ResearchPad - body-mass-index https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Epidemiological characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea in a hospital-based historical cohort in Lebanon]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14697 The objective of our study was to characterize and analyze the associations between OSA (obstructive sleep apnea) and other clinical variables in adult patients referred for sleep evaluation by polysomnography at a referral center in Beirut, Lebanon, in terms of sociodemographic features, symptoms presentation and comorbidities, and evaluate the burden of comorbidities associated with this disease. All individuals with suspected Sleep Apnea referred (January 2010-September 2017) for a one-night polysomnography were included. Demographics, self-reported symptoms and comorbidities were documented. The relationship between OSA severity and the presence of symptoms and comorbidities were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression. Overall, 663 subjects were assessed. Of these, 57.3% were referred from chest physicians, and sleep test results were abnormal in 589 subjects (88.8%) of whom 526 patients (89.3%) fulfilled diagnostic criteria for OSA; 76.3% were men and women were on average older. OSA was severe in 43.2% and more severe in men. Almost all patients were symptomatic with ~2–4 symptoms per patient and women presented with symptoms that are more atypical. Comorbidities were significantly higher in women. In the multivariate analysis, age, male sex, obesity, symptoms of snoring, excessive daytime somnolence and witnessed apneas were associated with OSA severity. Only age and obesity were associated with self-reported diagnosis of hypertension and diabetes. This is the first study in Lebanon to explore the characteristics of patients with polysomnography-diagnosed OSA. High prevalence of severe OSA and low referral rates in the medical community support promoting awareness for an earlier diagnosis and more personalized approach in this country.

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<![CDATA[Lifestyle, sick leave and work ability among Norwegian employees with asthma—A population-based cross-sectional survey conducted in Telemark County, Norway]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Ndae955f4-245c-442b-a4a6-579d96a7b9a3

Objective

To investigate whether physician-diagnosed asthma modifies the associations between multiple lifestyle factors, sick leave and work ability in a general working population.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted in Telemark County, Norway, in 2013. A sample of 16 099 respondents completed a self-administered questionnaire. We obtained complete data on lifestyle, work ability and sick leave for 10 355 employed persons aged 18–50 years. We modelled sick leave and work ability using multiple logistic regression, and introduced interaction terms to investigate whether associations with lifestyle factors were modified by asthma status.

Results

Several lifestyle risk factors and a multiple lifestyle risk index were associated with sick leave and reduced work ability score among persons both with and without physician-diagnosed asthma. A stronger association between lifestyle and sick leave among persons with asthma was confirmed by including interaction terms in the analysis: moderate lifestyle risk score * asthma OR = 1.4 (95% CI 1.02–2.1); high lifestyle risk score * asthma OR = 1.6 (95% CI 1.1–2.3); very high lifestyle risk score * asthma OR = 1.6 (95% CI 0.97–2.7); obesity * asthma OR = 1.5 (95% CI 1.02–2.1); past smoking * asthma OR = 1.4 (95% CI 1.01–1.9); and current smoking * asthma OR = 1.4 (95% CI 1.03–2.0).

There was no significant difference in the association between lifestyle and work ability score among respondents with and without asthma.

Conclusions

In the present study, we found that physician-diagnosed asthma modified the association between lifestyle risk factors and sick leave. Asthma status did not significantly modify these associations with reduced work ability score. The results indicate that lifestyle changes could be of particular importance for employees with asthma.

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<![CDATA[The relationship between weight indices and injuries and mortalities caused by the motor vehicle accidents: a systematic review and meta-analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nb7be7321-f465-4fbd-b89b-97489c1fd713

Abstract:

Background:

The relationship between weight indices and injuries and mortality in motor vehicle accidents is unknown. Systematic review studies addressing the collection and analysis of the relationship in investigations are very limited. The purpose of this systematic review is to deter-mine the relationship between BMI, obesity and overweight with mortality and injuries and their severity and vulnerable organs after the motor vehicle accident.

Methods:

The databases (MEDLINE/PUBMED, EMBASE, Web of Science, etc) were searched for relevant abstracts using certain keywords. Of all the articles, similar ones were removed considering different filters. The collected data were entered into the STATA SE v 13.1. The heterogeneity of the data was analyzed using i2 statistics. In addition, the estimates of the study were done based on the age group (children and adults) and the impact of obesity on different regions of the body.

