ResearchPad - clostridium https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Broilers divergently selected for digestibility differ for their digestive microbial ecosystems]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_15757 Improving the digestive efficiency of broiler chickens (Gallus gallus) could reduce organic waste, increase the use of alternative feed not used for human consumption and reduce the impact of feed in production costs. By selecting chicken lines divergently for their digestive efficiency, we showed previously that digestive efficiency is under genetic control and that the two resulting divergent lines, D+ (high digestive efficiency or “digestibility +”) and D- (low digestive efficiency or “digestibility -”), also differ for the abundance of specific bacteria in their caeca. Here we perform a more extensive census of the bacteria present in the digestive microbiota of 60 chickens selected for their low apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen balance (AMEn-) or high (AMEn+) digestive efficiency in a [D+ x D-] F8 progeny of 200 individuals. We sequenced the 16S rRNA genes of the ileal, jejunal and caecal microbiotas, and compared the compositions and predicted functions of microbiotas from the different intestinal segments for 20 AMEn+ and 19 AMEn- birds. The intestinal segment of origin was the main factor structuring the samples. The caecal microbiota was the most impacted by the differences in digestive efficiency, with 41 bacterial species with abundances differing between highly and poorly efficient birds. Furthermore, we predicted that the caecal microbiota of efficient birds might be enriched in genes contributing to the degradation of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) from non-starch polysaccharides. These results confirm the impact of the genetic selection led on digestibility on the caecal microbiota taxonomic composition. They open the way toward the identification of specific, causal genes of the host controlling variations in the abundances of bacterial taxons.

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<![CDATA[Instigation of indigenous thermophilic bacterial consortia for enhanced oil recovery from high temperature oil reservoirs]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13812 The purpose of the study involves the development of an anaerobic, thermophilic microbial consortium TERIK from the high temperature reservoir of Gujarat for enhance oil recovery. To isolate indigenous microbial consortia, anaerobic baltch media were prepared and inoculated with the formation water; incubated at 65°C for 10 days. Further, the microbial metabolites were analyzed by gas chromatography, FTIR and surface tension. The efficiency of isolated consortia towards enhancing oil recovery was analyzed through core flood assay. The novelty of studied consortia was that, it produces biomass (600 mg/l), bio-surfactant (325 mg/l), and volatile fatty acids (250 mg/l) at 65°C in the span of 10 days, that are adequate to alter the surface tension (70 to 34 mNm -1) and sweep efficiency of zones facilitating the displacement of oil. TERIK was identified as Clostridium sp. The FTIR spectra of biosurfactant indicate the presence of N-H stretch, amides and polysaccharide. A core flooding assay was designed to explore the potential of TERIK towards enhancing oil recovery. The results showed an effective reduction in permeability at residual oil saturation from 2.14 ± 0.1 to 1.39 ± 0.05 mD and 19% incremental oil recovery.

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<![CDATA[Lean back and wait for the alarm? Testing an automated alarm system for nosocomial outbreaks to provide support for infection control professionals]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N4571fdc0-2a2e-4467-acc9-eeadc2652757

Introduction

Outbreaks of communicable diseases in hospitals need to be quickly detected in order to enable immediate control. The increasing digitalization of hospital data processing offers potential solutions for automated outbreak detection systems (AODS). Our goal was to assess a newly developed AODS.

Methods

Our AODS was based on the diagnostic results of routine clinical microbiological examinations. The system prospectively counted detections per bacterial pathogen over time for the years 2016 and 2017. The baseline data covers data from 2013–2015. The comparative analysis was based on six different mathematical algorithms (normal/Poisson and score prediction intervals, the early aberration reporting system, negative binomial CUSUMs, and the Farrington algorithm). The clusters automatically detected were then compared with the results of our manual outbreak detection system.

Results

During the analysis period, 14 different hospital outbreaks were detected as a result of conventional manual outbreak detection. Based on the pathogens’ overall incidence, outbreaks were divided into two categories: outbreaks with rarely detected pathogens (sporadic) and outbreaks with often detected pathogens (endemic). For outbreaks with sporadic pathogens, the detection rate of our AODS ranged from 83% to 100%. Every algorithm detected 6 of 7 outbreaks with a sporadic pathogen. The AODS identified outbreaks with an endemic pathogen were at a detection rate of 33% to 100%. For endemic pathogens, the results varied based on the epidemiological characteristics of each outbreak and pathogen.

