation was also observed for the MyD88 gene in the neutrophils of ewes fed with lysine only (C). The mRNA relative expression levels of JunD gene were highly induced in the monocytes, while those of IL-10 and HO-1 genes were declined in the neutrophils of ewes fed with the C and D diets compared with the control. Lower transcript levels of STAT-3 gene were observed in the neutrophils of ewes fed with either C or with E diets in comparison with the control. In conclusion, our results suggest that the dietary supplementation of ewes with rumen-protected amino acids, down regulate the expression of some genes involved in the pro-inflammatory signalling.

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<![CDATA[Ontogenetic changes in energetic reserves, digestive enzymes, amino acid and energy content of <i>Lithodes santolla</i> (Anomura: Lithodidae): Baseline for culture]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14500 The southern king crab (SKC) Lithodes santolla is an important commercial species in southern South America. Fishing pressure has caused the deterioration of its stocks. Currently, culture techniques are being developed for producing SKC juveniles to enhance the natural population and to recover the fishing stock. Therefore, it is necessary to know about physiology, energetic and nutritional requirements for SKC maintenance in hatchery. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the biochemical and physiological changes in the midgut gland, muscle and hemolymph of juveniles, pre-adults and adults of wild SKC. The energetic reserves, digestive enzymes activity, amino acid profile and energy were quantified in twelve juveniles, ten pre-adult, and ten adult crabs. Juveniles showed high glycogen and low lipids in the midgut gland, and low proteins and low lactate in muscle. In the hemolymph, juveniles had high lipids. Pre-adults had high glycogen and lipids in the midgut gland, and both high protein and lactate in muscle. In the hemolymph, pre-adults had high lipids. Adults had low glycogen and high lipids in midgut gland, and both high proteins and high lactate in muscle. In hemolymph, adults had high glucose and lactate. Juveniles and pre-adults had high proteinase activity, whereas adults had high lipase activity. Major essential amino acids of SKC were arginine, methionine, and tryptophan, and the non-essential amino acids were glycine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid. On another hand, SKC had similar energy in the midgut gland and muscle, regardless of the ontogenetic stage. Moreover, we demonstrated that the biochemical energy calculation underestimates the actual measured values by a calorimeter. Thus, our results help to understand the physiological changes, energetic and nutritional requirements of L. santolla, and this study is a baseline for research on diet formulation for maintaining this species under culture conditions.

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<![CDATA[Collagen methionine sulfoxide and glucuronidine/LW-1 are markers of coronary artery disease in long-term survivors with type 1 diabetes. The Dialong study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13877 Type 1 diabetes is a risk factor for coronary heart disease. The underlying mechanism behind the accelerated atherosclerosis formation is not fully understood but may be related to the formation of oxidation products and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). We aimed to examine the associations between the collagen oxidation product methionine sulfoxide; the collagen AGEs methylglyoxal hydroimidazolone (MG-H1), glucosepane, pentosidine, glucuronidine/LW-1; and serum receptors for AGE (RAGE) with measures of coronary artery disease in patients with long-term type 1 diabetes.MethodsIn this cross-sectional study, 99 participants with type 1 diabetes of ≥ 45-year duration and 63 controls without diabetes had either established coronary heart disease (CHD) or underwent Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography (CTCA) measuring total, calcified and soft/mixed plaque volume. Skin collagen methionine sulfoxide and AGEs were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and serum sRAGE/esRAGE by ELISA.ResultsIn the diabetes group, low levels of methionine sulfoxide (adjusted for age, sex and mean HbA1c) were associated with normal coronary arteries, OR 0.48 (95% CI 0.27–0.88). Glucuronidine/LW-1 was associated with established CHD, OR 2.0 (1.16–3.49). MG-H1 and glucuronidine/LW-1 correlated with calcified plaque volume (r = 0.23–0.28, p<0.05), while pentosidine correlated with soft/mixed plaque volume (r = 0.29, p = 0.008), also in the adjusted analysis.ConclusionsLow levels of collagen-bound methionine sulfoxide were associated with normal coronary arteries while glucuronidine/LW-1 was positively associated with established CHD in long-term type 1 diabetes, suggesting a role for metabolic and oxidative stress in the formation of atherosclerosis in diabetes. ]]> <![CDATA[A modified arginine-depleting enzyme NEI-01 inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_11227 Arginine deprivation cancer therapy targets certain types of malignancies with positive result in many studies and clinical trials. NEI-01 was designed as a novel arginine-depleting enzyme comprising an albumin binding domain capable of binding to human serum albumin to lengthen its half-life. In the present work, NEI-01 is shown to bind to serum albumin from various species, including mice, rat and human. Single intraperitoneal administration of NEI-01 to mice reduced plasma arginine to undetectable level for at least 9 days. Treatment of NEI-01 specifically inhibited cell viability of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cancer cell lines, which were ASS1 negative. Using a human pancreatic mouse xenograft model, NEI-01 treatment significantly reduced tumor volume and weight. Our data provides proof of principle for a cancer treatment strategy using NEI-01.