Results:

A direct relationship was observed between the overall BMI and the degrees of injuries (CI=0.503-1.139), and mortality due to motor vehicle accident (CI=1.267-1.471). A positive relationship was found between obesity and AIS+2 (CI=0.653-1.426), and AIS+3 (CI=1.184-1.741), and ISS (CI=1.086-1.589). Also, a negative relationship between overweight and inju-ries rates, and a direct relationship between overweight and mortality (CI=0.979-1.167), and injuries with index of AIS+2 (CI=1.178-0.768) and AIS+3 (CI=0.48-2.186) were found.

Conclusions:

The prediction of injury, mortality and severity of injuries in the motor vehicle accident by the variable of obesity and overweight determines the need to design prevention programs for this vulnerable group at all levels.

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<![CDATA[Comparison of triglyceride glucose index, and related parameters to predict insulin resistance in Korean adults: An analysis of the 2007-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c990272d5eed0c484b97e62

The triglyceride glucose (TyG) index, a product of triglyceride and fasting glucose, is a reliable marker for insulin resistance (IR). Obesity is also known to be closely related with IR. Recently, the efficiency of TyG-related markers that combine obesity markers with TyG index has been studied; however, earlier studies were limited in number and the results were inconsistent. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the efficiency of several combinations of TyG index and obesity indices, namely, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), in reflecting IR. Data were obtained from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007–2010. A total of 11,149 subjects (4,777 men and 6,372 women) were included. IR was defined as the homeostasis model assessment for IR (HOMA-IR) of above the 75th percentile for each gender. Logistic regression analysis was performed after adjusting for confounding factors, to compare and identify the associations of the 4 parameters (TyG index, TyG-BMI, TyG-WC, and TyG-WHtR) with IR. For each parameter, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of quartiles 2–4 were calculated and compared with quartile 1 as a reference. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was conducted to evaluate the ability of each parameter to predict IR. The adjusted ORs of quartile 4 in comparison with quartile 1 (95% CIs) for IR were 7.60 (6.52–8.87) for TyG index, 12.82 (10.89–15.10) for TyG-BMI, 16.29 (13.70–19.38) for TyG-WC, and 14.86 (12.53–17.62) for TyG-WHtR. The areas under the ROC curve for each parameter were 0.690 for TyG index, 0.748 for TyG-BMI, 0.731 for TyG-WC, and 0.733 for TyG-WHtR. In conclusion, TyG-BMI was found to be superior to other parameters for IR prediction. We propose TyG-BMI as an alternative marker for assessing IR in clinical settings.

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<![CDATA[Plasma sphingomyelins increase in pre-diabetic Korean men with abdominal obesity]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8823f3d5eed0c4846393cb

Abdominal or visceral obesity is a well-known risk factor for metabolic diseases. However, whether abdominal obesity significantly affects plasma lipid profile during the development of type 2 diabetes has not been fully elucidated. We investigated the differences in plasma lipid concentrations in 63 participants categorized into six groups (middle-aged Korean men); Normal, Pre-diabetes (pre-DM), and Diabetes mellitus (DM) with or without abdominal obesity (AO or lean). The lipidomic profiles were determined by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Sphingomyelin (SM) levels in plasma were significantly higher in the pre-DM with AO than in pre-DM with lean (p = 0.021). SM concentrations correlated positively with waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) (r = 0.256, p = 0.044), cholesteryl ester (CE) (r = 0.483, p < 0.0001), ceramide (r = 0.489, p < 0.0001) and plasmanyl phosphatidylcholine (PC) (r = 0.446, p < 0.0001). The present study found that pre-diabetic patients with AO were characterized by increased plasma concentrations of SM. Plasma SM levels in individuals with AO may be an early prognostic biomarker to better predict the progression toward type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

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<![CDATA[In-silico pre-clinical trials are made possible by a new simple and comprehensive lumbar belt mechanical model based on the Law of Laplace including support deformation and adhesion effects]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c89779ad5eed0c4847d3130

