ResearchPad - biophysics https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Insight into the protein solubility driving forces with neural attention]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13832 The solubility of proteins is a crucial biophysical aspect when it comes to understanding many human diseases and to improve the industrial processes for protein production. Due to its relevance, computational methods have been devised in order to study and possibly optimize the solubility of proteins. In this work we apply a deep-learning technique, called neural attention to predict protein solubility while “opening” the model itself to interpretability, even though Machine Learning models are usually considered black boxes. Thank to the attention mechanism, we show that i) our model implicitly learns complex patterns related to emergent, protein folding-related, aspects such as to recognize β-amyloidosis regions and that ii) the N-and C-termini are the regions with the highes signal fro solubility prediction. When it comes to enhancing the solubility of proteins, we, for the first time, propose to investigate the synergistic effects of tandem mutations instead of “single” mutations, suggesting that this could minimize the number of required proposed mutations.

]]>
<![CDATA[IP<sub>3</sub> mediated global Ca<sup>2+</sup> signals arise through two temporally and spatially distinct modes of Ca<sup>2+</sup> release]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13332 The ‘building-block’ model of inositol trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated Ca2+ liberation posits that cell-wide cytosolic Ca2+ signals arise through coordinated activation of localized Ca2+ puffs generated by stationary clusters of IP3 receptors (IP3Rs). Here, we revise this hypothesis, applying fluctuation analysis to resolve Ca2+ signals otherwise obscured during large Ca2+ elevations. We find the rising phase of global Ca2+ signals is punctuated by a flurry of puffs, which terminate before the peak by a mechanism involving partial ER Ca2+ depletion. The continuing rise in Ca2+, and persistence of global signals even when puffs are absent, reveal a second mode of spatiotemporally diffuse Ca2+ signaling. Puffs make only small, transient contributions to global Ca2+ signals, which are sustained by diffuse release of Ca2+ through a functionally distinct process. These two modes of IP3-mediated Ca2+ liberation have important implications for downstream signaling, imparting spatial and kinetic specificity to Ca2+-dependent effector functions and Ca2+ transport.

]]>
<![CDATA[A CLC-ec1 mutant reveals global conformational change and suggests a unifying mechanism for the CLC Cl<sup>–</sup>/H<sup>+</sup> transport cycle]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13331 Cells are shielded from harmful molecules and other threats by a thin, flexible layer called the membrane. However, this barrier also prevents chloride, sodium, protons and other ions from moving in or out of the cell. Channels and transporters are two types of membrane proteins that form passageways for these charged particles.

Channels let ions flow freely from one side of the membrane to the other. To do so, these proteins change their three-dimensional shape to open or close as needed. On the other hand, transporters actively pump ions across the membrane to allow the charged particles to accumulate on one side. The shape changes needed for that type of movement are different: the transporters have to open a passageway on one side of the membrane while closing it on the other side, alternating openings to one side or the other.

In general, channels and transporters are not related to each other, but one exception is a group called CLCs proteins. Present in many organisms, this family contains a mixture of channels and transporters. For example, humans have nine CLC proteins: four are channels that allow chloride ions in and out, and five are ‘exchange transporters’ that make protons and chloride ions cross the membrane in opposite directions. These proteins let one type of charged particle move freely across the membrane, which generates energy that the transporter then uses to actively pump the other ion in the direction needed by the cell. Yet, the exact three-dimensional changes required for CLC transporters and channels to perform their roles are still unknown.

To investigate this question, Chavan, Cheng et al. harnessed a technique called X-ray crystallography, which allows scientists to look at biological molecules at the level of the atom. This was paired with other methods to examine a CLC mutant that adopts the shape of a normal CLC transporter when it is loaded with a proton. The experiments revealed how various elements in the transporter move relative to each other to adopt a structure that allows protons and chloride ions to enter the protein from opposite sides of the membrane, using separate pathways. While obtained on a bacterial CLC, these results can be applied to other CLC channels and transporters (including those in humans), shedding light on how this family transports charged particles across membranes.

From bone diseases to certain types of seizures, many human conditions are associated with poorly functioning CLCs. Understanding the way these structures change their shapes to perform their roles could help to design new therapies for these health problems.

