ResearchPad - autoantibodies https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Influence of total western diet on docosahexaenoic acid suppression of silica-triggered lupus flaring in NZBWF1 mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14732 Lupus is a debilitating multi-organ autoimmune disease clinically typified by periods of flare and remission. Exposing lupus-prone female NZBWF1 mice to crystalline silica (cSiO2), a known human autoimmune trigger, mimics flaring by inducing interferon-related gene (IRG) expression, inflammation, ectopic lymphoid structure (ELS) development, and autoantibody production in the lung that collectively accelerate glomerulonephritis. cSiO2-triggered flaring in this model can be prevented by supplementing mouse diet with the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A limitation of previous studies was the use of purified diet that, although optimized for rodent health, does not reflect the high American intake of saturated fatty acid (SFA), ω-6 PUFAs, and total fat. To address this, we employed here a modified Total Western Diet (mTWD) emulating the 50th percentile U.S. macronutrient distribution to discern how DHA supplementation and/or SFA and ω-6 reduction influences cSiO2-triggered lupus flaring in female NZBWF1 mice. Six-week-old mice were fed isocaloric experimental diets for 2 wks, intranasally instilled with cSiO2 or saline vehicle weekly for 4 wks, and tissues assessed for lupus endpoints 11 wks following cSiO2 instillation. In mice fed basal mTWD, cSiO2 induced robust IRG expression, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine elevation, leukocyte infiltration, ELS neogenesis, and autoantibody production in the lung, as well as early kidney nephritis onset compared to vehicle-treated mice fed mTWD. Consumption of mTWD containing DHA at the caloric equivalent to a human dose of 5 g/day dramatically suppressed induction of all lupus-associated endpoints. While decreasing SFA and ω-6 in mTWD modestly inhibited some disease markers, DHA addition to this diet was required for maximal protection against lupus development. Taken together, DHA supplementation at a translationally relevant dose was highly effective in preventing cSiO2-triggered lupus flaring in NZBWF1 mice, even against the background of a typical Western diet.

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<![CDATA[Elevated levels of autoantibodies against EXD2 and PHAX in the sera of patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dca33d5eed0c48452a8b5

While circulating autoantibodies have been detected in patients with several cardiovascular diseases, such studies have not been performed for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Here we investigated the production of certain auto-antibodies in CTEPH patients. Initial screening was performed in 5 CTEPH patients and 5 healthy donors (HDs) using a ProtoArray Human Protein Microarray v5.1 containing 9,375 human proteins, and we selected 34 antigens recognized by IgG antibodies more strongly in the sera of CTEPH patients than in the sera of HDs. In subsequent second/third analyses, we validated the auto-antibody level using amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay-linked immunosorbent assay (AlphaLISA) in 96 CTEPH patients and 96 HDs as follows: At the second screening, we used 63 crude peptides derived from those selected 34 antigens and found that the serum levels of autoantibodies for 4 peptides seemed higher in CTEPH patients than in HDs. In third analysis, we used the purified peptides of those selected in second screening and found that serum antibodies against peptides derived from exonuclease 3'-5' domain-containing 2 (EXD2) and phosphorylated adaptor for RNA export (PHAX) were significantly higher in CTEPH patients than in HDs. The serum antibody levels to these antigens were also elevated in PAH patients. The titers against EXD2 peptide decreased after surgical treatment in CTEPH patients. These autoantibodies may be useful as biomarkers of CTEPH and PAH, and further investigations may provide novel insight into the etiology.