Lower back pain is a major public health problem. Despite claims that lumbar belts change spinal posture due to applied pressure on the trunk, no mechanical model has yet been published to prove this treatment. This paper describes a first model for belt design, based on the one hand on the mechanical properties of the fabrics and the belt geometry, and on the other hand on the trunk geometrical and mechanical description. The model provides the estimation of the pressure applied to the trunk, and a unique indicator of the belt mechanical efficiency is proposed: pressure is integrated into a bending moment characterizing the belt delordosing action on the spine. A first in-silico clinical study of belt efficiency for 15 patients with 2 different belts was conducted. Results are very dependent on the body shape: in the case of high BMI patients, the belt effect is significantly decreased, and can be even inverted, increasing the lordosis. The belt stiffness proportionally increases the pressure applied to the trunk, but the influence of the design itself on the bending moment is clearly outlined. Moreover, the belt/trunk interaction, modeled as sticking contact and the specific way patients lock their belts, dramatically modifies the belt action. Finally, even if further developments and tests are still necessary, the model presented in this paper seems suitable for in-silico pre-clinical trials on real body shapes at a design stage.

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<![CDATA[Brief communication: β-cell function influences dopamine receptor availability]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8c1952d5eed0c484b4d3f2

We aim to identify physiologic regulators of dopamine (DA) signaling in obesity but previously did not find a compelling relationship with insulin sensitivity measured by oral-minimal model (OMM) and DA subtype 2 and 3 receptor (D2/3R) binding potential (BPND). Reduced disposition index (DI), a β-cell function metric that can also be calculated by OMM, was shown to predict a negative reward behavior that occurs in states of lower endogenous DA. We hypothesized that reduced DI would occur with higher D2/3R BPND, reflecting lower endogenous DA. Participants completed PET scanning, with a displaceable radioligand to measure D2/3R BPND, and a 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test to measure DI by OMM. We studied 26 age-similar females without (n = 8) and with obesity (n = 18) (22 vs 39 kg/m2). Reduced DI predicted increased striatal D2/3R BPND independent of BMI. By accounting for β-cell function, we were able to determine that the state of insulin and glucose metabolism is pertinent to striatal D2/3R BPND in obesity.

Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT00802204

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<![CDATA[Adult body weight trends in 27 urban populations of Brazil from 2006 to 2016: A population-based study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c897752d5eed0c4847d29e8

Objective

We aimed to estimate trends in population-level adult body weight indicators in the 26 state capitals and the Federal District of Brazil.

Methods

Self-reported weight and height data of 572,437 adults were used to estimate the mean body mass index (BMI), and the prevalence of BMI categories ranging from underweight to morbid obesity, in Brazil’s state capitals and Federal District, from 2006 to 2016, by sex. All estimates were standardized by age.

Results

From 2006 to 2016, the main findings showed that: (i) the overall mean BMI increased from 25.4 kg/m2 to 26.3 kg/m2 in men, and from 24.5 kg/m2 to 25.8 kg/m2 in women; (ii) the overall prevalence of overweight increased from 48.1% to 57.5% in men, and from 37.8% to 48.2% in women; (iii) the overall prevalence of obesity increased from 11.7% to 18.1% in men, and from 12.1% to 18.8% in women; (iv) in general, the largest increases in overweight and obesity prevalence were found in state capitals located in the north, northeast, and central-west regions of Brazil; (v) the prevalence of severe obesity surpassed the prevalence of underweight in 22 and 9 state capitals among men and women, respectively; and (vi) the mean BMI trend was stable only in Vitória state capital in men.

Conclusions

The policies for preventing and treating obesity in Brazil over the past years were not able to halt the increase in obesity prevalence either in the state capitals or the Federal District. Thus, a revision of policies is warranted. Furthermore, although policies are necessary in all state capitals, our results suggest that policies are especially necessary in the north, northeast, and central-west regions’ state capitals, where, in general, the largest increases in overweight and obesity prevalence were experienced.

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<![CDATA[Previously-initiated hemodialysis as prognostic factor for in-hospital mortality in pneumonia patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease: Retrospective database study of Japanese hospitals]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c818e8bd5eed0c484cc24db

Background

Some clinicians keep patients in stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) without hemodialysis for a while. This study investigated whether previously-initiated hemodialysis in stage 5 CKD patients may become a prognostic factor for in-hospital mortality due to pneumonia.