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<![CDATA[Uptake and speciation of zinc in edible plants grown in smelter contaminated soils]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N21b4cc8f-fdc5-4198-8cfa-2868c1971919

Heavy metal accumulation in edible plants grown in contaminated soils poses a major environmental risk to humans and grazing animals. This study focused on the concentration and speciation of Zn in different edible plants grown in soils contaminated with smelter wastes (Spelter, WV, USA) containing high levels of the metals Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd. Their accumulation was examined in different parts (roots, stem, and leaves) of plants and as a function of growth stage (dry seed, sprouting seed, cotyledon, and leaves) in the root vegetables radish, the leafy vegetable spinach and the legume clover. Although the accumulation of metals varied significantly with plant species, the average metal concentrations were [Zn] > [Pb] > [Cu] > [Cd]. Metal uptake studies were complemented with bulk and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Zn K-edge and micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) measurements to evaluate the speciation and distribution of Zn in these plant species. Dynamic interplay between the histidine and malate complexation of Zn was observed in all plant species. XRF mapping of spinach leaves at micron spatial resolution demonstrated the accumulation of Zn in vacuoles and leaf tips. Radish root showed accumulation of Zn in root hairs, likely as ZnS nanoparticles. At locations of high Zn concentration in spinach leaves, μXANES suggests Zn complexation with histidine, as opposed to malate in the bulk leaf. These findings shed new light on the dynamic nature of Zn speciation in plants.

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<![CDATA[Crystal structures of Triosephosphate Isomerases from Taenia solium and Schistosoma mansoni provide insights for vaccine rationale and drug design against helminth parasites]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N340e3046-cb91-4c84-8d1b-fb2a65cf4cdb

Triosephosphate isomerases (TPIs) from Taenia solium (TsTPI) and Schistosoma mansoni (SmTPI) are potential vaccine and drug targets against cysticercosis and schistosomiasis, respectively. This is due to the dependence of parasitic helminths on glycolysis and because those proteins elicit an immune response, presumably due to their surface localization. Here we report the crystal structures of TsTPI and SmTPI in complex with 2-phosphoglyceric acid (2-PGA). Both TPIs fold into a dimeric (β-α)8 barrel in which the dimer interface consists of α-helices 2, 3, and 4, and swapping of loop 3. TPIs from parasitic helminths harbor a region of three amino acids knows as the SXD/E insert (S155 to E157 and S157 to D159 in TsTPI and SmTPI, respectively). This insert is located between α5 and β6 and is proposed to be the main TPI epitope. This region is part of a solvent-exposed 310–helix that folds into a hook-like structure. The crystal structures of TsTPI and SmTPI predicted conformational epitopes that could be used for vaccine design. Surprisingly, the epitopes corresponding to the SXD/E inserts are not the ones with the greatest immunological potential. SmTPI, but not TsTPI, habors a sole solvent exposed cysteine (SmTPI-S230) and alterations in this residue decrease catalysis. The latter suggests that thiol-conjugating agents could be used to target SmTPI. In sum, the crystal structures of SmTPI and TsTPI are a blueprint for targeted schistosomiasis and cysticercosis drug and vaccine development.