]]>
<![CDATA[Characterization of the kinetic cycle of an ABC transporter by single-molecule and cryo-EM analyses]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13327 ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are molecular pumps ubiquitous across all kingdoms of life. While their structures have been widely reported, the kinetics governing their transport cycles remain largely unexplored. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) is an ABC exporter that extrudes a variety of chemotherapeutic agents and native substrates. Previously, the structures of MRP1 were determined in an inward-facing (IF) or outward-facing (OF) conformation. Here, we used single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to track the conformational changes of bovine MRP1 (bMRP1) in real time. We also determined the structure of bMRP1 under active turnover conditions. Our results show that substrate stimulates ATP hydrolysis by accelerating the IF-to-OF transition. The rate-limiting step of the transport cycle is the dissociation of the nucleotide-binding-domain dimer, while ATP hydrolysis per se does not reset MRP1 to the resting state. The combination of structural and kinetic data illustrates how different conformations of MRP1 are temporally linked and how substrate and ATP alter protein dynamics to achieve active transport.

]]>
<![CDATA[A molecular filter for the cnidarian stinging response]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_12714 All animals detect and integrate diverse environmental signals to mediate behavior. Cnidarians, including jellyfish and sea anemones, both detect and capture prey using stinging cells called nematocytes which fire a venom-covered barb via an unknown triggering mechanism. Here, we show that nematocytes from Nematostella vectensis use a specialized voltage-gated calcium channel (nCaV) to distinguish salient sensory cues and control the explosive discharge response. Adaptations in nCaV confer unusually sensitive, voltage-dependent inactivation to inhibit responses to non-prey signals, such as mechanical water turbulence. Prey-derived chemosensory signals are synaptically transmitted to acutely relieve nCaV inactivation, enabling mechanosensitive-triggered predatory attack. These findings reveal a molecular basis for the cnidarian stinging response and highlight general principles by which single proteins integrate diverse signals to elicit discrete animal behaviors.

]]>
<![CDATA[Medusa: Software to build and analyze ensembles of genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7734 Uncertainty in the structure and parameters of networks is ubiquitous across computational biology. In constraint-based reconstruction and analysis of metabolic networks, this uncertainty is present both during the reconstruction of networks and in simulations performed with them. Here, we present Medusa, a Python package for the generation and analysis of ensembles of genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions. Medusa builds on the COBRApy package for constraint-based reconstruction and analysis by compressing a set of models into a compact ensemble object, providing functions for the generation of ensembles using experimental data, and extending constraint-based analyses to ensemble scale. We demonstrate how Medusa can be used to generate ensembles and perform ensemble simulations, and how machine learning can be used in conjunction with Medusa to guide the curation of genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions. Medusa is available under the permissive MIT license from the Python Packaging Index (https://pypi.org) and from github (https://github.com/opencobra/Medusa), and comprehensive documentation is available at https://medusa.readthedocs.io/en/latest.

]]>
<![CDATA[Understanding the computation of time using neural network models]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_8305 To maximize future rewards in this ever-changing world, animals must be able to discover the temporal structure of stimuli and then anticipate or act correctly at the right time. How do animals perceive, maintain, and use time intervals ranging from hundreds of milliseconds to multiseconds in working memory? How is temporal information processed concurrently with spatial information and decision making? Why are there strong neuronal temporal signals in tasks in which temporal information is not required? A systematic understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms is still lacking. Here, we addressed these problems using supervised training of recurrent neural network models. We revealed that neural networks perceive elapsed time through state evolution along stereotypical trajectory, maintain time intervals in working memory in the monotonic increase or decrease of the firing rates of interval-tuned neurons, and compare or produce time intervals by scaling state evolution speed. Temporal and nontemporal information is coded in subspaces orthogonal with each other, and the state trajectories with time at different nontemporal information are quasiparallel and isomorphic. Such coding geometry facilitates the decoding generalizability of temporal and nontemporal information across each other. The network structure exhibits multiple feedforward sequences that mutually excite or inhibit depending on whether their preferences of nontemporal information are similar or not. We identified four factors that facilitate strong temporal signals in nontiming tasks, including the anticipation of coming events. Our work discloses fundamental computational principles of temporal processing, and it is supported by and gives predictions to a number of experimental phenomena.