Methods

Patient data were obtained from the multi-institutional diagnosis procedure combination database between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2016. The patients had records of pneumonia as both trigger and major diagnoses and records of end stage renal disease (ESRD) or stage 5 CKD as a comorbidity or other diagnoses on admission and aged 18 years or older. The following factors were adjusted: age, sex, body mass index, Barthel index, orientation disturbance, arterial oxygen saturation, systolic blood pressure, C-reactive protein level or the extent of consolidation on chest radiography, ambulance use, hospitalization within 90 days, and comorbidities upon admission. The primary outcome measure was all-cause in-hospital mortality obtained via multivariable logistic regression analysis using four Models. Model 1 involved complete case analysis with overlapping; one hospitalization per patient was counted as one. Model 2 involved a complete case analysis without overlapping; only the first hospitalization per patient was counted. Model 3 involved multilevel analysis clustered by hospital codes. Model 4 was created after multiple imputation for lacking adjusted factors.

Results

A total of 907 hospitals and 7,726 patients were identified. Hemodialysis was significantly associated with lower in-hospital mortality in all models (odds ratio [OR] = 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.54–0.87 in Model 1; OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55–0.91 in Model 2; OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.52–0.86 in Model 3; and OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.54–0.87 in Model 4).

Conclusion

Previously-initiated hemodialysis may be an independent prognostic factor for in-hospital mortality in pneumonia patients with end-stage renal disease. This should be borne in mind when considering the time of initiation of dialysis.

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<![CDATA[Associations of anxiety with discomfort and tolerance in Chinese patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c75ac6fd5eed0c484d08793

Objectives

To evaluate the associations of pre-endoscopy anxiety with discomfort and tolerance in patients undergoing unsedated esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD).

Methods

This is a hospital-based cohort study of 348 patients undergoing routine, non-advanced EGD without sedation. The primary outcomes were discomfort and tolerance. The anxiety before endoscopy was evaluated with a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS). The associations of pre-endoscopy anxiety with the outcomes were evaluated with logistic regression adjusting for potential confounders like age, sex, and body mass index.

Results

Seventy patients reported severe discomfort and 56 patients reported poor tolerance after endoscopy. The risk of severe discomfort increased with pre-endoscopy anxiety and reached a platform around 7–10 points. Compared with the participants with low pre-endoscopy anxiety, those with moderate (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17 to 6.22) and high level of anxiety (adjusted OR 6.87, 95% CI 2.16 to 21.79) were associated with a gradual increase in the risk of severe discomfort (P-trend < 0.001). The association between pre-endoscopy anxiety and tolerance was linear, with an adjusted OR of 1.67(95% CI 1.33 to 2.08) for a 1-score increase in pre-endoscopy anxiety VAS. The associations were not modified by age, sex, pharyngitis, duration of endoscopy, and diameter of the endoscope.

Conclusions

Pre-endoscopy anxiety was an independent predictor of severe discomfort and poor tolerance in Chinese patients undergoing unsedated EGD. Our findings suggested the importance of the management of anxiety to reduce adverse endoscopic experience and taking high level of anxiety as an indication for sedation.

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<![CDATA[Molecular dynamic (MD) studies on Gln233Arg (rs1137101) polymorphism of leptin receptor gene and associated variations in the anthropometric and metabolic profiles of Saudi women]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f1542d5eed0c48467afac

The Gln233Arg (A>G; rs1137101) polymorphism of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR) has been investigated extensively and is reported to be associated with different metabolic states. In this investigation, we aimed to study the frequency of Gln233Arg genotypes and alleles in a group of Saudi women stratified by their body mass index (BMI), to correlate the LEPR genotypes with variations in anthropometric, lipid and hormonal parameters and to investigate conformational and structural variations in the mutant LEPR using molecular dynamic (MD) investigations. The study group included 122 Saudi women (normal weight = 60; obese = 62) attending the clinics for a routine checkup. Anthropometric data: height, weight, waist and hip circumference were recorded and fasting serum sample was used to estimate glucose, lipids, ghrelin, leptin and insulin. BMI, W/H ratio, and HOMA-IR values were calculated. Whole blood sample was used to extract DNA; exon 6 of the LEPR gene was amplified by PCR and sequencing was conducted on an ABI 3100 Avant Genetic Analyser. Molecular Dynamic Simulation studies were carried out using different softwares. The results showed the presence of all three genotypes of Gln233Arg in Saudi women, but the frequencies were significantly different when compared to reports from some populations. No differences were seen in the genotype and allele frequencies between the normal weight and obese women. Stratification by the genotypes showed significantly higher BMI, waist and hip circumference, leptin, insulin, fasting glucose and HOMA-IR and lower ghrelin levels in obese women carrying the GG genotype. Even in the normal weight group, individuals with GG genotype had higher BMI, waist and hip circumference and significantly lower ghrelin levels. The MD studies showed a significant effect of the Gln/Arg substitution on the conformation, flexibility, root-mean-square fluctuation (RMSF), radius of gyration (Rg) values, solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) and number of inter- and intra-molecular H-bonds. The results suggest that the structural changes brought about by the mutation, influence the signaling pathways by some unknown mechanism, which may be contributing to the abnormalities seen in the individuals carrying the G allele of rs1137101.