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<![CDATA[Dysregulation of multiple metabolic networks related to brain transmethylation and polyamine pathways in Alzheimer disease: A targeted metabolomic and transcriptomic study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nf62c48b8-7c01-44cc-9110-a611b974b3f9

Background

There is growing evidence that Alzheimer disease (AD) is a pervasive metabolic disorder with dysregulation in multiple biochemical pathways underlying its pathogenesis. Understanding how perturbations in metabolism are related to AD is critical to identifying novel targets for disease-modifying therapies. In this study, we test whether AD pathogenesis is associated with dysregulation in brain transmethylation and polyamine pathways.

Methods and findings

We first performed targeted and quantitative metabolomics assays using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) on brain samples from three groups in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) (AD: n = 17; Asymptomatic AD [ASY]: n = 13; Control [CN]: n = 13) (overall 37.2% female; mean age at death 86.118 ± 9.842 years) in regions both vulnerable and resistant to AD pathology. Using linear mixed-effects models within two primary brain regions (inferior temporal gyrus [ITG] and middle frontal gyrus [MFG]), we tested associations between brain tissue concentrations of 26 metabolites and the following primary outcomes: group differences, Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease (CERAD) (neuritic plaque burden), and Braak (neurofibrillary pathology) scores. We found significant alterations in concentrations of metabolites in AD relative to CN samples, as well as associations with severity of both CERAD and Braak, mainly in the ITG. These metabolites represented biochemical reactions in the (1) methionine cycle (choline: lower in AD, p = 0.003; S-adenosyl methionine: higher in AD, p = 0.005); (2) transsulfuration and glutathione synthesis (cysteine: higher in AD, p < 0.001; reduced glutathione [GSH]: higher in AD, p < 0.001); (3) polyamine synthesis/catabolism (spermidine: higher in AD, p = 0.004); (4) urea cycle (N-acetyl glutamate: lower in AD, p < 0.001); (5) glutamate-aspartate metabolism (N-acetyl aspartate: lower in AD, p = 0.002); and (6) neurotransmitter metabolism (gamma-amino-butyric acid: lower in AD, p < 0.001). Utilizing three Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets, we then examined mRNA expression levels of 71 genes encoding enzymes regulating key reactions within these pathways in the entorhinal cortex (ERC; AD: n = 25; CN: n = 52) and hippocampus (AD: n = 29; CN: n = 56). Complementing our metabolomics results, our transcriptomics analyses also revealed significant alterations in gene expression levels of key enzymatic regulators of biochemical reactions linked to transmethylation and polyamine metabolism. Our study has limitations: our metabolomics assays measured only a small proportion of all metabolites participating in the pathways we examined. Our study is also cross-sectional, limiting our ability to directly test how AD progression may impact changes in metabolite concentrations or differential-gene expression. Additionally, the relatively small number of brain tissue samples may have limited our power to detect alterations in all pathway-specific metabolites and their genetic regulators.

Conclusions

In this study, we observed broad dysregulation of transmethylation and polyamine synthesis/catabolism, including abnormalities in neurotransmitter signaling, urea cycle, aspartate-glutamate metabolism, and glutathione synthesis. Our results implicate alterations in cellular methylation potential and increased flux in the transmethylation pathways, increased demand on antioxidant defense mechanisms, perturbations in intermediate metabolism in the urea cycle and aspartate-glutamate pathways disrupting mitochondrial bioenergetics, increased polyamine biosynthesis and breakdown, as well as abnormalities in neurotransmitter metabolism that are related to AD.