]]>
<![CDATA[Molecular dysregulation of ciliary polycystin-2 channels caused by variants in the TOP domain]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_8269 Genetic variants in PKD2 which encodes for the polycystin-2 ion channel are responsible for many clinical cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Despite our strong understanding of the genetic basis of ADPKD, we do not know how most variants impact channel function. Polycystin-2 is found in organelle membranes, including the primary cilium—an antennae-like structure on the luminal side of the collecting duct. In this study, we focus on the structural and mechanistic regulation of polycystin-2 by its TOP domain—a site with unknown function that is commonly altered by missense variants. We use direct cilia electrophysiology, cryogenic electron microscopy, and superresolution imaging to determine that variants of the TOP domain finger 1 motif destabilizes the channel structure and impairs channel opening without altering cilia localization and channel assembly. Our findings support the channelopathy classification of PKD2 variants associated with ADPKD, where polycystin-2 channel dysregulation in the primary cilia may contribute to cystogenesis.

]]>
<![CDATA[Quantitative analysis of amino acid metabolism in liver cancer links glutamate excretion to nucleotide synthesis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_8264 Many cancer cells consume glutamine at high rates; counterintuitively, they simultaneously excrete glutamate, the first intermediate in glutamine metabolism. Glutamine consumption has been linked to replenishment of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediates and synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), but the reason for glutamate excretion is unclear. Here, we dynamically profile the uptake and excretion fluxes of a liver cancer cell line (HepG2) and use genome-scale metabolic modeling for in-depth analysis. We find that up to 30% of the glutamine is metabolized in the cytosol, primarily for nucleotide synthesis, producing cytosolic glutamate. We hypothesize that excreting glutamate helps the cell to increase the nucleotide synthesis rate to sustain growth. Indeed, we show experimentally that partial inhibition of glutamate excretion reduces cell growth. Our integrative approach thus links glutamine addiction to glutamate excretion in cancer and points toward potential drug targets.

]]>
<![CDATA[Model based estimation of QT intervals in non-invasive fetal ECG signals]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7659 The end timing of T waves in fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) is important for the evaluation of ST and QT intervals which are vital markers to assess cardiac repolarization patterns. Monitoring malignant fetal arrhythmias in utero is fundamental to care in congenital heart anomalies preventing perinatal death. Currently, reliable detection of end of T waves is possible only by using fetal scalp ECG (fsECG) and fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). fMCG is expensive and less accessible and fsECG is an invasive technique available only during intrapartum period. Another safer and affordable alternative is the non-invasive fECG (nfECG) which can provide similar assessment provided by fsECG and fMECG but with less accuracy (not beat by beat). Detection of T waves using nfECG is challenging because of their low amplitudes and high noise. In this study, a novel model-based method that estimates the end of T waves in nfECG signals is proposed. The repolarization phase has been modeled as the discharging phase of a capacitor. To test the model, fECG signals were collected from 58 pregnant women (age: (34 ± 6) years old) bearing normal and abnormal fetuses with gestational age (GA) 20-41 weeks. QT and QTc intervals have been calculated to test the level of agreement between the model-based and reference values (fsECG and Doppler Ultrasound (DUS) signals) in normal subjects. The results of the test showed high agreement between model-based and reference values (difference < 5%), which implies that the proposed model could be an alternative method to detect the end of T waves in nfECG signals.

