ResearchPad - cyclins https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Decyl caffeic acid inhibits the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells in an autophagy-dependent manner <i>in vitro</i> and <i>in vivo</i>]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13874 The treatment of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells through suppressing the abnormal survival signaling pathways has recently become a significant area of focus. In this study, our results demonstrated that decyl caffeic acid (DC), one of the novel caffeic acid derivatives, remarkedly suppressed the growth of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitory effects of DC on CRC cells were investigated in an in vitro cell model and in vivo using a xenograft mouse model. CRC cells were treated with DC at various dosages (0, 10, 20 and 40 μM), and cell survival, the apoptotic index and the autophagy level were measured using an MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The signaling cascades in CRC were examined by Western blot assay. The anti-cancer effects of DC on tumor growth were examined by using CRC HCT-116 cells implanted in an animal model. Our results indicated that DC differentially suppressed the growth of CRC HT-29 and HCT-116 cells through an enhancement of cell-cycle arrest at the S phase. DC inhibited the expression of cell-cycle regulators, which include cyclin E and cyclin A proteins. The molecular mechanisms of action were correlated to the blockade of the STAT3 and Akt signaling cascades. Strikingly, a high dosage of DC prompted a self-protection action through inducing cell-dependent autophagy in HCT-116 cells. Suppression of autophagy induced cell death in the treatment of DC in HCT-116 cells. DC seemed to inhibit cell proliferation of CRC differentially, and the therapeutic advantage appeared to be autophagy dependent. Moreover, consumption of DC blocked the tumor growth of colorectal adenocarcinoma in an experimental animal model. In conclusion, our results suggested that DC could act as a therapeutic agent through the significant suppression of tumor growth of human CRC cells.

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<![CDATA[CDK contribution to DSB formation and recombination in fission yeast meiosis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c466528d5eed0c484517b92

CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases) associate with different cyclins to form different CDK-complexes that are fundamental for an ordered cell cycle progression, and the coordination of this progression with different aspects of the cellular physiology. During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate recombination that in addition to generating genetic variability are essential for the reductional chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division, and therefore for genome stability and viability of the gametes. However, how meiotic progression and DSB formation are coordinated, and the role CDKs have in the process, is not well understood. We have used single and double cyclin deletion mutants, and chemical inhibition of global CDK activity using the cdc2-asM17 allele, to address the requirement of CDK activity for DSB formation and recombination in fission yeast. We report that several cyclins (Cig1, Cig2, and the meiosis-specific Crs1) control DSB formation and recombination, with a major contribution of Crs1. Moreover, complementation analysis indicates specificity at least for this cyclin, suggesting that different CDK complexes might act in different pathways to promote recombination. Down-regulation of CDK activity impinges on the formation of linear elements (LinEs, protein complexes required for break formation at most DSB hotspot sites). This defect correlates with a reduction in the capability of one structural component (Rec25) to bind chromatin, suggesting a molecular mechanism by which CDK controls break formation. However, reduction in DSB formation in cyclin deletion mutants does not always correspondingly correlate with a proportional reduction in meiotic recombination (crossovers), suggesting that specific CDK complexes might also control downstream events balancing repair pathways. Therefore, our work points to CDK regulation of DSB formation as a key conserved feature in the initiation of meiotic recombination, in addition to provide a view of possible roles CDK might have in other steps of the recombination process.

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<![CDATA[EBNA3C facilitates RASSF1A downregulation through ubiquitin-mediated degradation and promoter hypermethylation to drive B-cell proliferation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c3d00ded5eed0c484036313