Conclusion

AODS for hospitals based on routine microbiological data is feasible and can provide relevant benefits for infection control teams. It offers in-time automated notification of suspected pathogen clusters especially for sporadically occurring pathogens. However, outbreaks of endemically detected pathogens need further individual pathogen-specific and setting-specific adjustments.

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<![CDATA[Composition of gut microbiota in patients with toxigenic Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile: Comparison between subgroups according to clinical criteria and toxin gene load]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c76fe10d5eed0c484e5b3f2

Data concerning the human microbiota composition during Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile infection (CDI) using next-generation sequencing are still limited. We aimed to confirm key features indicating tcdB positive patients and compare the microbiota composition between subgroups based on toxin gene load (tcdB gene) and presence of significant diarrhea. Ninety-nine fecal samples from 79 tcdB positive patients and 20 controls were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Chao1 index for alpha diversity were calculated and principal coordinate analysis was performed for beta diversity using Quantitative Insights into Microbial Ecology (QIIME) pipeline. The mean relative abundance in each group was compared at phylum, family, and genus levels. There were significant alterations in alpha and beta diversity in tcdB positive patients (both colonizer and CDI) compared with those in the control. The mean Chao1 index of tcdB positive patients was significantly lower than the control group (P<0.001), whereas there was no significant difference between tcdB groups and between colonizer and CDI. There were significant differences in microbiota compositions between tcdB positive patients and the control at phylum, family, and genus levels. Several genera such as Phascolarctobacterium, Lachnospira, Butyricimonas, Catenibacterium, Paraprevotella, Odoribacter, and Anaerostipes were not detected in most CDI cases. We identified several changes in the microbiota of CDI that could be further evaluated as predictive markers. Microbiota differences between clinical subgroups of CDI need to be further studied in larger controlled studies.

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<![CDATA[Salmonella-vectored vaccine delivering three Clostridium perfringens antigens protects poultry against necrotic enteritis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6c75ddd5eed0c4843d0359

Necrotic enteritis is an economically important poultry disease caused by the bacterium Clostridium perfringens. There are currently no necrotic enteritis vaccines commercially available for use in broiler birds, the most important target population. Salmonella-vectored vaccines represent a convenient and effective option for controlling this disease. We used a single attenuated Salmonella vaccine strain, engineered to lyse within the host, to deliver up to three C. perfringens antigens. Two of the antigens were toxoids, based on C. perfringens α-toxin and NetB toxin. The third antigen was fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (Fba), a metabolic enzyme with an unknown role in virulence. Oral immunization with a single Salmonella vaccine strain producing either Fba, α-toxoid and NetB toxoid, or all three antigens, was immunogenic, inducing serum, cellular and mucosal responses against Salmonella and the vectored C. perfringens antigens. All three vaccine strains were partially protective against virulent C. perfringens challenge. The strains delivering Fba only or all three antigens provided the best protection. We also demonstrate that both toxins and Fba are present on the C. perfringens cell surface. The presence of Fba on the cell surface suggests that Fba may function as an adhesin.

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<![CDATA[Carriage and colonization of C. difficile in preterm neonates: A longitudinal prospective study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c76fe0ed5eed0c484e5b398

Background

Premature neonates (PN) present multiple risk factors for high frequencies and high levels of colonization by C. difficile, yet data is missing about this specific pediatric population. Here, we investigated PN C. difficile carriage and colonization dynamics, analyzed the impact of perinatal determinants on colonization, and characterized the isolates.

Methods

A one year longitudinal monocentric prospective cohort study was performed on 121 PN. C. difficile strains isolated from fecal samples on selective medium were identified and characterized by PCR (tpi housekeeping gene; tcdA and tcdB, and binary toxin genes), capillary gel-based electrophoresis PCR-ribotyping, and Multi-Locus Variable-number tandem-repeat Analysis (MLVA).