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<![CDATA[Toscana virus non-structural protein NSs acts as E3 ubiquitin ligase promoting RIG-I degradation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Na0a913dc-a63b-43c4-adc6-448aab832714

It is known that the non-structural protein (NSs) of Toscana virus (TOSV), an emergent sandfly-borne virus causing meningitis or more severe central nervous system injuries in humans, exerts its function triggering RIG-I for degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner, thus breaking off the IFN-β production. The non-structural protein of different members of Bunyavirales has recently appeared as a fundamental protagonist in immunity evasion through ubiquitination-mediated protein degradation targets. We showed that TOSV NSs has an E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, mapping at the carboxy-terminal domain and also involving the amino-terminal of the protein. Indeed, neither the amino- (NSsΔN) nor the carboxy- (NSsΔC) terminal-deleted mutants of TOSV NSs were able to cause ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation of RIG-I. Moreover, the addition of the C-terminus of TOSV NSs to the homologous protein of the Sandfly Fever Naples Virus, belonging to the same genus and unable to inhibit IFN-β activity, conferred new properties to this protein, favoring RIG-I ubiquitination and its degradation. NSs lost its antagonistic activity to IFN when one of the terminal residues was missing. Therefore, we showed that NSs could behave as an atypical RING between RING (RBR) E3 ubiquitin ligases. This is the first report which identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in a viral protein among negative strand RNA viruses.

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<![CDATA[The mechanism on phosphorylation of Hsp20Ser16 inhibit GA stress and ER stress during OGD/R]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8acc8cd5eed0c48498f9ce

Recent research has demonstrated that small heat shock protein (sHsp) phosphorylation plays a variety of roles in neural cells. While the phosphorylation of serine 16 (Ser16) is blocked, Hsp20 no longer has neuroprotective effects. To further investigate the mechanism underlying this process, oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) was used with human SH-SY5Y cells and mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells. When SH-SY5Y and N2a cells were transfected with pEGFP-Hsp20(WT), pEGFP-Hsp20(S16A), and pEGFP-Hsp20(S16D) plasmids, the Golgi apparatus (GA) became more swollen and scattered, and many small fragments formed in the MOCK and S16A groups after OGD/R (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network was reduced, and the lamellar structure increased. However, these changes were not as obvious in the WT and S16D groups. Additionally, after OGD/R, Golgi Stress related protein contents were increased in the WT and S16D groups compared with the MOCK and S16A groups (P < 0.05). However, ER Stress related protein contents were decreased in the WT and S16D groups compared with the MOCK and S16A groups (P < 0.05). Our study demonstrates that Hsp20 phosphorylation on Ser16 protects against not only OGD/R-induced GA fragmentation in SH-SY5Y cells and N2a cells via Golgi stress but also OGD/R-induced ER structural changes in SH-SY5Y cells via ER stress. These findings suggest that Hsp20 is a potential drug target for ischemia stroke treatment.

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<![CDATA[Citrulline protects mice from experimental cerebral malaria by ameliorating hypoargininemia, urea cycle changes and vascular leak]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8c194bd5eed0c484b4d370

Clinical and model studies indicate that low nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability due in part to profound hypoargininemia contributes to cerebral malaria (CM) pathogenesis. Protection against CM pathogenesis may be achieved by altering the diet before infection with Plasmodium falciparum infection (nutraceutical) or by administering adjunctive therapy that decreases CM mortality (adjunctive therapy). This hypothesis was tested by administering citrulline or arginine in experimental CM (eCM). We report that citrulline injected as prophylaxis immediately post infection (PI) protected virtually all mice by ameliorating (i) hypoargininemia, (ii) urea cycle impairment, and (iii) disruption of blood brain barrier. Citrulline prophylaxis inhibited plasma arginase activity. Parasitemia was similar in citrulline- and vehicle control-groups, indicating that protection from pathogenesis was not due to decreased parasitemia. Both citrulline and arginine administered from day 1 PI in the drinking water significantly protected mice from eCM. These observations collectively indicate that increasing dietary citrulline or arginine decreases eCM mortality. Citrulline injected ip on day 4 PI with quinine-injected ip on day 6 PI partially protected mice from eCM; citrulline plus scavenging of superoxide with pegylated superoxide dismutase and pegylated catalase protected all recipients from eCM. These findings indicate that ameliorating hypoargininemia with citrulline plus superoxide scavenging decreases eCM mortality.

