ResearchPad - articulo-original https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Association between metabolic syndrome and euthyroid nodular goiter: a case-control study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14088 Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities and abdominal obesity; its pathophysiologic basis, insulin resistance, has been shown to act as agent in thyroid cell proliferation. Few studies analyze the relationship between metabolic syndrome and thyroid nodular disease, with a substantial knowledge gap. Objective: Determine the association between metabolic syndrome and nodular thyroid disease in a region with adequate iodine intake.Methods: Case-control study. A total of 182 patients referred to radiology to undergo thyroid ultrasonography due to suspicion of thyroid disease. Cases had at least one thyroid nodule greater than 3 mm (n= 91). Controls did not have evidence of thyroid nodules (n= 91). Results: Bivariate analysis showed a significant association between metabolic syndrome and the presence of thyroid nodule (OR 2.56, 95% CI: 1.41-4.66, p <0.05). Low levels of HDL (OR 2.81, 95% CI: 1.54-5.12, p <0.05) and impaired fasting glucose (OR 2.05, 95%CI 1.10 to 3.78, p <0.05) were significantly associated with the presence of thyroid nodule, independent of the presence of metabolic syndrome. Multivariate analysis maintained the association between metabolic syndrome and thyroid nodule with an OR of 2.96 (95%CI 1.47 to 5.95, p <0.05); similarly, the associations of low levels of HDL (OR 2.77, 95%CI 1.44 to 5.3, p <0.05) and impaired fasting glucose (OR 2.23, 95%CI 1.14 to 4.34, p<0.05) with thyroid nodule remained significant.Conclusion: The thyroid nodular disease is associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome, specifically decreased HDL and impaired fasting glucose levels were the factors that increased association was found. ]]> <![CDATA[Trends in cancer incidence in Uruguay: 2002 -2015.]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13933 Uruguay is the south American country which has the highest cancer incidence and mortality rates. The National Cancer Registry collects data on cancer cases nationwide since 1989 and has reached high quality standards in the last decades. This is the first report on incidence trends. Methods: Data from the National Cancer Registry of all new cases of invasive cancer from twelve sites diagnosed in 2002-2015 was analyzed. Age-standardized rates were calculated. Trends of incidence rates were analyzed using joinpoint regression models. Results: For both, men and women, incidence rates trends for all cancer sites, colo-rectal and bladder cancer remained stable. Esophageal and gastric cancers descended while thyroid and kidney cancer incidence increased. In men lung cancer decreased; testicular cancer increased, and prostate cancer increased at the beginning of the period and decreased in the final years. In women, lung cancer increased, breast cancer remained stable and cervical cancer presented a significant decline from 2005 to 2010 and reached a plateau since then.Conclusion: Cancer incidence dynamics are complex and affected not only by Public Health policies such as tobacco control, vaccination and screening programs, but also by environmental and life style changes and the attitude of the medical community towards the application of diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The aim of this paper is to analyze cancer incidence time trends in the country and provide possible explanations to them. ]]> <![CDATA[Risk of infection and disease progression in children exposed to tuberculosis at home, Colombia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13932 To assess the risk of tuberculosis (infection and disease) in children less than 15 years’ old who are household contacts of pulmonary tuberculosis patients in three Colombian cities (Medellín, Cali, and Popayán). Methods: A cohort of 1,040 children household contacts of 380 adults with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was followed up for 24 months. Study period 2005-2009. Results: Tuberculin skin test was positive (≥10 mm) in 43.7% (95% CI: 39.2-48.2). Tuberculin skin test positivity was associated with age 10-14 years (Prevalence Ratio -PR= 1.43, 95% CI: 1.1-1.9), having a BCG vaccine scar (PR= 1.52, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1), underweight, closer proximity to the index case and exposure time >3 months. The annual risk of infection (tuberculin skin test induration increase of 6 mm or more per year) was 17% (95% CI: 11.8-22.2) and was associated with a bacillary load of the adult index case (Relative Risk -RR= 2.12, 95% CI: 1.0-4.3). The incidence rate of active tuberculosis was 12.4 cases per 1,000 persons-year. Children <5 years without BCG vaccine scar had a greater risk of developing active disease (Hazard Ratio -HR= 6.00, 95% CI: 1.3-28.3) than those with scar (HR= 1.33, 95% CI: 0.5-3.4). The risk of developing active tuberculosis augmented along with the increase from initial tuberculin skin test (tuberculin skin test 5-9 mm HR= 8.55, 95% CI: 2.5-29.2; tuberculin skin test ≥10 mm HR= 8.16, 95% CI: 2.0-32.9).Conclusions: There is a need for prompt interruption of adult-to-children tuberculosis transmission within households. Conducting proper contact investigation and offering chemoprophylaxis to infected children could reduce tuberculosis transmission. ]]> <![CDATA[Prevalence of high-grade perineal tear during labor in Mexican adolescents]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c605bb1d5eed0c4847ce7a3

Abstract

Introduction:

There is a high rate of deliveries in adolescents in Mexico. This age group is vulnerable to obstetric complications, including lacerations of the anal sphincter.

Objective:

To determine the prevalence of third and fourth degree perineal tears in adolescents during childbirth, and to evaluate risk factors in comparison with deliveries with lacerations of adult women.