Results

Of the 379 samples analyzed, 199 (52%) were C. difficile culture positive with the mean levels of C. difficile colonization decreasing significantly (P = .027) over time. During hospitalization, C. difficile colonization frequency increased up to 61% with 95% of the strains belonging to both non-toxigenic PCR-ribotypes (RTs) FR082 (35%) and 032 (60%). After hospital discharge, if a higher diversity in RTs was observed, RTs FR082 and 032 remained predominant (respectively 40% and 28%). MLVA showed clonal relationship within each FR082 and 032 RTs. Ten toxigenic strains (5%) were isolated, all tcdA+/tcdB+ except for one tcdA-/tcdB+, and all being acquired after hospitalization. At 1 week, the only factors found to be linked with a higher frequency of C. difficile colonization were a higher gestational age (P = 0.006) and a higher birth weight (P = 0.016).

Conclusion

The dynamics of C. difficile colonization in PN followed a specific pattern. C. difficile colonization rapidly occurred after birth with a low diversity of non-toxigenic RTs. After hospitalization, non-toxigenic RTs diversity increased. Sporadic carriage of toxigenic strains was observed after hospitalization.

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<![CDATA[Evidence of transmission of Clostridium difficile in asymptomatic patients following admission screening in a tertiary care hospital]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6b262bd5eed0c4842894b4

Background

Clostridium difficile (CD) is the leading cause of infectious health-care associated diarrhea. However, little is known regarding CD carriage and transmission amongst asymptomatic colonizers. We evaluated carriage, characterized strains and examined epidemiologic linkages in asymptomatic colonized CD patients.

Methods

Rectal swabs from asymptomatic patients admitted to the general medicine ward from April 1-June 30 2012 were collected. PCR-confirmed CD colonies were ribotyped and characterized by Modified-Multi Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MMLVA).

Results

1549-swabs were collected from 474-patients. Overall, 50/474(10.6%) were CD PCR-positive, 24/50 were colonized at admission, while 26/50 were first identified > = 72 hours after admission. Amongst the 50 CD PCR-positive patients, 90% were asymptomatically colonized and 80% of individuals carried toxigenic CD-strains, including ribotype-027 (5/45:11%). MMLVA revealed five-clusters involving 15-patients harboring toxigenic (4/5) and non-toxigenic CD strains (1/5). In two clusters, patients were CD positive on admission while in the other three clusters involving 10 patients, we observed CD transmission from asymptomatically colonized patients to 8 previously CD-negative patients.

Conclusions

We identified increasing rates of colonization during admission to medical wards. MMLVA typing effectively discriminated between strains and suggests that 20% of patients with CD colonization acquired their strain(s) from asymptomatically colonized individuals in hospital.

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<![CDATA[Impact of CodY protein on metabolism, sporulation and virulence in Clostridioides difficile ribotype 027]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b52e7d5eed0c4842bd237

Toxin synthesis and endospore formation are two of the most critical factors that determine the outcome of infection by Clostridioides difficile. The two major toxins, TcdA and TcdB, are the principal factors causing damage to the host. Spores are the infectious form of C. difficile, permit survival of the bacterium during antibiotic treatment and are the predominant cell form that leads to recurrent infection. Toxin production and sporulation have their own specific mechanisms of regulation, but they share negative regulation by the global regulatory protein CodY. Determining the extent of such regulation and its detailed mechanism is important for understanding the linkage between two apparently independent biological phenomena and raises the possibility of creating new ways of limiting infection. The work described here shows that a codY null mutant of a hypervirulent (ribotype 027) strain is even more virulent than its parent in a mouse model of infection and that the mutant expresses most sporulation genes prematurely during exponential growth phase. Moreover, examining the expression patterns of mutants producing CodY proteins with different levels of residual activity revealed that expression of the toxin genes is dependent on total CodY inactivation, whereas most sporulation genes are turned on when CodY activity is only partially diminished. These results suggest that, in wild-type cells undergoing nutrient limitation, sporulation genes can be turned on before the toxin genes.

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<![CDATA[Fecal microbiota transplantation for treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection: An updated randomized controlled trial meta-analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5217d8d5eed0c4847946a2

Objectives

Although systematic evaluation has confirmed the efficacy of fresh fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for treatment of recurrent and/or refractory and/or relapse C. difficile infection (RCDI), it lacks the support of well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and the latest guidelines do not optimize the management of FMT. In this paper, we focus on an in-depth study of fresh FMT and fecal infusion times to guide clinical practice.