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<![CDATA[Analysis of serum Hsp90 as a potential biomarker of β cell autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c40f77ad5eed0c484386221

Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a protein chaperone that is upregulated and released from pancreatic β cells under pro-inflammatory conditions. We hypothesized that serum Hsp90 may have utility as a biomarker of type 1 diabetes risk and exhibit elevations before the onset of clinically significant hyperglycemia. To this end, total levels of the alpha cytoplasmic isoform of Hsp90 were assayed in autoantibody-positive progressors to type 1 diabetes using banked serum samples from the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention Cohort that had been collected 12 months prior to diabetes onset, with comparison to age, sex, and BMI-category matched autoantibody-positive nonprogressors and healthy controls. Hsp90 levels were higher in autoantibody-positive progressors and nonprogressors ≤ 18 years of age compared to matched healthy controls. However, Hsp90 levels were not different between progressors and nonprogressors in any age group. Hsp90 was positively correlated with age in control subjects, but this correlation was absent in autoantibody positive individuals. In aggregate these data indicate that elevated Hsp90 levels are present in youth with β cell autoimmunity, but are not able to distinguish youth or adult type 1 diabetes progressors from nonprogressors in samples collected 12 months prior to diabetes development.

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<![CDATA[Epitope specificity of anti-synapsin autoantibodies: Differential targeting of synapsin I domains]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c1c0b14d5eed0c4844273ef

Objective

To identify the specific domains of the presynaptic protein synapsin targeted by recently described autoantibodies to synapsin.

Methods

Sera of 20 and CSF of two patients with different psychiatric and neurological disorders previously tested positive for immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies to full-length synapsin were screened for IgG against synapsin I domains using HEK293 cells transfected with constructs encoding different domains of rat synapsin Ia. Additionally, IgG subclasses were determined using full-length synapsin Ia. Serum and CSF from one patient were also screened for IgA autoantibodies to synapsin I domains. Sera from nine and CSF from two healthy subjects were analyzed as controls.

Results

IgG in serum from 12 of 20 IgG synapsin full-length positive patients, but from none of the healthy controls, bound to synapsin domains. Of these 12 sera, six bound to the A domain, five to the D domain, and one to the B- (and possibly A-), D-, and E-domains of synapsin I. IgG antibodies to the D-domain were also detected in one of the CSF samples. Determination of IgG subclasses detected IgG1 in two sera and one CSF, IgG2 in none of the samples, IgG3 in two sera, and IgG4 in eight sera. One patient known to be positive for IgA antibodies to full-length synapsin had IgA antibodies to the D-domain in serum and CSF.

Conclusions

Anti-synapsin autoantibodies preferentially bind to either the A- or the D-domain of synapsin I.

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<![CDATA[Alpha7 acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies are rare in sera of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c12cf6bd5eed0c4849145a3

The α7 acetylcholine receptor (AChR) has been linked with the onset of psychotic symptoms and we hypothesized therefore that it might also be an autoimmune target. Here, we describe a new radioimmunoassay (RIA) using iodine 125-labelled α-bungarotoxin and membrane extract from transfected HEK293 cells expressing human α7 AChR. This RIA was used to analyze sera pertaining to a cohort of 711 subjects, comprising 368 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, 140 with bipolar disorder, 58 individuals diagnosed of other mental disorders, and 118 healthy comparison subjects. We identified one patient whose serum tested positive although with very low levels (0.2 nM) for α7 AChR-specific antibodies by RIA. Three out of 711 sera contained antibodies against iodine 125-labelled α-bungarotoxin, because they precipitated with it in the absence of α7 AChR. This first evidence suggests that autoantibodies against α7 AChR are absent or very rare in these clinical groups.

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<![CDATA[A set of conformationally well-defined L/D-peptide epitopes provides a serological bar code for autoantibody subtypes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b6dda0f463d7e7491b405e9