EBV latent antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is essential for EBV-induced primary B-cell transformation. Infection by EBV induces hypermethylation of a number of tumor suppressor genes, which contributes to the development of human cancers. The Ras association domain family isoform 1A (RASSF1A) is a cellular tumor suppressor, which regulates a broad range of cellular functions, including apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, mitotic arrest, and migration. However, the expression of RASSF1A is lost in many human cancers by epigenetic silencing. In the present study, we showed that EBNA3C promoted B-cell transformation by specifically suppressing the expression of RASSF1A. EBNA3C directly interacted with RASSF1A and induced RASSF1A degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent pathway. SCFSkp2, an E3-ubiquitin ligase, was recruited by EBNA3C to enhance RASSF1A degradation. Moreover, EBNA3C decreased the transcriptional activity of RASSF1A promoter by enhancing its methylation through EBNA3C-mediated modulation of DNMTs expression. EBNA3C also inhibited RASSF1A-mediated cell apoptosis, disrupted RASSF1A-mediated microtubule and chromosomal stability, and promoted cell proliferation by upregulating Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E expression. Our data provides new details, which sheds light on additional mechanisms by which EBNA3C can induce B-cell transformation. This will also facilitate the development of novel therapeutic approaches through targeting of the RASSF1A pathway.

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<![CDATA[NRF2-regulated cell cycle arrest at early stage of oxidative stress response mechanism]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c08419dd5eed0c484fca39d

Oxidative stress results in activation of several signal transduction pathways controlled by the PERK-substrate NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2); meanwhile the ongoing cell division cycle has to be blocked. It has been recently shown that Cyclin D1 got immediately down-regulated via PERK pathway in response to oxidative stress leading to cell cycle arrest. However, the effect of NRF2 on cell cycle regulation has not been explored yet. We aimed to reveal a crosstalk between PERK-substrate NRF2 and the key elements of cell cycle regulatory network upon oxidative stress using molecular biological techniques- Although Cyclin D1 level remained constant, its activity was blocked by various stoichiometric inhibitors (such as p15, p21 and p27) even at low level of oxidative stress. The activity of these CDK inhibitors completely disappeared, when the addition of oxidative agent was combined with silencing of either PERK or NRF2.This further confirms the important role of NRF2 in blocking Cyclin D1 with stoichiometric inhibitors at early stage of oxidative stress.

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<![CDATA[Evidence for a role of spindle matrix formation in cell cycle progression by antibody perturbation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c084217d5eed0c484fcbbc4

In Drosophila it has recently been demonstrated that a spindle matrix in the form of a membrane-less macromolecular assembly embeds the microtubule-based spindle apparatus. In addition, two of its constituents, Megator and Chromator, were shown to function as spatial regulators of spindle checkpoint proteins. However, whether the spindle matrix plays a wider functional role in spatially regulating cell cycle progression factors was unknown. Here using a live imaging approach we provide evidence that a number of key cell cycle proteins such as Cyclin B, Polo, and Ran co-localize with the spindle matrix during mitosis. Furthermore, prevention of spindle matrix formation by injection of a function blocking antibody against the spindle matrix protein Chromator results in cell cycle arrest prior to nuclear envelope breakdown. In such embryos the spatial dynamics of Polo and Cyclin B enrichment at the nuclear rim and kinetochores is abrogated and Polo is not imported into the nucleus. This is in contrast to colchicine-arrested embryos where the wild-type dynamics of these proteins are maintained. Taken together these results suggest that spindle matrix formation may be a general requirement for the localization and proper dynamics of cell cycle factors promoting signaling events leading to cell cycle progression.

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<![CDATA[Characterization of Cyclin E Expression in Multiple Myeloma and Its Functional Role in Seliciclib-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9d7ab0ee8fa60b66565

Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a lymphatic neoplasm characterized by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cell that eventually develops resistance to chemotherapy. Drug resistance, differentiation block and increased survival of the MM tumor cells result from high genomic instability. Chromosomal translocations, the most common genomic alterations in MM, lead to dysregulation of cyclin D, a regulatory protein that governs the activation of key cell cycle regulator – cyclin dependent kinase (CDK). Genomic instability was reported to be affected by over expression of another CDK regulator - cyclin E (CCNE). This occurs early in tumorigenesis in various lymphatic malignancies including CLL, NHL and HL. We therefore sought to investigate the role of cyclin E in MM. CCNE1 expression was found to be heterogeneous in various MM cell lines (hMMCLs). Incubation of hMMCLs with seliciclib, a selective CDK-inhibitor, results in apoptosis which is accompanied by down regulation of MCL1 and p27. Ectopic over expression of CCNE1 resulted in reduced sensitivity of the MM tumor cells in comparison to the paternal cell line, whereas CCNE1 silencing with siRNA increased the cell sensitivity to seliciclib. Adhesion to FN of hMMCLs was prevented by seliciclib, eliminating adhesion–mediated drug resistance of MM cells. Combination of seliciclib with flavopiridol effectively reduced CCNE1 and CCND1 protein levels, increased subG1 apoptotic fraction and promoted MM cell death in BMSCs co-culture conditions, therefore over-coming stroma-mediated protection. We suggest that seliciclib may be considered as essential component of modern anti MM drug combination therapy.

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<![CDATA[Cohesion Fatigue Explains Why Pharmacological Inhibition of the APC/C Induces a Spindle Checkpoint-Dependent Mitotic Arrest]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db0eab0ee8fa60bcb51e

The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) delays the onset of anaphase in response to unattached kinetochores by inhibiting the activity of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Once all the chromosomes have bioriented, SAC signalling is somehow silenced, which allows progression through mitosis. Recent studies suggest that the APC/C itself participates in SAC silencing by targeting an unknown factor for proteolytic degradation. Key evidence in favour of this model comes from the use of proTAME, a small molecule inhibitor of the APC/C. In cells, proTAME causes a mitotic arrest that is SAC-dependent. Even though this observation comes at odds with the current view that the APC/C acts downstream of the SAC, it was nonetheless argued that these results revealed a role for APC/C activity in SAC silencing. However, we show here that the mitotic arrest induced by proTAME is due to the induction of cohesion fatigue, a phenotype that is caused by the loss of sister chromatid cohesion following a prolonged metaphase. Under these conditions, the SAC is re-activated and APC/C inhibition is maintained independently of proTAME. Therefore, these results provide a simpler explanation for why the proTAME-induced mitotic arrest is also dependent on the SAC. While these observations question the notion that the APC/C is required for SAC silencing, we nevertheless show that APC/C activity does partially contribute to its own release from inhibitory complexes, and importantly, this does not depend on proteasome-mediated degradation.

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<![CDATA[Viscolin Inhibits In Vitro Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration and Neointimal Hyperplasia In Vivo]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e4ab0ee8fa60b6ab97

Viscolin, an extract of Viscum coloratum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties against harmful stimuli. The aim of the study was to examine the anti-proliferative effects of viscolin on platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF)-treated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and identify the underlying mechanism responsible for these effects. Viscolin reduced the PDGF-BB-induced HASMC proliferation and migration in vitro; it also arrested HASMCs in the G0/G1 phase by decreasing the protein expression of Cyclin D1, CDK2, Cyclin E, CDK4, and p21Cip1 as detected by Western blot analysis. These effects may be mediated by reduced PDGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK, and P38, but not AKT as well as inhibition of PDGF-mediated nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 and activator protein 1 (AP-1)/c-fos activation. Furthermore, viscolin pre-treatment significantly reduced neointimal hyperplasia of an endothelial-denuded femoral artery in vivo. Taken together, viscolin attenuated PDGF–BB-induced HASMC proliferation in vitro and reduced neointimal hyperplasia in vivo. Thus, viscolin may represent a therapeutic candidate for the prevention and treatment of vascular proliferative diseases.

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<![CDATA[Age-Dependent Oxidative DNA Damage Does Not Correlate with Reduced Proliferation of Cardiomyocytes in Humans]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dadeab0ee8fa60bbb137

Background

Postnatal human cardiomyocyte proliferation declines rapidly with age, which has been suggested to be correlated with increases in oxidative DNA damage in mice and plays an important role in regulating cardiomyocyte proliferation. However, the relationship between oxidative DNA damage and age in humans is unclear.