Methods

We reviewed studies in PubMed, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane library and Cochrane Central written in English. The retrieval period was from the establishment of the databases to September 20th, 2018. The retrieval objects were published RCTs of RCDI treated by fresh FMT. The intervention group was fresh FMT group, while the control group included antibiotic therapy or placebo or frozen FMT or capsule. The primary and secondary outcomes were the clinical remission of diarrhea without relapse after 8–17 weeks and the occurrence of severe adverse events, respectively. Subgroup analysis analyzed the effect of single and multiple fecal infusions. Two authors independently completed the information extraction and assessed risk of bias and overall quality of the evidence.

Results

8 randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria, involving 537 patients (273 in the fresh FMT group and 264 in the control group). The recurrence rate of clinical diarrhea in the fresh FMT group was 11.0% (30/273), which was significantly lower than the control group (24.6%, 65/264; P < 0.05); the pooled relative risk (RR) was 0.38 (95%CI:0.16–0.87; I2 = 67%; P = 0.02) in the fresh FMT group, and the clinical heterogeneity was significant and random effects model was used; However, there was no significant difference neither for the effect of antibiotic treatment/frozen feces transplanted by enema (RR = 1.07; 95%CI: 0.64–1.80; I2 = 0%; P = 0.79) or capsule/frozen feces transplanted by colonoscopy (RR = 0.42; 95%CI: 0.05–3.94; I2 = 43%; P = 0.45) compared with fresh FMT. The subgroup analysis showed that FMT by multiple infusions could effectively and significantly (RR = 0.24; 95%CI:0.10–0.58; I2 = 0%; P = 0.001) improve the clinical diarrhea remission rate. Most mild to moderate adverse events caused by FMT were self-limited and could be quickly alleviated; no severe adverse events happened because of FMT.

Conclusions

Overall, the use of fresh feces for bacterial transplantation was the best efficiency for RCDI compared to antibiotic therapy or placebo. The fecal transmission method by enema was not ideal, but capsules or frozen feces transported by colonoscopy could be an alternative treatment compared to fresh FMT. For patients with severe RCDI, multiple fecal transplants can effectively improve their diarrhea remission rate. The focus of future research should be on how to standardize the production of capsules or frozen feces to better guide the clinical management of RCDI patients by FMT.

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<![CDATA[Oral Candida administration in a Clostridium difficile mouse model worsens disease severity but is attenuated by Bifidobacterium]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c478c89d5eed0c484bd2ed3

Gut fungi may influence the course of Clostridium difficile infection either positively or negatively for the host. Fungi are not prominent in the mouse gut, and C. albicans, the major human gastrointestinal commensal yeast, is in low abundance or absent in mice. Bifidobacterium is one of the probiotics that may attenuate the severity of C. difficile infection. Inflammatory synergy between C. albicans and C. difficile, in gut, may provide a state that more closely resembles human infection and be more suitable for testing probiotic effects. We performed fecal mycobiota analysis and administered C. albicans at 1 day prior to C. difficile dosing. Fecal eukaryotic 18S rDNA analysis demonstrated the presence of Ascomycota, specifically, Candida spp., after oral antibiotics, despite negative fecal fungal culture. C. albicans administration enhanced the severity of the C. difficile infection model as determined by mortality rate, weight loss, gut leakage (FITC-dextran assay), and serum and intestinal tissue cytokines. This occurred without increased fecal C. difficile or bacteremia, in comparison with C. difficile gavage alone. Candida lysate with C. difficile increased IL-8 production from HT-29 and Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cell-lines. Bifidobacterium attenuated the disease severity of the C. difficile plus Candida model. The reduced severity was associated with decreased Candida burdens in feces. In conclusion, gut C. albicans worsened C. difficile infection, possibly through exacerbation of inflammation. Hence, a mouse model of Clostridium difficile infection with C. albicans present in the gut may better model the human patient condition. Gut fungal mycobiome investigation in patients with C. difficile is warranted and may suggest therapeutic targets.

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<![CDATA[Clostridium butyricum population balance model: Predicting dynamic metabolic flux distributions using an objective function related to extracellular glycerol content]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c25450ad5eed0c48442bd72

Background

Extensive experimentation has been conducted to increment 1,3-propanediol (PDO) production using Clostridium butyricum cultures in glycerol, but computational predictions are limited. Previously, we reconstructed the genome-scale metabolic (GSM) model iCbu641, the first such model of a PDO-producing Clostridium strain, which was validated at steady state using flux balance analysis (FBA). However, the prediction ability of FBA is limited for batch and fed-batch cultures, which are the most often employed industrial processes.