Which conformational parameters lead to an antibody-affine peptide antigen? And in how many different conformations can we actually present the respective conformational epitope? To provide answers from a chemical point of view, we direct the bending and tethering of peptide backbones by the utilisation of a hydrophobic cluster, disulfides, and d-amino acids. Each mutation is employed pairwise on directly opposite sides of a β-hairpin. In combination, these synthetic modules guide the formation of complementary β-sheet-like structures, whereby the oppositely configured (l/d-)bi-disulfide pairs form with high regioselectivity. The conformational properties of the peptides are assessed by NMR spectroscopy and correlated with their antibody affinity in ELISA. From a pool of thus designed peptide antigens with distinctive complementary affinities against known rheumatoid arthritis (RA) autoantibodies, we select a set of epitopes for an immunoassay with sera of RA patients. We want to put emphasis on the idea, that the different conformational properties of the chosen antigens, containing the same epitope sequence, are mirrored in the distribution of autoantibody subtypes (or of the antibody polyclonality, respectively). Such directly comparable information can only be delivered by a set of peptides, rather than a single one. The hairpin-restriction technology of l/d-configured bi-disulfide amino acid pairs is not limited to RA but applicable to other shape-persistent hairpin motifs which are supposed to identify subgroups of protein receptors.

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<![CDATA[Novel Phospholipid-Protein Conjugates Allow Improved Detection of Antibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da00ab0ee8fa60b73d08

Reliable measurement of clinically relevant autoimmune antibodies toward phospholipid-protein conjugates is highly desirable in research and clinical assays. To date, the development in this field has been limited to the use of natural heterogeneous antigens. However, this approach does not take structural features of biologically active antigens into account and leads to low reliability and poor scientific test value. Here we describe novel phospholipid-protein conjugates for specific detection of human autoimmune antibodies. Our synthetic approach includes mild oxidation of synthetic phospholipid cardiolipin, and as the last step, coupling of the product with azide-containing linker and copper-catalyzed click chemistry with β2-glycoprotein I and prothrombin. To prove utility of the product antigens, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and three cohorts of samples obtained from patients in Denmark (n = 34) and the USA (n = 27 and n = 14). Afterwards we analyzed correlation of the obtained autoantibody titers with clinical parameters for each patient. Our results prove that using novel antigens clinically relevant autoantibodies can be detected with high repeatability, sensitivity and specificity. Unlike previously used antigens the obtained autoantibody titers strongly correlate with high disease activity and in particular, with arthritis, renal involvement, anti-Smith antibodies and high lymphocyte count. Importantly, chemical composition of antigens has a strong influence on the correlation of detected autoantibodies with disease activity and manifestations. This confirms the crucial importance of antigens’ composition on research and diagnostic assays, and opens up exciting perspectives for synthetic antigens in future studies of autoimmunity.

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<![CDATA[Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) Cells Are Impaired in Th17 Associated Primary and Secondary Immunodeficiencies]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da80ab0ee8fa60b9a66e

The recently described Mucosal Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells mediate specific recognition of bacterial and fungal vitamin B2 metabolites. As innate T cells, they possess broad effector responses, including IFN- including Iproduction, that are comparable to conventional T cell responses. Immunodeficiencies associated with systemic Th17 deficiency may also be compounded by defects in MAIT immunity. We evaluated Th17 immunity in this innate T cell compartment in primary (AD-HIES) and secondary immunodeficiency (thymoma) patients with conventional Th17 deficiency and susceptibility to fungal and bacterial disease. Our results suggest that MAIT cells are both reduced and functional deficient in STAT3 deficiency and thymoma patients with IL-12/23 autoantibodies. In contrast, thymoma patients without autoantibodies preserved the normal number and functional MAIT cells.

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<![CDATA[Analysis of Associations of Human BAFF Gene Polymorphisms with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da8fab0ee8fa60b9f8be

Background

The B-lymphocyte-activating factor (BAFF) is associated with B-cell functions, and gene polymorphisms of the BAFF have been linked to autoimmune diseases (AIDs). In this study, we explored possible associations of two BAFF single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1041569 and rs2893321, with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) in an ethnic Chinese population.

Material and Methods

In total, 319 Graves’ disease (GD), 83 Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT) patients, and 369 healthy controls were enrolled. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and direct sequencing were used to genotype rs2893321 and rs1041569.