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<![CDATA[Searching for the causal effects of body mass index in over 300 000 participants in UK Biobank, using Mendelian randomization]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5df305d5eed0c484580b50

Mendelian randomization (MR) has been used to estimate the causal effect of body mass index (BMI) on particular traits thought to be affected by BMI. However, BMI may also be a modifiable, causal risk factor for outcomes where there is no prior reason to suggest that a causal effect exists. We performed a MR phenome-wide association study (MR-pheWAS) to search for the causal effects of BMI in UK Biobank (n = 334 968), using the PHESANT open-source phenome scan tool. A subset of identified associations were followed up with a formal two-stage instrumental variable analysis in UK Biobank, to estimate the causal effect of BMI on these phenotypes. Of the 22 922 tests performed, our MR-pheWAS identified 587 associations below a stringent P value threshold corresponding to a 5% estimated false discovery rate. These included many previously identified causal effects, for instance, an adverse effect of higher BMI on risk of diabetes and hypertension. We also identified several novel effects, including protective effects of higher BMI on a set of psychosocial traits, identified initially in our preliminary MR-pheWAS in circa 115,000 UK Biobank participants and replicated in a different subset of circa 223,000 UK Biobank participants. Our comprehensive MR-pheWAS identified potential causal effects of BMI on a large and diverse set of phenotypes. This included both previously identified causal effects, and novel effects such as a protective effect of higher BMI on feelings of nervousness.

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<![CDATA[Population-based dementia prediction model using Korean public health examination data: A cohort study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6c7598d5eed0c4843cfefb

The early identification and prevention of dementia is important for reducing its worldwide burden and increasing individuals’ quality of life. Although several dementia prediction models have been developed, there remains a need for a practical and precise model targeted to middle-aged and Asian populations. Here, we used national Korean health examination data from adults (331,126 individuals, 40–69 years of age, mean age: 52 years) from 2002–2003 to predict the incidence of dementia after 10 years. We divided the dataset into two cohorts to develop and validate of our prediction model. Cox proportional hazards models were used to construct dementia prediction models for the total group and sex-specific subgroups. Receiver operating characteristics curves, C-statistics, calibration plots, and cumulative hazards were used to validate model performance. Discriminative accuracy as measured by C-statistics was 0.81 in the total group (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.81 to 0.82), 0.81 in the male subgroup (CI = 0.80 to 0.82), and 0.81 in the female subgroup (CI = 0.80 to 0.82). Significant risk factors for dementia in the total group were age; female sex; underweight; current hypertension; comorbid psychiatric or neurological disorder; past medical history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, or hypertension; current smoking; and no exercise. All identified risk factors were statistically significant in the sex-specific subgroups except for low body weight and current hypertension in the female subgroup. These results suggest that public health examination data can be effectively used to predict dementia and facilitate the early identification of dementia within a middle-aged Asian population.

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<![CDATA[The associations of fat tissue and muscle mass indices with all-cause mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dc9bbd5eed0c48452a0c8