Results

We used the iCbu641 GSM model to develop a dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA) approach to predict the PDO production of the Colombian strain Clostridium sp IBUN 158B. First, we compared the predictions of the dynamic optimization approach (DOA), static optimization approach (SOA), and direct approach (DA). We found no differences between approaches, but the DOA simulation duration was nearly 5000 times that of the SOA and DA simulations. Experimental results at glycerol limitation and glycerol excess allowed for validating dynamic predictions of growth, glycerol consumption, and PDO formation. These results indicated a 4.4% error in PDO prediction and therefore validated the previously proposed objective functions. We performed two global sensitivity analyses, finding that the kinetic input parameters of glycerol uptake flux had the most significant effect on PDO predictions. The other input parameters evaluated during global sensitivity analysis were biomass composition (precursors and macromolecules), death constants, and the kinetic parameters of acetic acid secretion flux. These last input parameters, all obtained from other Clostridium butyricum cultures, were used to develop a population balance model (PBM). Finally, we simulated fed-batch cultures, predicting a final PDO production near to 66 g/L, almost three times the PDO predicted in the best batch culture.

Conclusions

We developed and validated a dynamic approach to predict PDO production using the iCbu641 GSM model and the previously proposed objective functions. This validated approach was used to propose a population model and then an increment in predictions of PDO production through fed-batch cultures. Therefore, this dynamic model could predict different scenarios, including its integration into downstream processes to predict technical-economic feasibilities and reducing the time and costs associated with experimentation.

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<![CDATA[Gut microbiota signatures in cystic fibrosis: Loss of host CFTR function drives the microbiota enterophenotype]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c12cf22d5eed0c484913fae

Background

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disorder affecting the respiratory, digestive, reproductive systems and sweat glands. This lethal hereditary disease has known or suspected links to the dysbiosis gut microbiota. High-throughput meta-omics-based approaches may assist in unveiling this complex network of symbiosis modifications.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to provide a predictive and functional model of the gut microbiota enterophenotype of pediatric patients affected by CF under clinical stability.

Methods

Thirty-one fecal samples were collected from CF patients and healthy children (HC) (age range, 1–6 years) and analysed using targeted-metagenomics and metabolomics to characterize the ecology and metabolism of CF-linked gut microbiota. The multidimensional data were low fused and processed by chemometric classification analysis.

Results

The fused metagenomics and metabolomics based gut microbiota profile was characterized by a high abundance of Propionibacterium, Staphylococcus and Clostridiaceae, including Clostridium difficile, and a low abundance of Eggerthella, Eubacterium, Ruminococcus, Dorea, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, and Lachnospiraceae, associated with overexpression of 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), choline, ethanol, propylbutyrate, and pyridine and low levels of sarcosine, 4-methylphenol, uracil, glucose, acetate, phenol, benzaldehyde, and methylacetate. The CF gut microbiota pattern revealed an enterophenotype intrinsically linked to disease, regardless of age, and with dysbiosis uninduced by reduced pancreatic function and only partially related to oral antibiotic administration or lung colonization/infection.

Conclusions

All together, the results obtained suggest that the gut microbiota enterophenotypes of CF, together with endogenous and bacterial CF biomarkers, are direct expression of functional alterations at the intestinal level. Hence, it’s possible to infer that CFTR impairment causes the gut ecosystem imbalance.This new understanding of CF host-gut microbiota interactions may be helpful to rationalize novel clinical interventions to improve the affected children’s nutritional status and intestinal function.

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<![CDATA[Predictive factors of Clostridioides difficile infection in hospitalized patients with new diarrhea: A retrospective cohort study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c117b5ad5eed0c484698cef

Introduction and objective

Diagnostic testing for Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) by nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) cannot distinguish between colonization and infection. A positive NAAT may therefore represent a false positive for infection, since diarrhea due to various aetiologies may occur in hospitalized patients. Our objective was to help answer the question: “does this medical inpatient with diarrhea have CDI?”