Results

There was a significant difference in frequencies of the G allele and AG+GG genotype of rs2893321 between the GD and control groups (p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR) = 0.76, and p = 0.017, OR = 0.68, respectively) and between the AITD and control groups (p = 0.009, OR = 0.76, and, p = 0.014, OR = 0.69, respectively). The AA genotype of rs2893321 was associated with low titers of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (TSHRAb) (p = 0.015) in males but not in females. The AA genotype of rs2893321 was associated with the presence of two different types of thyroid autoantibody (TAb) (TSHRAb and Hashimoto’s autoantibody (anti-thyroglobulin or anti-microsomal antibody)) in females and with that of one type in males.

Conclusions

rs2893321 may be a susceptible genetic variant for the development of GD and AITDs. Associations of rs2893321 with susceptibility to GD and AITDs and the correlation between rs2893321 and TAb exhibit a dimorphic pattern. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to confirm our findings.

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<![CDATA[Serological and Genetic Evidence for Altered Complement System Functionality in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Findings of the GAPAID Consortium]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da76ab0ee8fa60b96922

Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with multifactorial ethiopathogenesis. The complement system is involved in both the early and late stages of disease development and organ damage. To better understand autoantibody mediated complement consumption we examined ex vivo immune complex formation on autoantigen arrays. We recruited patients with SLE (n = 211), with other systemic autoimmune diseases (n = 65) and non-autoimmune control subjects (n = 149). Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected and serum complement levels were determined. The genotype of SNP rs1143679 in the ITGAM gene was also determined. Ex vivo formation of immune complexes, with respect to IgM, IgG, complement C4 and C3 binding, was examined using a functional immunoassay on autoantigen microarray comprising nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Complement consumption of nucleic acids increased upon binding of IgM and IgG even when serum complement levels were decreased due to consumption in SLE patients. A negative correlation between serum complement levels and ex vivo complement deposition on nucleic acid autoantigens is demonstrated. On the contrary, complement deposition on tested protein and lipid autoantigens showed positive correlation with C4 levels. Genetic analysis revealed that the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 in complement receptor type 3 is associated with an increased production of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies. Notwithstanding, homozygous carriers of the previously reported susceptible allele (AA) had lower levels of dsDNA specific IgM among SLE patients. Both the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 and the high ratio of nucleic acid specific IgG/IgM were associated with multiple organ involvement. In summary, secondary complement deficiency in SLE does not impair opsonization of nucleic-acid-containing autoantigens but does affect other antigens and potentially other complement dependent processes. Dysfunction of the receptor recognizing complement opsonized immune complexes promotes the development of class-switched autoantibodies targeting nucleic acids.

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<![CDATA[Retrospective Study of Phospholipase A2 Receptor and IgG Subclasses in Glomerular Deposits in Chinese Patients with Membranous Nephropathy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daceab0ee8fa60bb538b

Background and objectives

The research work in the past years showed that detection of phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) antigen and its dominant IgG4 autoantibody in glomerular deposits of patients with membranous nephropathy (MN) was useful for the differentiation between primary MN (PMN) and secondary MN (SMN), but so far such research data from large Chinese patient series is little. Here, we are going to report a research work in a Chinese cohort.

Design, setting, participants, & measurements

This study enrolled 179 patients with PMN, 40 patients with membranous lupus nephritis (LN-MN), 26 patients with hepatitis B virus-associated MN (HBV-MN), 2 patients with malignancy-associated MN (M-MN) and one patient with IgG4-related MN (IgG4-MN). PLA2R and IgG subclasses in glomerular deposits of these patients were examined by immunofluorescence and/or immunohistochemical staining, and the potential value of the above examinations for differential diagnosis of PMN and SMN was evaluated.

Results

Glomerular PLA2R deposition was present in 92.2% patients with PMN and 7.7% patients with HBV-MN, but none of the patients with LN-MN. Predominant/codominant IgG4 deposition was found in 93.3% patients with PMN and 11.5% patients with HBV-MN, but none of the patients with LN-MN. The two M-MN patients both had glomerular PLA2R and predominant/codominant IgG4 deposition. The one IgG4-MN patient had deeply staining IgG4 but no PLA2R in glomeruli.

