ResearchPad - australasia https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Evolutionary relationships and population genetics of the Afrotropical leaf-nosed bats (, )]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_12535 The Old World leaf-nosed bats () are aerial and gleaning insectivores that occur throughout the Paleotropics. Both their taxonomic and phylogenetic histories are confused. Until recently, the family included genera now allocated to the and was recognized as a subfamily of . Evidence that diverged from both and in the Eocene confirmed their family rank, but their intrafamilial relationships remain poorly resolved. We examined genetic variation in the Afrotropical hipposiderids , , and using relatively dense taxon-sampling throughout East Africa and neighboring regions. Variation in both mitochondrial (cyt-b) and four nuclear intron sequences (ACOX2, COPS, ROGDI, STAT5) were analyzed using both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. We used intron sequences and the lineage delimitation method BPP—a multilocus, multi-species coalescent approach—on supported mitochondrial clades to identify those acting as independent evolutionary lineages. The program StarBEAST was used on the intron sequences to produce a species tree of the sampled Afrotropical hipposiderids. All genetic analyses strongly support generic monophyly, with and as Afrotropical sister genera distinct from a Paleotropical ; mitochondrial analyses interpose the genera , , and between these clades. Mitochondrial analyses also suggest at least two separate colonizations of Africa by Asian groups of , but the actual number and direction of faunal interchanges will hinge on placement of the unsampled African-Arabian species . Mitochondrial sequences further identify a large number of geographically structured clades within species of all three genera. However, in sharp contrast to this pattern, the four nuclear introns fail to distinguish many of these groups and their geographic structuring disappears. Various distinctive mitochondrial clades are consolidated in the intron-based gene trees and delimitation analyses, calling into question their evolutionary independence or else indicating their very recent divergence. At the same time, there is now compelling genetic evidence in both mitochondrial and nuclear sequences for several additional unnamed species among the Afrotropical . Conflicting appraisals of differentiation among the Afrotropical hipposiderids based on mitochondrial and nuclear loci must be adjudicated by large-scale integrative analyses of echolocation calls, quantitative morphology, and geometric morphometrics. Integrative analyses will also help to resolve the challenging taxonomic issues posed by the diversification of the many lineages associated with and .

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<![CDATA[A second remarkable case of parapatry in a Tasmanian millipede genus (, , )]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_9854 Verhoeff, 1936 and Mesibov, 2010 are parapatric in northeast Tasmania, Australia. The parapatric boundary is ca 50 km long and mainly follows streamlines. Three sections of the boundary were intensively sampled. Two gonopod variants of also appear to be parapatric.

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<![CDATA[A new species of Cosmocerca (Nematoda, Ascaridomorpha) from the marine toad Rhinella marina (Linnaeus) (Anura, Bufonidae) in Australia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N7a14b3be-aba0-4af5-ad31-a88403016a0f

Abstract

The marine toad Rhinella marina (Linnaeus) (Anura, Bufonidae) is a notorious, exotic amphibian species in Australia. However, our present knowledge of the composition of the nematode fauna of R. marina is still not complete. In the present study, a new cosmocercid nematode, Cosmocerca multipapillatasp. nov., was described using both light and scanning electron microscopy, based on specimens collected from R. marina in Australia. Cosmocerca multipapillatasp. nov. can be easily distinguished from its congeners by the body size, the presence of lateral alae and well sclerotized gubernaculum, the number and arrangement of plectanes and rosettes and the length of spicules, oesophagus and tail.

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<![CDATA[Review and new species of Tiferonia Darlington, 1962 (Carabidae, Abacetini)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N7c2b680c-588e-4044-a19c-a79031b8521f
Abstract

Darlington described Tiferonia based on T. parva from New Guinea. In this review, Tiferonia leytensissp. nov. is described from Leyte Island, Philippines, Tiferonia schoutedeni (Straneo, 1943) comb. nov. is transferred from Melanchrous Andrewes, and inclusion of Tiferonia brunnea (Jedlička, 1935) in the genus is confirmed. Characteristics of Tiferonia and genera that have been proposed as closely related to Tiferonia are discussed and a unique character, the post-ocular sulcus, shared among species of Tiferonia and Holconotus is proposed as a synapomorphy for these two genera. A key to identify adults of the four species of Tiferonia is provided.

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<![CDATA[Taxonomic revision of Australian Copelatus Erichson, 1832 (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nf20c5ad2-2bb3-4a6b-8691-72090d0916a5
Abstract

The genus Copelatus in Australia is revised and nine species are recognised. One new species, Copelatus martinbaehrisp. nov., is described from Papua New Guinea (Central Province) and Cape York Peninsula (Iron Range NP and Mt Tozer). Copelatus divisus Watts, 1978, syn. nov., is considered a junior synonym of C. portior Guignot, 1956, described from New Guinea. Species delimitation is based on the morphological characters and Cox1 data. All species are (re)described, and their important species characters (median lobes, parameres, habitus and colour patterns) are illustrated. A key to all nine species is provided. The known distribution and habitat preferences of each species are outlined briefly. In Australia, all nine species are distributed in the northern half of the continent. Four species are also reported from New Guinea: in addition to C. martinbaehrisp. nov., we record C. clarki Sharp, 1882 for the first time from southern New Guinea, and consider literature records of C. irregularis W.J. Macleay, 1871 and C. marginatus Sharp, 1882 from New Guinea as doubtful. Copelatus portior is widely distributed in Australasia, while C. tenebrosus is widely distributed in the Indomalayan and Australasian realms. All Australian Copelatus are confirmed to be lentic, found in a large variety of stagnant water, mainly in lowland areas up to 250 m.

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<![CDATA[Three new “caecate” earthworm species from Sulawesi, Indonesia (Oligochaeta, Megascolecidae)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c2a795ed5eed0c48422e1d0
Abstract

Three new earthworm species are described from Sulawesi, Indonesia. Two belong to the genus Pithemera Sims & Easton, 1972, namely P.suwastikai Fahri, Amaliah & Atmowidi, sp. n. and P.tadulako Fahri, Amaliah & Atmowidi, sp. n. The new species, P.suwastikaisp. n. is distinguished by a medium size (135–165 mm long, 4.5–6.5 mm diameter), four pairs of spermathecal pores in 5/6/7/8/9, 7–12 setae between male pores, no genital markings, holandry, and simple intestinal caeca. Pithemeratadulakosp. n. is recognized by a large size (217–340 mm long, 13–15 mm diameter), two pairs of spermathecal pores in 7/8/9, no setae between male pores, no genital markings, holandry, and simple intestinal caeca. Another new species, Metaphirerusydii Fahri, Amaliah & Nguyen, sp. n., is diagnosed by its large size (250–280 mm long,12–16 mm diameter), two pairs of spermathecal pores in 7/8/9, no setae between male porophores, presence of genital markings in the male region, holandry, and complex intestinal caeca. Additionally, an identification key to “caecate” species is provided to the Sulawesi’s fauna.

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<![CDATA[Sponsor Acknowledgement]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5ca7a627d5eed0c484f44ad8 ]]> <![CDATA[Saturday 30 March, 2019]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5ca7a625d5eed0c484f44a8b ]]> <![CDATA[Reviewer Acknowledgement]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5ca7a621d5eed0c484f44a0e ]]> <![CDATA[Student Conference ePosters]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5ca7a623d5eed0c484f44a2f ]]>