Design

We conducted a retrospective cohort study (n = 248) on the Clinical Teaching Units of the Royal Victoria Hospital (Montréal, Canada). Patients were included if they had a NAAT between January 2014 and September 2015 and their admission diagnosis was not CDI. CDI cases and non-CDI cases were compared, and independent predictors of CDI were determined by logistic regression.

Results

Several factors were independently associated with CDI, including: hemodialysis (OR: 13.5, 95% CI: 2.85–63.8), atrial fibrillation (OR: 3.70, 95% CI: 1.52–9.01), whether the patient received empiric treatment (OR: 3.01, 95% CI: 1.04–8.68), systemic antibiotic therapy prior to testing (OR: 4.23, 95% CI: 1.71–10.5), previous positive NAAT (OR: 3.70, 95% CI: 1.41–9.72), and a leukocyte count of 11x109/L or higher (OR: 3.43, 95% CI: 1.42–8.26). The area under the curve was 0.80.

Conclusion

For patients presenting with hospital-onset diarrhea, various parameters can help differentiate between CDI and other causes. A clinical prediction calculator derived from our cohort (http://individual.utoronto.ca/leet/cdiff.html) might assist clinicians in estimating the risk of CDI for inpatients; those with low pre-test probability may not require immediate testing, treatment, nor prolonged isolation.

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<![CDATA[The predictive value of quantitative nucleic acid amplification detection of Clostridium difficile toxin gene for faecal sample toxin status and patient outcome]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c117bd0d5eed0c48469a858

Background

Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains unsettled, despite updated guidelines. We investigated the potential utility of quantitative data from a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) for C. difficile toxin gene (tg) for patient management.

Methods

Using data from the largest ever C. difficile diagnostic study (8853 diarrhoeal samples from 7335 patients), we determined the predicative value of C. difficile tgNAAT (Cepheid Xpert C.diff) low cycle threshold (CT) value for patient toxin positive status, CDI severity, mortality and CDI recurrence. Reference methods for CDI diagnosis were cytotoxicity assay (CTA) and cytotoxigenic culture (CTC).

Results

Of 1281 tgNAAT positive faecal samples, 713 and 917 were CTA and CTC positive, respectively. The median tgNAAT CT for patients who died was 25.5 vs 27.5 for survivors (p = 0.021); for toxin-positivity was 24.9 vs 31.6 for toxin-negative samples (p<0.001) and for patients with a recurrence episode was 25.6 vs 27.3 for those who did not have a recurrent episode (p = 0.111). Following optimal cut-off determination, low CT was defined as ≤25 and was significantly associated with a toxin-positive result (P<0.001, positive predictive value 83.9%), presence of PCR-ribotype 027 (P = 0.025), and mortality (P = 0.032). Recurrence was not associated with low CT (p 0.111).

Conclusions

Low tgNAAT CT could indicate CTA positive patients, have more severe infection, increased risk of mortality and possibly recurrence. Although, the limited specificity of tgNAAT means it cannot be used as a standalone test, it could augment a more timely diagnosis, and optimise management of these at-risk patients.

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<![CDATA[Effects of host genetics and environmental conditions on fecal microbiota composition of pigs]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b8687e040307c73f6bbfec5

Since microbiota may influence the physiology of its host including body weight increase, growth rate or feed intake, in this study we determined the microbiota composition in high or low residual feed intake (HRFI and LRFI) pig lines, of different age and/or subjected to sanitary stress by sequencing the V3/V4 variable region of 16S rRNA genes. Allisonella, Megasphaera, Mitsuokella, Acidaminococcus (all belonging to Firmicutes/class Negativicutes), Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium, Catenibacterium, Butyrivibrio, Erysipelotrichaceae, Holdemania, Olsenella and Collinsella were more abundant in HRFI pigs. On the other hand, 26 genera including Bacteroides, Clostridium sensu stricto, Oscillibacter, Paludibacter, Elusimicrobium, Bilophila, Pyramidobacter and TM7 genera, and Clostridium XI and Clostridium XIVa clusters were more abundant in LRFI than HRFI pigs. Adaptation of microbiota to new diet after weaning was slower in LRFI than in HRFI pigs. Sanitary stress was of relatively minor influence on pig microbiota composition in both tested lines although abundance of Helicobacter increased in LRFI pigs subjected to stress. Selection for residual feed intake thus resulted in a selection of fecal microbiota of different composition. However, we cannot conclude whether residual feed intake was directly affected by different microbiota composition or whether the residual feed intake and microbiota composition are two independent consequences of yet unknown genetic traits differentially selected in the pigs of the two lines.