]]>
<![CDATA[Delineating an extracellular redox-sensitive module in T-type Ca<sup>2+</sup> channels]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7283 T-type (Cav3) Ca2+ channels are important regulators of excitability and rhythmic activity of excitable cells. Among other voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, Cav3 channels are uniquely sensitive to oxidation and zinc. Using recombinant protein expression in HEK293 cells, patch clamp electrophysiology, site-directed mutagenesis, and homology modeling, we report here that modulation of Cav3.2 by redox agents and zinc is mediated by a unique extracellular module containing a high-affinity metal-binding site formed by the extracellular IS1–IS2 and IS3–IS4 loops of domain I and a cluster of extracellular cysteines in the IS1–IS2 loop. Patch clamp recording of recombinant Cav3.2 currents revealed that two cysteine-modifying agents, sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl) methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) and N-ethylmaleimide, as well as a reactive oxygen species–producing neuropeptide, substance P (SP), inhibit Cav3.2 current to similar degrees and that this inhibition is reversed by a reducing agent and a zinc chelator. Pre-application of MTSES prevented further SP-mediated current inhibition. Substitution of the zinc-binding residue His191 in Cav3.2 reduced the channel's sensitivity to MTSES, and introduction of the corresponding histidine into Cav3.1 sensitized it to MTSES. Removal of extracellular cysteines from the IS1–IS2 loop of Cav3.2 reduced its sensitivity to MTSES and SP. We hypothesize that oxidative modification of IS1–IS2 loop cysteines induces allosteric changes in the zinc-binding site of Cav3.2 so that it becomes sensitive to ambient zinc.

]]>
<![CDATA[Heterogeneity of proteome dynamics between connective tissue phases of adult tendon]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7267 Muscles are anchored to bones through specialized tissues called tendons. Made of bundles of fibers (or fascicles) linked together by an ‘interfascicular’ matrix, healthy tendons are required for organisms to move properly. Yet, these structures are constantly exposed to damage: the interfascicular matrix, in particular, is highly susceptible to injury as it allows the fascicles to slide on each other.

One way to avoid damage could be for the body to continually replace proteins in tendons before they become too impaired. However, the way proteins are renewed in these structures is currently not well understood – indeed, it has long been assumed that almost no protein turnover occurs in tendons. In particular, it is unknown whether proteins in the interfascicular matrix have a higher turn over than those in the fascicles.

To investigate, Choi, Simpson et al. fed rats on water carrying a molecular label that becomes integrated into new proteins. Analysis of individual proteins from the rats’ tendons showed great variation in protein turnover, with some replaced every few days and others only over several years. This suggests that protein turnover is actually an important part of tendon health. In particular, the results show that turnover is higher in the interfascicular matrix, where damage is expected to be more likely.

Protein turnover also plays a part in conditions such as cancer, heart disease and kidney disease. Using approaches like the one developed by Choi, Simpson et al. could help to understand how individual proteins are renewed in a range of diseases, and how to design new treatments.

]]>
<![CDATA[The microcircuits of striatum in silico]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nb554bc96-b428-4c19-ba40-2736d903683b The basal ganglia play an important role in decision making and selection of action primarily based on input from cortex, thalamus, and the dopamine system. Their main input structure, striatum, is central to this process. It consists of two types of projection neurons, together representing 95% of the neurons, and 5% of interneurons, among which are the cholinergic, fast-spiking, and low threshold-spiking subtypes. The membrane properties, soma–dendritic shape, and intrastriatal and extrastriatal synaptic interactions of these neurons are quite well described in the mouse, and therefore they can be simulated in sufficient detail to capture their intrinsic properties, as well as the connectivity. We focus on simulation at the striatal cellular/microcircuit level, in which the molecular/subcellular and systems levels meet. We present a nearly full-scale model of the mouse striatum using available data on synaptic connectivity, cellular morphology, and electrophysiological properties to create a microcircuit mimicking the real network. A striatal volume is populated with reconstructed neuronal morphologies with appropriate cell densities, and then we connect neurons together based on appositions between neurites as possible synapses and constrain them further with available connectivity data. Moreover, we simulate a subset of the striatum involving 10,000 neurons, with input from cortex, thalamus, and the dopamine system, as a proof of principle. Simulation at this biological scale should serve as an invaluable tool to understand the mode of operation of this complex structure. This platform will be updated with new data and expanded to simulate the entire striatum.

]]>
<![CDATA[Single-molecule observation of ATP-independent SSB displacement by RecO in <i>Deinococcus radiodurans</i>]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N75dd0523-a172-49b7-a20f-e040e1226ee1 Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) survives in the presence of hundreds of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks by efficiently repairing such breaks. RecO, a protein that is essential for the extreme radioresistance of DR, is one of the major recombination mediator proteins in the RecA-loading process in the RecFOR pathway. However, how RecO participates in the RecA-loading process is still unclear. In this work, we investigated the function of drRecO using single-molecule techniques. We found that drRecO competes with the ssDNA-binding protein (drSSB) for binding to the freely exposed ssDNA, and efficiently displaces drSSB from ssDNA without consuming ATP. drRecO replaces drSSB and dissociates it completely from ssDNA even though drSSB binds to ssDNA approximately 300 times more strongly than drRecO does. We suggest that drRecO facilitates the loading of RecA onto drSSB-coated ssDNA by utilizing a small drSSB-free space on ssDNA that is generated by the fast diffusion of drSSB on ssDNA.