Conclusions

The glomerular PLA2R and predominant/codominant IgG4 deposition is frequently observed in Chinese patients with PMN. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical staining of renal biopsy tissue for detection of glomerular PLA2R and IgG subclasses deposition can help to distinguish PMN from LN-MN and most of HBV-MN.

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<![CDATA[Identification of Stages of Erythroid Differentiation in Bone Marrow and Erythrocyte Subpopulations in Blood Circulation that Are Preferentially Lost in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Mouse]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e5ab0ee8fa60b6addf

Repeated weekly injections of rat erythrocytes produced autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in C57BL/6 mice after 5–6 weeks. Using the double in vivo biotinylation (DIB) technique, recently developed in our laboratory, turnover of erythrocyte cohorts of different age groups during AIHA was monitored. Results indicate a significant decline in the proportion of reticulocytes, young and intermediate age groups of erythrocytes, but a significant increase in the proportion of old erythrocytes in blood circulation. Binding of the autoantibody was relatively higher to the young erythrocytes and higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also seen in these cells. Erythropoietic activity in the bone marrows and the spleen of AIHA induced mice was examined by monitoring the relative proportion of erythroid cells at various stages of differentiation in these organs. Cells at different stages of differentiation were enumerated flow cytometrically by double staining with anti-Ter119 and anti-transferrin receptor (CD71) monoclonal antibodies. Erythroid cells in bone marrow declined significantly in AIHA induced mice, erythroblast C being most affected (50% decline). Erythroblast C also recorded high intracellular ROS level along with increased levels of membrane-bound autoantibody. No such decline was observed in spleen. A model of AIHA has been proposed indicating that binding of autoantibodies may not be a sufficient condition for destruction of erythroid cells in bone marrow and in blood circulation. Last stage of erythropoietic differentiation in bone marrow and early stages of erythrocytes in blood circulation are specifically susceptible to removal in AIHA.

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<![CDATA[Lower Frequency of HLA-DRB1 Type 1 Diabetes Risk Alleles in Pediatric Patients with MODY]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da41ab0ee8fa60b89e87

Objective

The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes in a cohort of pediatric patients with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of MODY.

Materials and Methods

160 families with a proband diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 74 families with a molecular diagnosis of MODY (61 GCK-MODY and 13 HNF1A-MODY) were categorized at high definition for HLA-DRB1 locus. According to the presence or absence of the susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes, we considered three different HLA-DRB1 genotypes: 0 risk alleles (no DR3 no DR4); 1 risk allele (DR3 or DR4); 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4).

Results

Compared with type 1 diabetes, patients with MODY carried higher frequency of 0 risk alleles, OR 22.7 (95% CI: 10.7–48.6) and lower frequency of 1 or 2 risk alleles, OR 0.53 (95% CI: 0.29–0.96) and OR 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02–0.18), respectively.

Conclusions

The frequency of HLA-DRB1 risk alleles for type 1 diabetes is significantly lower in patients with MODY. In children and adolescents with diabetes, the presence of 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4) reduces the probability of MODY diagnosis, whereas the lack of risk alleles increases it. Therefore, we might consider that HLA-DRB1 provides additional information for the selection of patients with high probability of monogenic diabetes.

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<![CDATA[A predictive model for lack of partial clinical remission in new-onset pediatric type 1 diabetes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db59ab0ee8fa60bdf18a

Importance

>50% of patients with new-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D) do not enter partial clinical remission (PCR); early identification of these patients may improve initial glycemic control and reduce long-term complications.

Aim

To determine whether routinely obtainable clinical parameters predict non-remission in children and adolescents with new-onset T1D.

Subjects and methods

Data on remission were collected for the first 36 months of disease in 204 subjects of ages 2–14 years with new-onset type 1 diabetes. There were 86 remitters (age 9.1±3.0y; male 57%), and 118 non-remitters (age 7.0±3.1y; male 40.7%). PCR was defined as insulin-dose adjusted hemoglobin A1c of ≤9.