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<![CDATA[Temporal Differential Proteomes of Clostridium difficile in the Pig Ileal-Ligated Loop Model]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da84ab0ee8fa60b9be24

The impact of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) on healthcare is becoming increasingly recognized as it represents a major cause of nosocomial diarrhea. A rising number of CDI cases and outbreaks have been reported worldwide. Here, we developed the pig ileal-ligated loop model for semi-quantitative analysis comparing temporal differential proteomes in C. difficile following in vivo incubation with in vitro growth using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). Proteins retrieved from the in vitro cultures and the loop contents after 4, 8, and 12 h in vivo incubation were subjected to in-solution digestion, iTRAQ labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and statistical analyses. From a total of 1152 distinct proteins identified in this study, 705 proteins were available for quantitative measures at all time points in both biological and technical replicates; 109 proteins were found to be differentially expressed. With analysis of clusters of orthologous group and protein-protein network interactions, we identified the proteins that might play roles in adaptive responses to the host environment, hence enhancing pathogenicity during CDI. This report represents the quantitative proteomic analysis of C. difficile that demonstrates time-dependent protein expression changes under conditions that mimic in vivo infection and identifies potential candidates for diagnostic or therapeutic measures.

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<![CDATA[Crystal structure and structure-based mutagenesis of actin-specific ADP-ribosylating toxin CPILE-a as novel enterotoxin]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db52ab0ee8fa60bdc74d

Unusual outbreaks of food poisoning in Japan were reported in which Clostridium perfringens was strongly suspected to be the cause based on epidemiological information and fingerprinting of isolates. The isolated strains lack the typical C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) but secrete a new enterotoxin consisting of two components: C. perfringens iota-like enterotoxin-a (CPILE-a), which acts as an enzymatic ADP-ribosyltransferase, and CPILE-b, a membrane binding component. Here we present the crystal structures of apo-CPILE-a, NAD+-CPILE-a and NADH-CPILE-a. Though CPILE-a structure has high similarity with known iota toxin-a (Ia) with NAD+, it possesses two extra-long protruding loops from G262-S269 and E402-K408 that are distinct from Ia. Based on the Ia–actin complex structure, we focused on actin-binding interface regions (I-V) including two protruding loops (PT) and examined how mutations in these regions affect the ADP-ribosylation activity of CPILE-a. Though some site-directed mutagenesis studies have already been conducted on the actin binding site of Ia, in the present study, mutagenesis studies were conducted against both α- and β/γ-actin in CPILE-a and Ia. Interestingly, CPILE-a ADP-ribosylates both α- and β/γ-actin, but its sensitivity towards β/γ-actin is 36% compared with α-actin. Our results contrast to that only C2-I ADP-ribosylates β/γ-actin. We also showed that PT-I and two convex-concave interactions in CPILE-a are important for actin binding. The current study is the first detailed analysis of site-directed mutagenesis in the actin binding region of Ia and CPILE-a against both α- and β/γ-actin.

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<![CDATA[Impact of Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Colonization and Infection among Hospitalized Adults at a District Hospital in Southern Taiwan]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da4bab0ee8fa60b8cdb2

Background

The impact of toxigenic Clostridium difficile colonization (tCDC) in hospitalized patients is not clear.

Aim

To study the significance of tCDC in hospitalized patients.

Methods

A prospective study in the medical wards of a regional hospital was performed from January to June 2011. Fecal samples collected from patients at the time of admission were tested for tcdB by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cultured for C. difficile. The patients were followed up weekly or when they developed diarrhea during hospitalization. If C. difficile was isolated, tcdA and tcdB would be tested by multiplex PCR. The primary outcome was the development of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD).