Methods:

All obstetric care episodes were reviewed from a public tertiary hospital data in Monterrey, Mexico in 2014. Age, primiparity, delivery instrumentation, episiotomy, body mass index, product weight and tear´s degree were documented at the deliveries with tears of third and fourth degree.

Results:

The prevalence of third and fourth degree tears of 2.0% was found in the general population, being adolescents the most affected with 2.5%. The unadjusted odds ratio of high-grade tears in adolescent females at delivery, compared to adult females, was 1.36 (95% CI = 0.99-1.86, p= 0.05). No difference was found when comparing risk factors among high-grade tear deliveries in adolescents versus adults.

Conclusions:

A higher prevalence than previous reported for high grade tears during delivery was found. The data suggest adolescence as a risk factor for high-grade tears during delivery.

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<![CDATA[Perme ICU Mobility Score (Perme Score) and the ICU Mobility Scale (IMS): translation and cultural adaptation for the Spanish language]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c605bb5d5eed0c4847ce7e9

Abstract

Introduction:

The scales to measure functional mobility in critically ill patients were developed and validated in English, there is a need for these tools in Spanish speaking countries.

Objective:

To perform translation, cultural adaptation and inter-rater reliability of the Spanish versions of the Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and IMS tools in ICU patients.

Methods:

Translation and validation study between November 2016 and July 2017, following the COSMIN Protocol's recommendations. Two couples of physiotherapists with the role of observer/rater applied both scales in 150 patients upon admission and discharge of a medical-surgical ICU from a private hospital in Colombia. The sample size was defined taking into account the lowest proportion of reported agreement (68.57%), a Kappa index of 0.2784 or higher to ensure that the calculated n was adequate, and a confidence level of 95%

Results:

Translation and cultural adaptation were performed, the final version of both scales in Spanish was approved by the authors. The sample was 150 patients, 52% were men, the average age was 58 ± 17 years, invasive mechanical ventilation was present in 63 (42%) of the cases. Inter-rater reliability of the ICU Mobility Scale was between 0.97 and 1.00, and for the Perme Intensive Care Unit the Mobility Score it was between 0.99 and 1 in the two moments of the measurements.

Conclusions:

Both scales were translated and culturally adapted and presented excellent inter-rater reliability in the two pairs of raters (rater/observer).

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<![CDATA[Prevalence of markers of celiac disease in Colombian children with diabetes mellitus type 1]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c605bb3d5eed0c4847ce7c7

Abstract

Introduction:

Although the association between diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM) and celiac disease (CD) is well established; there are only a few studies that focus on South American children, haplotypes and their possible associations.

Objective:

To determine the prevalence of CD markers in a group of children with T1DM and to analyze the associated clinical, immunological and genetic manifestations.

Methods:

A prevalence study focusing on children with T1DM who were assessed based on variables including sociodemographics, anthropometric information, disease characteristics, laboratory results and family medical history. In partitipants a positive tTG2 (Ig A anti-transglutaminase), a duodenal biopsy and genotype were performed. The proportion of children with T1DM and CD was estimated (CI 95%). Determinations of central tendency, univariate and bivariate analysis, were also performed; p <0.05 was considered significant.

Results:

Thirteen (8.4%) of the 155 children (53.6% girls, 11.0 ±3.6 years, 2-18 years) with T1DM were tTG2 positive, four had CD (2.6%), seven had potential CD (4.5%) and nine were HLA DQ2/DQ8 positive (5.8%). Children with T1DM and CD had their last ketoacidotic episode (21.5 ±30.4 months versus 69.5 ±38.8 months, p= 0.0260) earlier than children with T1DM and potential CD. There were no differences with anthropometry or with the laboratory results regarding glycemic control.

Conclusions:

The prevalence of CD in these children with T1DM is higher than that reported in other South American countries. The prevalence of CD was found to be associated with the time of presentation of T1DM and its main allele, the DQ2/DQ8. These findings are different from what has been described in other places around the world.

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<![CDATA[Cancer incidence estimates and mortality for the top five cancer in Colombia, 2007-2011]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b5b8dae463d7e1effa46103

Abstract

Objectives:

To describe the incidence and mortality for the five main types of cancer in Colombia, from 2007-2011.

Methods:

We estimated cases and cancer incidence rates standardised by age, based on incidence/mortality ratios; and we calculated the observed deaths and mortality rates standardised by age in Colombia, both differentiated by province, type of cancer and sex. Incidence estimates were generated based on information from four cancer population registries (Cali, Pasto, Bucaramanga and Manizales), published in Cancer Incidence in Five Continents, volume X, and the official mortality and population information of the National Administrative Province of Statistics (DANE, for its initials in Spanish).

Results:

The annual number of expected cases (all cancers) was 62,818 in men and women; and there were 32,653 recorded deaths. The main incidental cancers were prostate (46.5 per 100,000 person-years) in men, and breast (33.8 per 100,000 person-years) in women. The highest mortality figures were for stomach cancer in men (14.2); and breast cancer in women (9.9).

Conclusions:

The highest incidence and mortality estimates in Colombia were for breast and prostate cancers, as well as a proportion of infection-related cancers, such as stomach and cervical cancer. These four neoplasms were responsible for more than 50% of the burden of the disease. Only through good quality, long-duration cancer registries, can information be obtained about the changes in incidence trends.

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