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<![CDATA[Uncovering and resolving challenges of quantitative modeling in a simplified community of interacting cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c99020dd5eed0c484b97589

Quantitative modeling is useful for predicting behaviors of a system and for rationally constructing or modifying the system. The predictive power of a model relies on accurate quantification of model parameters. Here, we illustrate challenges in parameter quantification and offer means to overcome these challenges, using a case example in which we quantitatively predict the growth rate of a cooperative community. Specifically, the community consists of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, each engineered to release a metabolite required and consumed by its partner. The initial model, employing parameters measured in batch monocultures with zero or excess metabolite, failed to quantitatively predict experimental results. To resolve the model–experiment discrepancy, we chemically identified the correct exchanged metabolites, but this did not improve model performance. We then remeasured strain phenotypes in chemostats mimicking the metabolite-limited community environments, while mitigating or incorporating effects of rapid evolution. Almost all phenotypes we measured, including death rate, metabolite release rate, and the amount of metabolite consumed per cell birth, varied significantly with the metabolite environment. Once we used parameters measured in a range of community-like chemostat environments, prediction quantitatively agreed with experimental results. In summary, using a simplified community, we uncovered and devised means to resolve modeling challenges that are likely general to living systems.

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<![CDATA[An antibody-free sample pretreatment method for osteopontin combined with MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c990284d5eed0c484b9802d

Osteopontin is an osteoblast-secreted protein with an aspartic acid-rich, highly phosphorylated, and glycosylated structure. Osteopontin can easily bind to integrins, tumor cells, extracellular matrix and calcium, and is related to bone diseases, various cancers, inflammation etc. Here, DEAE-Cibacron blue 3GA was used to extract recombinant osteopontin from human plasma, and to deplete abundant plasma proteins with an antibody-free method. Using selected buffer systems, osteopontin and human serum albumin could be bound to DEAE-Cibacron blue 3GA, while immunoglobulin G was excluded. The bound osteopontin could then be separated from albumin by using different sequential elution buffers. By this method, 1 μg/mL recombinant osteopontin could be separated from the major part of the most abundant proteins in human plasma. After trypsin digestion, the extracted osteopontin could be successfully detected and identified by MALDI-TOF MS/MS using the m/z 1854.898 peptide and its fragments.

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<![CDATA[Ser96Ala genetic variant of the human histidine-rich calcium-binding protein is a genetic predictor of recurrence after catheter ablation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c897742d5eed0c4847d2858

Background

Atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) still remains a serious issue. Ca2+ handling has a considerable effect on AF recurrence. The histidine-rich calcium-binding protein (HRC) genetic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs3745297 (T>G, Ser96Ala), is known to cause a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak. We investigated the association between HRC Ser96Ala and AF recurrence after RFCA in paroxysmal AF (PAF) patients.

Methods and results

We enrolled PAF patients who underwent RFCA (N = 334 for screening and N = 245 for replication) and were genotyped for HRC SNP (rs3745297). The patient age was younger and rate of diabetes and hypertension lower in the PAF patients with Ser96Ala than in those without (TT/TG/GG, 179/120/35; 64±10/60±12/59±13 y, P = 0.001; 18.5/ 9.2/8.6%, P = 0.04 and 66.1/50.0/37.1%, P = 0.001, respectively). During a mean 19 month follow-up, 57 (17.1%) patients suffered from AF recurrences. The rate of an Ser96Ala was significantly higher in patients with AF recurrence than in those without in the screening set (allele frequency model: odds ratio [OR], 1.80; P = 0.006). We also confirmed this significant association in the replication set (OR 1.74; P = 0.03) and combination (P = 0.0008). A multivariate analysis revealed that the AF duration, sinus node dysfunction, and HRC Ser96Ala were independent predictors of an AF recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 1.04, P = 0.037; HR 2.42, P = 0.018; and HR 2.66, P = 0.007, respectively).