Protein-energy wasting, which involves loss of fat and muscle mass, is prevalent and is associated with mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We investigated the associations of fat tissue and muscle mass indices with all-cause mortality in HD patients. The study included 162 patients undergoing HD. The fat tissue index (FTI) and skeletal muscle mass index (SMI), which represent respective tissue masses normalized to height squared, were measured by bioimpedance analysis after dialysis. Patients were divided into the following four groups according to the medians of FTI and SMI values: group 1 (G1), lower FTI and lower SMI; G2, higher FTI and lower SMI; G3, lower FTI and higher SMI; and G4, higher FTI and higher SMI. The associations of the FTI, SMI, and body mass index (BMI) with all-cause mortality were evaluated. During a median follow-up of 2.5 years, 29 patients died. The 5-year survival rates were 48.6%, 76.1%, 95.7%, and 87.4% in the G1, G2, G3, and G4 groups, respectively (P = 0.0002). The adjusted hazard ratio values were 0.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10–0.95, P = 0.040) for G2 vs. G1, 0.13 (95%CI 0.01–0.69, P = 0.013) for G3 vs. G1, and 0.25 (95%CI 0.07–0.72, P = 0.0092) for G4 vs. G1, respectively. With regard to model discrimination, on adding both FTI and SMI to a model with established risk factors, the C-index increased significantly when compared with the value for a model with BMI (0.763 vs. 0.740, P = 0.016). Higher FTI and/or higher SMI values were independently associated with reduced risks of all-cause mortality in HD patients. Moreover, the combination of the FTI and SMI may more accurately predict all-cause mortality when compared with BMI. Therefore, these body composition indicators should be evaluated simultaneously in this population.

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<![CDATA[Adverse effects of paternal obesity on the motile spermatozoa quality]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6b2696d5eed0c484289d07

Growing evidence suggests that paternal obesity may decrease male fertility potential. During infertility treatment with intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), a morphologically normal motile spermatozoon is injected into a mature egg, when possible. However, sperm motility and morphology per se do not reflect the sperm molecular composition. In this study, we aimed to assess the quality of motile spermatozoa in the context of obesity by analysing their conventional and molecular characteristics as well as their ability to promote early embryonic development. A prospective study was conducted on 128 infertile men divided into three groups: 40 lean, 42 overweight, and 46 obese men. Conventional sperm parameters (concentration, motility and morphology) and sperm molecular status (chromatin composition and integrity, 5-methycytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxycytosine (5-hmC) contents and oxidative stress level) were analysed on raw semen and/or on motile spermatozoa selected by density gradient or swim-up techniques. Morphokinetic analysis of the embryos derived from ICSI was performed using the Embryoviewer software. Our results showed that the motile sperm-enriched fraction from obese men exhibited higher levels of retained histones (p<0.001), elevated percentage of altered chromatin integrity (p<0.001), and decreased contents of 5-hmC (p<0.001), and 5-mC (p<0.05) levels as compared to that from lean men. Importantly, there were no statistically significant correlations between these molecular parameters and the percentages of morphologically normal motile spermatozoa. Regarding embryo morphokinetics, the CC1 (p<0.05) and CC3 (p<0.05) embryonic cell cycles were significantly delayed in the cleavage embryos of the obese group as compared to the embryos of the lean group. Our data is of particular interest because, besides demonstrating the negative impacts of obesity on motile spermatozoa molecular composition, it also highlights the possible risk of disturbing early embryonic cell cycles kinetics in the context of paternal obesity.

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<![CDATA[Maternal body mass index, gestational weight gain, and the risk of overweight and obesity across childhood: An individual participant data meta-analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6b263bd5eed0c48428960d

Background

Maternal obesity and excessive gestational weight gain may have persistent effects on offspring fat development. However, it remains unclear whether these effects differ by severity of obesity, and whether these effects are restricted to the extremes of maternal body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain. We aimed to assess the separate and combined associations of maternal BMI and gestational weight gain with the risk of overweight/obesity throughout childhood, and their population impact.