Findings

Of 168 patients enrolled, females predominated (87, 51.8%), and the mean patient age was 75.4 years old. Approximately 70% of the patients were nursing home residents, and one third had a recent hospitalization within the prior three months. Twenty-eight (16.7%) patients had tCDC, including 16 (9.5%) patients with tCDC at the time of admission and 12 (7.2%) with tCDC during the follow-up period. With regard to the medications taken during hospitalization, the patients were more likely to have tCDC if they had received more than one class of antibiotics than if they had received monotherapy (odds ratio [OR] 6.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–31.56, P = 0.01), particularly if they received a glycopeptide in combination with a cephalosporin or penicillin or a cephalosporin and a carbapenem. More patients with tCDC developed CDAD than those without tCDC (17.9%, 5/28 vs. 1.4%, 2/140, P = 0.002). Overall 7 (4.2%) of the 168 patients developed CDAD, and crude mortality rate of those with and without tCDC was similar (21.4%, 6/28 vs. 19.4%, 27/140, P = 0.79).

Conclusion

Recent use of glycopeptides and β-lactam antibiotics is associated with toxigenic C. difficile colonization, which is a risk factor for developing C. difficile-associated diarrhea.

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<![CDATA[Comparison of the Fecal Microbiota of Healthy Horses and Horses with Colitis by High Throughput Sequencing of the V3-V5 Region of the 16S rRNA Gene]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9fbab0ee8fa60b72036

The intestinal tract houses one of the richest and most complex microbial populations on the planet, and plays a critical role in health and a wide range of diseases. Limited studies using new sequencing technologies in horses are available. The objective of this study was to characterize the fecal microbiome of healthy horses and to compare the fecal microbiome of healthy horses to that of horses with undifferentiated colitis. A total of 195,748 sequences obtained from 6 healthy horses and 10 horses affected by undifferentiated colitis were analyzed. Firmicutes predominated (68%) among healthy horses followed by Bacteroidetes (14%) and Proteobacteria (10%). In contrast, Bacteroidetes (40%) was the most abundant phylum among horses with colitis, followed by Firmicutes (30%) and Proteobacteria (18%). Healthy horses had a significantly higher relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Spirochaetes while horses with colitis had significantly more Fusobacteria. Members of the Clostridia class were more abundant in healthy horses. Members of the Lachnospiraceae family were the most frequently shared among healthy individuals. The species richness reported here indicates the complexity of the equine intestinal microbiome. The predominance of Clostridia demonstrates the importance of this group of bacteria in healthy horses. The marked differences in the microbiome between healthy horses and horses with colitis indicate that colitis may be a disease of gut dysbiosis, rather than one that occurs simply through overgrowth of an individual pathogen.

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<![CDATA[Effects of dietary nutrient levels on microbial community composition and diversity in the ileal contents of pregnant Huanjiang mini-pigs]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db53ab0ee8fa60bdca64

The mammalian gut microbiota influences various metabolic and physiological processes. Substantial metabolic changes occur during a healthy pregnancy that may be related to microbiota composition dynamics. However, the effect of diet on intestinal microbiota composition and diversity during pregnancy remains unclear. We examined the ileal contents of Huanjiang mini-pigs at two pregnancy stages to determine the effects of dietary nutrient levels on such microbial communities. Animals received either a higher-nutrient (HN) diet formulated to meet US National Research Council requirements or a lower-nutrient (LN) diet that met the Chinese National Feeding Standard recommendations. On day 45 or 75 of pregnancy, sows were euthanized and their ileal contents sampled. Experimental diet and pregnancy stage did not affect ileal bacterial richness or diversity, as determined by Chao1 and ACE species richness measures and Shannon and Simpson indices, respectively. The phyla Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, accounting for 69.99–85.44% and 5.82–15.17% of the total reads, respectively, predominated regardless of diet. At the genus level, diet significantly affected the abundance of Lactobacillus species, which was greater in pigs given HN feed (P < 0.05), but had little impact on that of Megasphaera species (P = 0.096). Pregnancy stage had a minimal effect on Proteobacteria numbers (P = 0.053). The number of bacteria of the phylum Firmicutes and genus Lactobacillus decreased, while that of the phylum Proteobacteria, family Enterobacteriaceae, and genus Bacteroides increased between days 45 and 75 of pregnancy. Of the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) measured, only propionate levels changed significantly, with higher concentrations observed on day 45 than on day 75. Our findings indicate that Firmicutes and Proteobacteria dominate pregnant sow ileal bacterial profiles. Excepting a tendency for the number of Proteobacteria to increase as pregnancy progressed, pregnancy stage and diet had little effect on ileal microbiotic composition and diversity and luminal SCFA concentrations.

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