Conclusion

HRC SNP Ser96Ala is important as a new genetic marker of AF recurrence after RFCA.

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<![CDATA[A precedented nuclear genetic code with all three termination codons reassigned as sense codons in the syndinean Amoebophrya sp. ex Karlodinium veneficum]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c818e8fd5eed0c484cc2557

Amoebophrya is part of an enigmatic, diverse, and ubiquitous marine alveolate lineage known almost entirely from anonymous environmental sequencing. Two cultured Amoebophrya strains grown on core dinoflagellate hosts were used for transcriptome sequencing. BLASTx using different genetic codes suggests that Amoebophyra sp. ex Karlodinium veneficum uses the three typical stop codons (UAA, UAG, and UGA) to encode amino acids. When UAA and UAG are translated as glutamine about half of the alignments have better BLASTx scores, and when UGA is translated as tryptophan one fifth have better scores. However, the sole stop codon appears to be UGA based on conserved genes, suggesting contingent translation of UGA. Neither host sequences, nor sequences from the second strain, Amoebophrya sp. ex Akashiwo sanguinea had similar results in BLASTx searches. A genome survey of Amoebophyra sp. ex K. veneficum showed no evidence for transcript editing aside from mitochondrial transcripts. The dynein heavy chain (DHC) gene family was surveyed and of 14 transcripts only two did not use UAA, UAG, or UGA in a coding context. Overall the transcriptome displayed strong bias for A or U in third codon positions, while the tRNA genome survey showed bias against codons ending in U, particularly for amino acids with two codons ending in either C or U. Together these clues suggest contingent translation mechanisms in Amoebophyra sp. ex K. veneficum and a phylogenetically distinct instance of genetic code modification.

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<![CDATA[S100A4 inhibits cell proliferation by interfering with the S100A1-RAGE V domain]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c75ac75d5eed0c484d087e3

The Ca2+-dependent human S100A4 (Mts1) protein is part of the S100 family. Here, we studied the interactions of S100A4 with S100A1 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We used the chemical shift perturbed residues from HSQC to model S100A4 and S100A1 complex with HADDOCK software. We observed that S100A1 and the RAGE V domain have an analogous binding area in S100A4. We discovered that S100A4 acts as an antagonist among the RAGE V domain and S100A1, which inhibits tumorigenesis and cell proliferation. We used a WST-1 assay to examine the bioactivity of S100A1 and S100A4. This study could possibly be beneficial for evaluating new proteins for the treatment of diseases.

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<![CDATA[An anti-Gn glycoprotein antibody from a convalescent patient potently inhibits the infection of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5df314d5eed0c484580cb6

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease localized to China, Japan, and Korea that is characterized by severe hemorrhage and a high fatality rate. Currently, no specific vaccine or treatment has been approved for this disease. To develop a therapeutic agent for SFTS, we isolated antibodies from a phage-displayed antibody library that was constructed from a patient who recovered from SFTS virus (SFTSV) infection. One antibody, designated as Ab10, was reactive to the Gn envelope glycoprotein of SFTSV and protected host cells and A129 mice from infection in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Notably, Ab10 protected 80% of mice, even when injected 5 days after inoculation with a lethal dose of SFTSV. Using cross-linker assisted mass spectrometry and alanine scanning, we located the non-linear epitope of Ab10 on the Gn glycoprotein domain II and an unstructured stem region, suggesting that Ab10 may inhibit a conformational alteration that is critical for cell membrane fusion between the virus and host cell. Ab10 reacted to recombinant Gn glycoprotein in Gangwon/Korea/2012, HB28, and SD4 strains. Additionally, based on its epitope, we predict that Ab10 binds the Gn glycoprotein in 247 of 272 SFTSV isolates previously reported. Together, these data suggest that Ab10 has potential to be developed into a therapeutic agent that could protect against more than 90% of reported SFTSV isolates.