Methods

Sixty right ventricular outflow myocardial tissue specimens were obtained from ventricular septal defect infant patients during routine congenital cardiac surgery. These specimens were divided into three groups based on age: group A (age 0–6 months), group B (age, 7–12 months), and group C (>12 months). Each tissue specimen was subjected to DNA extraction, RNA extraction, and immunofluorescence.

Results

Immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR analysis revealed that DNA damage markers—mitochondrial DNA copy number, oxoguanine 8, and phosphorylated ataxia telangiectasia mutated—were highest in Group B. However immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR demonstrated that two cell proliferation markers, Ki67 and cyclin D2, were decreased with age. In addition, wheat germ agglutinin-staining indicated that the average size of cardiomyocytes increased with age.

Conclusions

Oxidative DNA damage of cardiomyocytes was not correlated positively with age in human beings. Oxidative DNA damage is unable to fully explain the reduced proliferation of human cardiomyocytes.

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<![CDATA[The involvement and possible mechanism of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be029f

Thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (TOLF) is characterized by ectopic bone formation in the ligamentum flavum and is considered to be a leading cause of thoracic spinal canal stenosis and myelopathy. However, the underlying etiology is not well understood. An iTRAQ proteomics was used to reveal the involvement of inflammation factors in TOLF. TNF-α is a pro-inflammatory cytokine implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. Protein profiling analysis showed that the protein level of TNF-α increased in the ossified ligamentum flavum of TOLF, which was confirmed by western blot. The effects of TNF-α on primary ligamentum flavum cells was examined. Cell proliferation assay demonstrated that primary cells from the ossified ligamentum flavum of TOLF grew faster than the control. Flow cytometry assay indicated that the proportions of cells in S phase of cell cycle of primary cells increased after TNF-α stimulation. To address the effect of TNF-α on gene expression, primary cells were derived from ligamentum flavum of TOLF patients. Culture cells were stimulated by TNF-α. RNA was isolated and analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. G1/S-specific proteins cyclin D1 and c-Myc were upregulated after TNF-α stimulation. On the other hand, osteoblast differentiation related genes such as Bmp2 and Osterix (Osx) were upregulated in the presence of TNF-α. TNF-α activated Osx expression in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, a specific mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK inhibitor U0126, but not JNK kinase inhibitor SP600125, abrogated TNF-α activation of Osx expression. This suggests that TNF-α activates Osx expression through the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK pathway. Taken together, we provide the evidence to support that TNF-α involves in TOLF probably through regulating cell proliferation via cyclin D1 and c-Myc, and promoting osteoblast differentiation via Osx.

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<![CDATA[Expression of a Constitutively Active Calcineurin Encoded by an Intron-Retaining mRNA in Follicular Keratinocytes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dae0ab0ee8fa60bbb75a

Hair growth is a highly regulated cyclical process. Immunosuppressive immunophilin ligands such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 are known as potent hair growth modulatory agents in rodents and humans that induce active hair growth and inhibit hair follicle regression. The immunosuppressive effectiveness of these drugs has been generally attributed to inhibition of T cell activation through well-characterized pathways. Specifically, CsA and FK506 bind to intracellular proteins, principally cyclophilin A and FKBP12, respectively, and thereby inhibit the phosphatase calcineurin (Cn). The calcineurin (Cn)/NFAT pathway has an important, but poorly understood, role in the regulation of hair follicle development. Here we show that a novel-splicing variant of calcineurin Aß CnAß-FK, which is encoded by an intron-retaining mRNA and is deficient in the autoinhibitory domain, is predominantly expressed in mature follicular keratinocytes but not in the proliferating keratinocytes of rodents. CnAß-FK was weakly sensitive to Ca2+ and dephosphorylated NFATc2 under low Ca2+ levels in keratinocytes. Inhibition of Cn/NFAT induced hair growth in nude mice. Cyclin G2 was identified as a novel target of the Cn/NFATc2 pathway and its expression in follicular keratinocytes was reduced by inhibition of Cn/NFAT. Overexpression of cyclin G2 arrested the cell cycle in follicular keratinocytes in vitro and the Cn inhibitor, cyclosporin A, inhibited nuclear localization of NFATc2, resulting in decreased cyclin G2 expression in follicular keratinocytes of rats in vivo. We therefore suggest that the calcineurin/NFAT pathway has a unique regulatory role in hair follicle development.