Methods and findings

We conducted an individual participant data meta-analysis of data from 162,129 mothers and their children from 37 pregnancy and birth cohort studies from Europe, North America, and Australia. We assessed the individual and combined associations of maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain, both in clinical categories and across their full ranges, with the risks of overweight/obesity in early (2.0–5.0 years), mid (5.0–10.0 years) and late childhood (10.0–18.0 years), using multilevel binary logistic regression models with a random intercept at cohort level adjusted for maternal sociodemographic and lifestyle-related characteristics. We observed that higher maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain both in clinical categories and across their full ranges were associated with higher risks of childhood overweight/obesity, with the strongest effects in late childhood (odds ratios [ORs] for overweight/obesity in early, mid, and late childhood, respectively: OR 1.66 [95% CI: 1.56, 1.78], OR 1.91 [95% CI: 1.85, 1.98], and OR 2.28 [95% CI: 2.08, 2.50] for maternal overweight; OR 2.43 [95% CI: 2.24, 2.64], OR 3.12 [95% CI: 2.98, 3.27], and OR 4.47 [95% CI: 3.99, 5.23] for maternal obesity; and OR 1.39 [95% CI: 1.30, 1.49], OR 1.55 [95% CI: 1.49, 1.60], and OR 1.72 [95% CI: 1.56, 1.91] for excessive gestational weight gain). The proportions of childhood overweight/obesity prevalence attributable to maternal overweight, maternal obesity, and excessive gestational weight gain ranged from 10.2% to 21.6%. Relative to the effect of maternal BMI, excessive gestational weight gain only slightly increased the risk of childhood overweight/obesity within each clinical BMI category (p-values for interactions of maternal BMI with gestational weight gain: p = 0.038, p < 0.001, and p = 0.637 in early, mid, and late childhood, respectively). Limitations of this study include the self-report of maternal BMI and gestational weight gain for some of the cohorts, and the potential of residual confounding. Also, as this study only included participants from Europe, North America, and Australia, results need to be interpreted with caution with respect to other populations.

Conclusions

In this study, higher maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain were associated with an increased risk of childhood overweight/obesity, with the strongest effects at later ages. The additional effect of gestational weight gain in women who are overweight or obese before pregnancy is small. Given the large population impact, future intervention trials aiming to reduce the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity should focus on maternal weight status before pregnancy, in addition to weight gain during pregnancy.

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<![CDATA[Trabecular bone score in active or former smokers with and without COPD]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5df35dd5eed0c4845811be

Background

Smoking is a recognized risk factor for osteoporosis. Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a novel texture parameter to evaluate bone microarchitecture. TBS and their main determinants are unknown in active and former smokers.

Objective

To assess TBS in a population of active or former smokers with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and to determine its predictive factors.

Methods

Active and former smokers from a pulmonary clinic were invited to participate. Clinical features were recorded and bone turnover markers (BTMs) measured. Lung function, low dose chest Computed Tomography scans (LDCT), dual energy absorptiometry (DXA) scans were performed and TBS measured. Logistic regression analysis explored the relationship between measured parameters and TBS.

Results

One hundred and forty five patients were included in the analysis, 97 (67.8%) with COPD. TBS was lower in COPD patients (median 1.323; IQR: 0.13 vs 1.48; IQR: 0.16, p = 0.003). Regression analysis showed that a higher body mass index (BMI), younger age, less number of exacerbations and a higher forced expiratory volume-one second (FEV1%) was associated with better TBS (β = 0.005, 95% CI:0.000–0.011, p = 0.032; β = -0.003, 95% CI:-0.007(-)-0.000, p = 0.008; β = -0.019, 95% CI:-0.034(-)-0.004, p = 0.015; β = 0.001, 95% CI:0.000–0.002, p = 0.012 respectively). The same factors with similar results were found in COPD patients.

Conclusions

A significant proportion of active and former smokers with and without COPD have an affected TBS. BMI, age, number of exacerbations and the degree of airway obstruction predicts TBS values in smokers with and without COPD. This important information should be considered when evaluating smokers at risk of osteoporosis.

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<![CDATA[Evidence of a causal relationship between body mass index and psoriasis: A mendelian randomization study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5ca31cd5eed0c48441f191

Background

Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease that has been reported to be associated with obesity. We aimed to investigate a possible causal relationship between body mass index (BMI) and psoriasis.

Methods and findings

Following a review of published epidemiological evidence of the association between obesity and psoriasis, mendelian randomization (MR) was used to test for a causal relationship with BMI. We used a genetic instrument comprising 97 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMI as a proxy for BMI (expected to be much less confounded than measured BMI). One-sample MR was conducted using individual-level data (396,495 individuals) from the UK Biobank and the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway. Two-sample MR was performed with summary-level data (356,926 individuals) from published BMI and psoriasis genome-wide association studies (GWASs). The one-sample and two-sample MR estimates were meta-analysed using a fixed-effect model. To test for a potential reverse causal effect, MR analysis with genetic instruments comprising variants from recent genome-wide analyses for psoriasis were used to test whether genetic risk for this skin disease has a causal effect on BMI.