]]>
<![CDATA[Limited dishevelled/Axin oligomerization determines efficiency of Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N89b0a066-5932-4aa3-9c28-7c04aeecc210 Stem cells can give rise to many types of specialized cells through a process called differentiation, which is partly regulated by changes in the levels of a protein known as β-catenin. On one hand, a ‘destruction complex’ can keep β-catenin levels low; this complex includes a protein called Axin and an enzyme known as GSK-3, which can tag β-catenin for degradation. On the other hand, when β-catenin levels need to increase, another protein called Dishevelled is activated. By binding to Axin, Dishevelled can bring the destruction complex in contact with other proteins, which leads to the deactivation of GSK-3.

Dishevelled and Axin interact via a region that is similar in the two proteins, called DIX in Dishevelled and DAX in Axin. Studies of DIX and DAX have shown that both regions can form polymers – that is, a high number of similar units can bind together to form larger structures. However, these experiments were at higher concentrations than would be found in the cell. It was thought that, when combined, DIX and DAX might form these long chains together, preventing Axin from carrying out its role in destroying β-catenin. Kan et al. set out to better understand this process by studying how DIX and DAX behave separately, and how they interact.

The proteins were examined using a technique called cryo-electron microscopy, which allows scientists to dissect the structure of large proteins. When there was a high concentration of DIX in the sample, the molecules attached to one another to form long double-stranded helices. Similarly, DAX also formed helices, but these were shorter and only single-stranded. When the two proteins were combined, DAX bound only to the ends of short DIX chains, so that there are not more than four DAX chains attached to each DIX double helix.

To see if this behaviour happens naturally, Kan et al. attached fluorescent tags to Dishevelled proteins and followed them in living cells: this showed that Dishevelled forms smaller chains with fewer than ten molecules. Together these results highlight how Dishevelled binds to Axin to deactivate GSK-3, to prevent the enzyme from promoting β-catenin destruction.

Mutations in the genes that encode β-catenin or its regulators are associated with cancer. Ultimately, a better understanding of how β-catenin is regulated could help to identify new opportunities for drug development.

]]>
<![CDATA[Cryo-EM structure of the potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC4 in lipid nanodiscs]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N58103102-565b-4494-8b69-a2dcfc1a57fa Cation-chloride-cotransporters (CCCs) catalyze transport of Cl- with K+ and/or Na+across cellular membranes. CCCs play roles in cellular volume regulation, neural development and function, audition, regulation of blood pressure, and renal function. CCCs are targets of clinically important drugs including loop diuretics and their disruption has been implicated in pathophysiology including epilepsy, hearing loss, and the genetic disorders Andermann, Gitelman, and Bartter syndromes. Here we present the structure of a CCC, the Mus musculus K+-Cl- cotransporter (KCC) KCC4, in lipid nanodiscs determined by cryo-EM. The structure, captured in an inside-open conformation, reveals the architecture of KCCs including an extracellular domain poised to regulate transport activity through an outer gate. We identify binding sites for substrate K+ and Cl- ions, demonstrate the importance of key coordinating residues for transporter activity, and provide a structural explanation for varied substrate specificity and ion transport ratio among CCCs. These results provide mechanistic insight into the function and regulation of a physiologically important transporter family.