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<![CDATA[E2F1-Mediated Upregulation of p19INK4d Determines Its Periodic Expression during Cell Cycle and Regulates Cellular Proliferation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da14ab0ee8fa60b7ab9f

Background

A central aspect of development and disease is the control of cell proliferation through regulation of the mitotic cycle. Cell cycle progression and directionality requires an appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators whose expression must fluctuate in a coordinated manner. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, has a unique feature that distinguishes it from the remaining INK4 and makes it a likely candidate for contributing to the directionality of the cell cycle. p19INK4d mRNA and protein levels accumulate periodically during the cell cycle under normal conditions, a feature reminiscent of cyclins.

Methodology/Principal Findings

In this paper, we demonstrate that p19INK4d is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1 through two response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter. Ablation of this regulation reduced p19 levels and restricted its expression during the cell cycle, reflecting the contribution of a transcriptional effect of E2F1 on p19 periodicity. The induction of p19INK4d is delayed during the cell cycle compared to that of cyclin E, temporally separating the induction of these proliferative and antiproliferative target genes. Specific inhibition of the E2F1-p19INK4d pathway using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that block E2F1 binding on p19 promoter, stimulated cell proliferation and increased the fraction of cells in S phase.

Conclusions/Significance

The results described here support a model of normal cell cycle progression in which, following phosphorylation of pRb, free E2F induces cyclin E, among other target genes. Once cyclinE/CDK2 takes over as the cell cycle driving kinase activity, the induction of p19 mediated by E2F1 leads to inhibition of the CDK4,6-containing complexes, bringing the G1 phase to an end. This regulatory mechanism constitutes a new negative feedback loop that terminates the G1 phase proliferative signal, contributing to the proper coordination of the cell cycle and provides an additional mechanism to limit E2F activity.

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<![CDATA[The G1/S Specific Cyclin D2 Is a Regulator of HIV-1 Restriction in Non-proliferating Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dad3ab0ee8fa60bb70ad

Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population strongly influenced by differentiation stimuli that become susceptible to HIV-1 infection after inactivation of the restriction factor SAMHD1 by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). Here, we have used primary human monocyte-derived macrophages differentiated through different stimuli to evaluate macrophage heterogeneity on cell activation and proliferation and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Stimulation of monocytes with GM-CSF induces a non-proliferating macrophage population highly restrictive to HIV-1 infection, characterized by the upregulation of the G1/S-specific cyclin D2, known to control early steps of cell cycle progression. Knockdown of cyclin D2, enhances HIV-1 replication in GM-CSF macrophages through inactivation of SAMHD1 restriction factor by phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that cyclin D2 forms a complex with CDK4 and p21, a factor known to restrict HIV-1 replication by affecting the function of the downstream cascade that leads to SAMHD1 deactivation. Thus, we demonstrate that cyclin D2 acts as regulator of cell cycle proteins affecting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in non-proliferating macrophages.

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<![CDATA[Probing the Role of Nascent Helicity in p27 Function as a Cell Cycle Regulator]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dafdab0ee8fa60bc5740

p27 regulates the activity of Cdk complexes which are the principal governors of phase transitions during cell division. Members of the p27 family of proteins, which also includes p21 and p57, are called the Cip/Kip cyclin-dependent kinase regulators (CKRs). Interestingly, the Cip/Kip CKRs play critical roles in cell cycle regulation by being intrinsically unstructured, a characteristic contrary to the classical structure-function paradigm. They exhibit nascent helicity which has been localized to a segment referred to as sub-domain LH. The nascent helicity of this sub-domain is conserved and we hypothesize that it is an important determinant of their functional properties. To test this hypothesis, we successfully designed and prepared p27 variants in which domain LH was either more or less helical with respect to the wild-type protein. Thermal denaturation experiments showed that the ternary complexes of the p27 variants bound to Cdk2/Cyclin A were less stable compared to the wild-type complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments showed a decrease in the enthalpy of binding for all the mutants with respect to p27. The free energies of binding varied within a much narrower range. In vitro Cdk2 inhibition assays showed that the p27 variants exhibited disparate inhibitory potencies. Furthermore, when over-expressed in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast cells, the less helical p27 variants were less effective in causing cell cycle arrest relative to the wild-type p27. Our results indicate that the nascent helicity of sub-domain LH plays a key role mediating the biological function of p27.