Published observational data showed an association of higher BMI with psoriasis. A mean difference in BMI of 1.26 kg/m2 (95% CI 1.02–1.51) between psoriasis cases and controls was observed in adults, while a 1.55 kg/m2 mean difference (95% CI 1.13–1.98) was observed in children. The observational association was confirmed in UK Biobank and HUNT data sets. Overall, a 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI was associated with 4% higher odds of psoriasis (meta-analysis odds ratio [OR] = 1.04; 95% CI 1.03–1.04; P = 1.73 × 10−60). MR analyses provided evidence that higher BMI causally increases the odds of psoriasis (by 9% per 1 unit increase in BMI; OR = 1.09 (1.06–1.12) per 1 kg/m2; P = 4.67 × 10−9). In contrast, MR estimates gave little support to a possible causal effect of psoriasis genetic risk on BMI (0.004 kg/m2 change in BMI per doubling odds of psoriasis (−0.003 to 0.011). Limitations of our study include possible misreporting of psoriasis by patients, as well as potential misdiagnosis by clinicians. In addition, there is also limited ethnic variation in the cohorts studied.

Conclusions

Our study, using genetic variants as instrumental variables for BMI, provides evidence that higher BMI leads to a higher risk of psoriasis. This supports the prioritization of therapies and lifestyle interventions aimed at controlling weight for the prevention or treatment of this common skin disease. Mechanistic studies are required to improve understanding of this relationship.

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<![CDATA[Maternal and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with BMI >50: An international collaborative study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c61e935d5eed0c48496f9bb

Objective

To examine the association between maternal BMI>50kg/m2 during pregnancy and maternal and perinatal outcomes.

Materials and methods

An international cohort study was conducted using data from separate national studies in the UK and Australia. Outcomes of pregnant women with BMI>50 were compared to those of pregnant women with BMI<50. Multivariable logistic regression estimated the association between BMI>50 and perinatal and maternal outcomes.

Results

932 pregnant women with BMI>50 were compared with 1232 pregnant women with BMI<50. Pregnant women with BMI>50 were slightly older, more likely to be multiparous, and have pre-existing comorbidities. There were no maternal deaths, however, extremely obese women had a nine-fold increase in the odds of thrombotic events compared to those with a BMI<50 (uOR: 9.39 (95%CI:1.15–76.43)). After adjustment, a BMI>50 during pregnancy had significantly raised odds of preeclampsia/eclampsia (aOR:4.88(95%CI: 3.11–7.65)), caesarean delivery (aOR: 2.77 (95%CI: 2.31–3.32)), induction of labour (aOR: 2.45(95% CI:2.00–2.99)) post caesarean wound infection (aOR:7.25(95%CI: 3.28–16.07)), macrosomia (aOR: 8.05(95%CI: 4.70–13.78)) compared a BMI<50. Twelve of the infants born to women in the extremely obese cohort died in the early neonatal period or were stillborn.

Conclusions

Pregnant women with BMI>50 have a high risk of inferior maternal and perinatal outcomes.

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<![CDATA[Epidemiology of coronary artery disease and stroke and associated risk factors in Gaza community –Palestine]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e6ded5eed0c484ef4073

Aim of study

To determine the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors in the population of Gaza strip in Palestine.

Methods

A cross-sectional stratified cluster sample design was applied in this study. A sample of 2240 participant (1121 males and 1119 females) aged ≥25 years participated in the study. For each individual, trained staff administered a questionnaire, where all variables of interest followed WHO’s STEP wise approach to surveillance chronic disease risk factors (STEPS) (WHO, 2001). Sociodemographic data, anthropometric measure (body mass index, blood pressure), and biochemical test (blood sugar and lipids profiles) were measured. Short International Physical Activity (IPAQ) questionnaire form was used. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression were used with SPSS (version 22.0) to analyze the data.

Results

The most common condition was coronary artery disease (8.3%), followed by stroke events (3%). The associated risk factors were obesity (47.8%), hypertension (28.4%), current smoking account for (23.2%), diabetes mellitus (19.1%), high cholesterol level (8.8%), and high triglycerides level (40.2%). Additionally, the proportion of being physical active was found to be low (48.3%); particularly with increasing age. More than 30% of the population has less than 4 days of consumption of fruit and vegetables per week and 65.9% has less than 2 servings per day.

Conclusion

The burden of CVDs and their associated risk factors is considerable in Gaza and represents a major public health concern. Effective strategies in management, education and healthcare centers are required for an accurate management and implementation of preventive measure in this area.

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