Results

Non-remission occurred in 57.8% of subjects. Univariable analysis showed that the risk for non-remission was increased 9-fold in patients with 4 diabetes-associated auto-antibodies (OR = 9.90, p = 0.010); 5-fold in patients <5 years old (odds ratio = 5.38, p = 0.032), 3-fold in those with bicarbonate of <15 mg/dL at diagnosis (OR = 3.71, p = 0.008). Combined estimates of risk potential for HC03 and the number of autoantibodies by multivariable analysis, adjusted for BMI standard deviation score, showed HC03 <15 mg/dL with a clinically significant 10-fold risk (OR = 10.1, p = 0.074); and the number of autoantibodies with a 2-fold risk for non-remission (OR = 1.9, p = 0.105). Male sex and older age were associated with decreased risk for non-remission. A receiver-operating characteristic curve model depicting sensitivity by 1-specificity for non-remission as predicted by bicarbonate <15 mg/dL, age <5y, female sex, and >3 diabetes-associated autoantibodies had an area under the curve of 0.73.

Conclusions

More than 50% of children and adolescents with new-onset T1D do not undergo partial clinical remission and are thus at an increased risk for long-term complications of diabetes mellitus. A predictive model comprising of bicarbonate <15 mg/dL, age <5y, female sex, and >3 diabetes-associated autoantibodies has 73% power for correctly predicting non-remission in children and adolescents with new-onset T1D. Early identification of these non-remitters may guide the institution of targeted therapy to limit dysglycemia and reduce the prevalence of long-term deleterious complications.

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<![CDATA[Regulatory CD4+ T-Cell Subsets and Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibody Repertoire: Potential Biomarkers for Arthritis Development in Seropositive Arthralgia Patients?]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da45ab0ee8fa60b8b67f

Objective

Seropositive arthralgia patients (SAP) are at high risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This prospective study aimed to determine whether altered peripheral regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and defined subsets, besides a broadened anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) response, may qualify as biomarkers for RA development in SAP.

Methods

Thirty-four consecutive SAP were prospectively assessed every 6 months for minimally 2 years. At inclusion, peripheral Treg (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) numbers and subsets, defined as CD45RA+FoxP3low naive Tregs (Fr I), CD45RA-FoxP3high activated Tregs (Fr II) and CD45RA-FoxP3low non-Tregs (Fr III), were compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC, n = 16) and treatment-naive RA patients (n = 12). SAP that developed RA were compared to non-switchers and analyzed for Treg numbers and Treg subsets at inclusion. Also, Treg numbers and subsets were compared in switched SAP before and at diagnosis. To assess the ACPA repertoire, IgG and IgA reactivity was measured against citrullinated peptides from fibrinogen, α-enolase and vimentin.

Results

Treg numbers were similar between HC, SAP and RA patients. Although the bonafide Treg subsets Fr I and Fr II were comparable between groups, Fr III was increased in SAP compared to HC (p = 0.01). Fourteen (41%) SAP developed RA during follow-up. Their Treg numbers and subsets were comparable to non-switched SAP. At RA diagnosis, Treg numbers in switched SAP were similar to 6 months before. Switched SAP displayed a more diverse IgG ACPA repertoire compared to non-switched SAP (p = 0.046) and showed more IgA reactivity than non-switched SAP reaching significance for Fib1 only (p = 0.047).

Conclusion

Numbers of Total Treg and bonafide Treg subsets are not indicative for RA development in SAP, opposed to the ACPA repertoire.