]]>
<![CDATA[A single power stroke by ATP binding drives substrate translocation in a heterodimeric ABC transporter]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N31301349-16ac-43e0-9228-476ce24b03ef ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute the largest family of primary active transporters, responsible for many physiological processes and human maladies. However, the mechanism how chemical energy of ATP facilitates translocation of chemically diverse compounds across membranes is poorly understood. Here, we advance the quantitative mechanistic understanding of the heterodimeric ABC transporter TmrAB, a functional homolog of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) by single-turnover analyses at single-liposome resolution. We reveal that a single conformational switch by ATP binding drives unidirectional substrate translocation. After this power stroke, ATP hydrolysis and phosphate release launch the return to the resting state, which facilitates nucleotide exchange and a new round of substrate binding and translocation. In contrast to hitherto existing steady-state assays, our single-turnover approach uncovers the power stroke in substrate translocation and the tight chemomechanical coupling in these molecular machines.

]]>
<![CDATA[Top-down machine learning approach for high-throughput single-molecule analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N957aad02-2c00-4587-a7f5-2b73aea07b8d During a chemical or biological process, a molecule may transition through a series of states, many of which are rare or short-lived. Advances in technology have made it easier to detect these states by gathering large amounts of data on individual molecules. However, the increasing size of these datasets has put a strain on the algorithms and software used to identify different molecular states.

Now, White et al. have developed a new algorithm called DISC which overcomes this technical limitation. Unlike most other algorithms, DISC requires minimal input from the user and uses a new method to group the data into categories that represent distinct molecular states. Although this new approach produces a similar end-result, it reaches this conclusion much faster than more commonly used algorithms.

To test the effectiveness of the algorithm, White et al. studied how individual molecules of a chemical known as cAMP bind to parts of proteins called cyclic nucleotide binding domains (or CNDBs for short). A fluorescent tag was attached to single molecules of cAMP and data were collected on the behavior of each molecule. Previous evidence suggested that when four CNDBs join together to form a so-called tetramer complex, this affects the binding of cAMP. Using the DISC system, White et al. showed that individual cAMP molecules interact with all four domains in a similar way, suggesting that the binding of cAMP is not impacted by the formation of a tetramer complex.

Analyzing this data took DISC less than 20 minutes compared to existing algorithms which took anywhere between four hours and two weeks to complete. The enhanced speed of the DISC algorithm could make it easier to analyze much larger datasets from other techniques in addition to fluorescence. This means that a greater number of states can be sampled, providing a deeper insight into the inner workings of biological and chemical processes.

]]>
<![CDATA[Cavitation in soft matter]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nd0a93384-098b-4855-abf9-29f74edc2c6d Cavitation is the sudden, unstable expansion of a void or bubble within a liquid or solid subjected to a negative hydrostatic stress. Cavitation rheology is a field emerging from the development of a suite of materials characterization, damage quantification, and therapeutic techniques that exploit the physical principles of cavitation. Cavitation rheology is inherently complex and broad in scope with wide-ranging applications in the biology, chemistry, materials, and mechanics communities. This perspective aims to drive collaboration among these communities and guide discussion by defining a common core of high-priority goals while highlighting emerging opportunities in the field of cavitation rheology. A brief overview of the mechanics and dynamics of cavitation in soft matter is presented. This overview is followed by a discussion of the overarching goals of cavitation rheology and an overview of common experimental techniques. The larger unmet needs and challenges of cavitation in soft matter are then presented alongside specific opportunities for researchers from different disciplines to contribute to the field.

]]>
<![CDATA[Redefining the heterogeneity of peripheral nerve cells in health and autoimmunity]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nf11306cd-b1fa-4dea-b8f8-c518a6d7fffd Peripheral nerves contain axons and their enwrapping glia cells named Schwann cells (SCs) that are either myelinating (mySCs) or nonmyelinating (nmSCs). Our understanding of other cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) remains limited. Here, we provide an unbiased single cell transcriptomic characterization of the nondiseased rodent PNS. We identified and independently confirmed markers of previously underappreciated nmSCs and nerve-associated fibroblasts. We also found and characterized two distinct populations of nerve-resident homeostatic myeloid cells that transcriptionally differed from central nervous system microglia. In a model of chronic autoimmune neuritis, homeostatic myeloid cells were outnumbered by infiltrating lymphocytes which modulated the local cell–cell interactome and induced a specific transcriptional response in glia cells. This response was partially shared between the peripheral and central nervous system glia, indicating common immunological features across different parts of the nervous system. Our study thus identifies subtypes and cell-type markers of PNS cells and a partially conserved autoimmunity module induced in glia cells.

]]>