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<![CDATA[Novel site-specific PEGylated L-asparaginase]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6c7587d5eed0c4843cfe5d

L-asparaginase (ASNase) from Escherichia coli is currently used in some countries in its PEGylated form (ONCASPAR, pegaspargase) to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). PEGylation refers to the covalent attachment of poly(ethylene) glycol to the protein drug and it not only reduces the immune system activation but also decreases degradation by plasmatic proteases. However, pegaspargase is randomly PEGylated and, consequently, with a high degree of polydispersity in its final formulation. In this work we developed a site-specific N-terminus PEGylation protocol for ASNase. The monoPEG-ASNase was purified by anionic followed by size exclusion chromatography to a final purity of 99%. The highest yield of monoPEG-ASNase of 42% was obtained by the protein reaction with methoxy polyethylene glycol-carboxymethyl N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (10kDa) in 100 mM PBS at pH 7.5 and PEG:ASNase ratio of 25:1. The monoPEG-ASNase was found to maintain enzymatic stability for more days than ASNase, also was resistant to the plasma proteases like asparaginyl endopeptidase and cathepsin B. Additionally, monoPEG-ASNase was found to be potent against leukemic cell lines (MOLT-4 and REH) in vitro like polyPEG-ASNase. monoPEG-ASNase demonstrates its potential as a novel option for ALL treatment, being an inventive novelty that maintains the benefits of the current enzyme and solves challenges.

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<![CDATA[SIRT5 deficiency suppresses mitochondrial ATP production and promotes AMPK activation in response to energy stress]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dc99ed5eed0c484529ee3

Sirtuin 5 (SIRT5) is a member of the NAD+-dependent sirtuin family of protein deacylase that catalyzes removal of post-translational modifications, such as succinylation, malonylation, and glutarylation on lysine residues. In light of the SIRT5's roles in regulating mitochondrion function, we show here that SIRT5 deficiency leads to suppression of mitochondrial NADH oxidation and inhibition of ATP synthase activity. As a result, SIRT5 deficiency decreases mitochondrial ATP production, increases AMP/ATP ratio, and subsequently activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in cultured cells and mouse hearts under energy stress conditions. Moreover, Sirt5 knockout attenuates transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction in mice, which is associated with decreased ATP level, increased AMP/ATP ratio and enhanced AMPK activation. Our study thus uncovers an important role of SIRT5 in regulating cellular energy metabolism and AMPK activation in response to energy stress.

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<![CDATA[Drosophila ZDHHC8 palmitoylates scribble and Ras64B and controls growth and viability]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6730b5d5eed0c484f37f58

Palmitoylation is an important posttranslational modification regulating diverse cellular functions. Consequently, aberrant palmitoylation can lead to diseases such as neuronal disorders or cancer. In humans there are roughly one hundred times more palmitoylated proteins than enzymes catalyzing palmitoylation (palmitoyltransferases). Therefore, it is an important challenge to establish the links between palmitoyltransferases and their targets. From publicly available data, we find that expression of human ZDHHC8 correlates significantly with cancer survival. To elucidate the organismal function of ZDHHC8, we study the Drosophila ortholog of hZDHHC8, CG34449/dZDHHC8. Knockdown of dZDHHC8 causes tissue overgrowth while dZDHHC8 mutants are larval lethal. We provide a list of 159 palmitoylated proteins in Drosophila and present data suggesting that scribble and Ras64B are targets of dZDHHC8.

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