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<![CDATA[The Silencing of CCND2 by Promoter Aberrant Methylation in Renal Cell Cancer and Analysis of the Correlation between CCND2 Methylation Status and Clinical Features]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da0cab0ee8fa60b77fed

Cyclin D2 (CCND2) is a member of the D-type cyclins, which plays a pivotal role in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and malignant transformation. However, its expression status and relative regulation mechanism remains unclear in renal cell cancer (RCC). In our study, the mRNA expression level of CCND2 is down-regulated in 22/23 paired RCC tissues (p<0.05). In addition, its protein expression level is also decreased in 43/43 RCC tumor tissues compared with its corresponding non-malignant tissues (p<0.001). We further detected that CCND2 was down-regulated or silenced in 6/7 RCC cell lines, but expressed in “normal” human proximal tubular (HK-2) cell line. Subsequently, MSP and BGS results showed that the methylation status in CCND2 promoter region is closely associated with its expression level in RCC cell lines. Treatment with 5-Aza with or without TSA restored CCND2 expression in several methylated RCC cell lines. Among the 102 RCC tumors, methylation of CCND2 was detected in 29/102 (28%) cases. Only 2/23 (8.7%) adjacent non-malignant tissues showed methylation. We then analyzed the correlation of clinical features and its promoter methylation. Collectively, our data suggested that loss of CCND2 expression is closely associated with the promoter aberrant methylation.

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<![CDATA[p21 as a Transcriptional Co-Repressor of S-Phase and Mitotic Control Genes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da0fab0ee8fa60b78f03

It has been previously described that p21 functions not only as a CDK inhibitor but also as a transcriptional co-repressor in some systems. To investigate the roles of p21 in transcriptional control, we studied the gene expression changes in two human cell systems. Using a human leukemia cell line (K562) with inducible p21 expression and human primary keratinocytes with adenoviral-mediated p21 expression, we carried out microarray-based gene expression profiling. We found that p21 rapidly and strongly repressed the mRNA levels of a number of genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. One of the most strongly down-regulated genes was CCNE2 (cyclin E2 gene). Mutational analysis in K562 cells showed that the N-terminal region of p21 is required for repression of gene expression of CCNE2 and other genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that p21 was bound to human CCNE2 and other p21-repressed genes gene in the vicinity of the transcription start site. Moreover, p21 repressed human CCNE2 promoter-luciferase constructs in K562 cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the CDE motif is present in most of the promoters of the p21-regulated genes. Altogether, the results suggest that p21 exerts a repressive effect on a relevant number of genes controlling S phase and mitosis. Thus, p21 activity as inhibitor of cell cycle progression would be mediated not only by the inhibition of CDKs but also by the transcriptional down-regulation of key genes.

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<![CDATA[Fluorescent Peptide Biosensor for Probing the Relative Abundance of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Living Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da05ab0ee8fa60b75688