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<![CDATA[Antibodies against Native and Oxidized Cardiolipin and Phosphatidylserine and Phosphorylcholine in Atherosclerosis Development]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f6ab0ee8fa60b7031c

Background

Antibodies against cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine (anti-CL and anti-PS) are associated with thrombosis. In contrast, we determined that IgM antibodies against oxidized CL and PS (OxCL and OxPS) and phosphorylcholine (anti-PC) could be protection markers for cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Methods

226 individuals with established hypertension (diastolic pressure>95 mmHg) from the European Lacidipine Study on Atherosclerosis. Antibodies were tested by ELISA. As a surrogate measure of atherosclerosis, the mean of the maximum intima-media thicknesses (IMT) in the far walls of common carotids and bifurcations was determined by ultrasonography at the time of inclusion and 4 years following inclusion.

Results

Increases in IMT measures at follow-up were significantly less common in subjects which at baseline had high IgM anti-OxPS and anti-PC at above 75th percentile: OR 0,45, CI (0,23–0,86) and OR 0.37, CI (0,19–0,71), p = 0.0137 respectively and above 90th percentile: OR 0.32, CI (0,12–0,84) and OR 0.39, CI (0,15–1.00), p = 0.050 and OR 0,22, CI (0,08–0,59) p = 0,0029. IgM anti-OxCL was negatively associated with IMT increases (OR, 0.32, CI (0,12–0,84), p = 0231). There were no associations for IgM anti-PS or anti-CL. Anti-PC, as determined herein by a commercial ELISA, was strongly associated with data from our previously published in house ELISA (R = 0,87; p<0,0001).) Anti-PC was also a risk marker at low levels (below 25th percentile; OR = 2,37 (1,16–4,82), p = 0,0177).

Conclusions

High levels of IgM anti-OxPS and anti-OxCL, but not traditional anti-phospholipid antibodies (anti-PS and anti-CL), are associated with protection against atherosclerosis development. In addition, low IgM anti-PC was a risk marker but high a protection marker.

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<![CDATA[Clinical Utility of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Anti-Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 Autoantibodies]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e6ab0ee8fa60b6b4ae

Objective

Autoantibodies to melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are specifically expressed in patients with dermatomyositis (DM) and are associated with a subset of DM patients with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD). Here, we examined the clinical utility of a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for detecting these antibodies.

Methods

Here we developed an improved ELISA for detecting anti-MDA5 antibodies. We then performed a multicenter clinical study involving 8 medical centers and enrolled 242 adult patients with polymyositis (PM)/DM, 190 with non-PM/DM connective tissue disease (CTD), 154 with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), and 123 healthy controls. Anti-MDA5 antibodies in the patients’ serum samples were quantified using our newly developed ELISA, and the results were compared to those obtained using the gold-standard immunoprecipitation (IP) assay. In addition, correlations between the ELISA-quantified anti-MDA5 antibodies and clinical characteristics were evaluated.

Results

In patients with PM/DM, the anti-MDA5 antibody measurements obtained from the ELISA and IP assay were highly concordant; the ELISA exhibited an analytical sensitivity of 98.2%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100%, and negative predictive value of 99.5% (compared to the IP assay). Anti-MDA5 antibodies were detected in 22.7% of the DM patients, but not in any of the patients with PM, non-PM/DM CTD, or IIP. Clinically amyopathic DM, RP-ILD, arthritis, and fever were more prevalent in DM patients who were anti-MDA5 antibody-positive than in those who were antibody-negative (P ≤ 0.0002 for all comparisons). In addition, anti-MDA5 antibody-positive patients with RP-ILD exhibited higher antibody levels than those without RP-ILD (P = 0.006).

Conclusion

Our newly developed ELISA can detect anti-MDA5 antibodies as efficiently as the gold standard IP assay and has the potential to facilitate the routine clinical measurement of anti-MDA5 antibodies in patients who suspected to have DM.

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<![CDATA[Anti-Carbamylated Protein Antibodies as a Reproducible Independent Type of Rheumatoid Arthritis Autoantibodies]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da39ab0ee8fa60b87312

A large fraction of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develop specific autoantibodies, which until recently were only of two types, rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). We aimed to replicate important findings about a recently described third type of specific autoantibodies, anti-carbamylated protein (anti-CarP) antibodies, because they have been described based only in the homemade ELISA from a single laboratory. Our study included 520 patients with established RA and 278 healthy controls of Spanish ancestry and it was done with an independently performed ELISA. The prevalence and pattern of environmental, clinical and genetic associations of the anti-CarP antibodies were similar to the previously described. Notably, the presence and titers of anti-CarP correlated with the presence and titers of ACPA, but the anti-CarP antibodies did not share the known genetic and exposure risk factors of the ACPA. In addition, anti-CarP antibodies were independently associated with a higher (10.5%) prevalence of bone erosions. The reproducibility of these characteristics across laboratories and European subpopulations, indicates the wide validity of the results and suggests that determination of anti-CarP antibodies could contribute to explain RA pathogenesis and identify clinically relevant patient subgroups.

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<![CDATA[Autoantibodies against the Second Extracellular Loop of M3R Do neither Induce nor Indicate Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9d7ab0ee8fa60b663c9

Objectives

Anti-muscarinic acetylcholine type-3 receptor (anti-M3R) autoantibodies have been suggested to be pathogenic for primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), and the second extracellular loop of M3R is suspected to carry a disease-promoting epitope. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the pathogenicity of autoantibodies against peptides derived from the second extracellular loop of M3R in mice and to determine whether those autoantibodies could be used as biomarker for pSS.

Methods

BALB/c mice were immunized with modified linear or cyclic peptides of the second extracellular loop of M3R. The function of exocrine glands was evaluated by measuring the secretion of saliva and tears. The histological evaluations were performed by using H&E staining or direct immunofluorescence staining. Autoantibodies against linear or cyclic peptides of the second extracellular loop of M3R in human and mice were determined using ELISA.

Results

Immunization induced mice to produce autoantibodies against the linear or cyclic peptides of the second extracellular loop of M3R, and those autoantibodies could bind onto salivary glands. However, those mice showed neither impairment in the secretion of tears or saliva nor histological abnormality in the exocrine glands. Furthermore, passive transfer of the IgG isolated from the immunized mice into healthy mice did not induced the dysfunction of the exocrine glands. The prevalence of autoantibodies against the peptides of the second extracellular loop of M3R was low in pSS patients, and it did not differ significantly from that in healthy controls.

Conclusions

Our results suggest that the autoantibodies against peptides of the second extracellular loop of M3R are not pathogenic in vivo and they are not suitable as biomarkers for pSS diagnosis.

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<![CDATA[Clinical Features of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia with Systemic Sclerosis-Related Autoantibody in Comparison with Interstitial Pneumonia with Systemic Sclerosis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da71ab0ee8fa60b951b9

Background

Patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias sometimes have a few features of connective tissue disease (CTD) and yet do not fulfil the diagnostic criteria for any specific CTD.

Objective

This study was conducted to elucidate the characteristics, prognosis, and disease behavior in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc)-related autoantibodies.

Methods

We retrospectively analyzed medical records of 72 ILD patients: 40 patients with SSc (SSc-ILD) and 32 patients with SSc-related autoantibody-positive ILD but not with CTD (ScAb-ILD), indicating lung-dominant CTD with SSc-related autoantibody.

Results

Patients with SSc-ILD were predominantly females and non-smokers, and most had nonspecific interstitial pneumonia confirmed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pathological analysis. However, about half of the patients with ScAb-ILD were male and current or ex-smokers. On HRCT analysis, honeycombing was more predominant in patients with ScAb-ILD than with SSc-ILD. Pathological analysis showed the severity of vascular intimal or medial thickening in the SSc-ILD patients to be significantly higher than that in the ScAb-ILD patients. Survival curves showed that the patients with ScAb-ILD had a significantly poorer outcome than those with SSc-ILD.

Conclusion

Data from this study suggest that lung-dominant CTD with SSc-related autoantibody is a different disease entity from SSc-ILD.

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