Cyclin-dependant kinases play a central role in coordinating cell growth and division, and in sustaining proliferation of cancer cells, thereby constituting attractive pharmacological targets. However, there are no direct means of assessing their relative abundance in living cells, current approaches being limited to antigenic and proteomic analysis of fixed cells. In order to probe the relative abundance of these kinases directly in living cells, we have developed a fluorescent peptide biosensor with biligand affinity for CDKs and cyclins in vitro, that retains endogenous CDK/cyclin complexes from cell extracts, and that bears an environmentally-sensitive probe, whose fluorescence increases in a sensitive fashion upon recognition of its targets. CDKSENS was introduced into living cells, through complexation with the cell-penetrating carrier CADY2 and applied to assess the relative abundance of CDK/Cyclins through fluorescence imaging and ratiometric quantification. This peptide biosensor technology affords direct and sensitive readout of CDK/cyclin complex levels, and reports on differences in complex formation when tampering with a single CDK or cyclin. CDKSENS further allows for detection of differences between different healthy and cancer cell lines, thereby enabling to distinguish cells that express high levels of these heterodimeric kinases, from cells that present decreased or defective assemblies. This fluorescent biosensor technology provides information on the overall status of CDK/Cyclin complexes which cannot be obtained through antigenic detection of individual subunits, in a non-invasive fashion which does not require cell fixation or extraction procedures. As such it provides promising perspectives for monitoring the response to therapeutics that affect CDK/Cyclin abundance, for cell-based drug discovery strategies and fluorescence-based cancer diagnostics.

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<![CDATA[F-Box Protein Specificity for G1 Cyclins Is Dictated by Subcellular Localization]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daf6ab0ee8fa60bc2ffc

Levels of G1 cyclins fluctuate in response to environmental cues and couple mitotic signaling to cell cycle entry. The G1 cyclin Cln3 is a key regulator of cell size and cell cycle entry in budding yeast. Cln3 degradation is essential for proper cell cycle control; however, the mechanisms that control Cln3 degradation are largely unknown. Here we show that two SCF ubiquitin ligases, SCFCdc4 and SCFGrr1, redundantly target Cln3 for degradation. While the F-box proteins (FBPs) Cdc4 and Grr1 were previously thought to target non-overlapping sets of substrates, we find that Cdc4 and Grr1 each bind to all 3 G1 cyclins in cell extracts, yet only Cln3 is redundantly targeted in vivo, due in part to its nuclear localization. The related cyclin Cln2 is cytoplasmic and exclusively targeted by Grr1. However, Cdc4 can interact with Cdk-phosphorylated Cln2 and target it for degradation when cytoplasmic Cdc4 localization is forced in vivo. These findings suggest that Cdc4 and Grr1 may share additional redundant targets and, consistent with this possibility, grr1Δ cdc4-1 cells demonstrate a CLN3-independent synergistic growth defect. Our findings demonstrate that structurally distinct FBPs are capable of interacting with some of the same substrates; however, in vivo specificity is achieved in part by subcellular localization. Additionally, the FBPs Cdc4 and Grr1 are partially redundant for proliferation and viability, likely sharing additional redundant substrates whose degradation is important for cell cycle progression.

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<![CDATA[Effect of Butyrate on Collagen Expression, Cell Viability, Cell Cycle Progression and Related Proteins Expression of MG-63 Osteoblastic Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9dfab0ee8fa60b69124

Aims

Butyric acid is one major metabolic product generated by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria of periodontal and root canal infection. Butyric acid affects the activity of periodontal cells such as osteoblasts. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of butyrate on MG-63 osteoblasts.

Methods

MG-63 cells were exposed to butyrate and cell viability was estimated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and cell cycle-related proteins were measured by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting or immunofluorescent staining. Cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence flow cytometry.

Results

Exposure to butyrate suppressed cell proliferation, and induced G2/M (8 and 16 mM) cell cycle arrest of MG-63 cells. Some cell apoptosis was noted. The mRNA expression of cdc2 and cyclin-B1 decreased after exposure to butyrate. The protein expression of type I collagen, cdc2 and cyclin B1 were decreased, whereas the expression of p21, p27 and p57 was stimulated. Under the treatment of butyrate, ROS production in MG-63 cells markedly increased.

Conclusions

The secretion of butyric acid by periodontal and root canal microorganisms may inhibit bone cell growth and matrix turnover. This is possibly due to induction of cell cycle arrest and ROS generation and inhibition of collagen expression. These results suggest the involvement of butyric acid in the pathogenesis of periodontal and periapical tissue destruction by impairing bone healing responses.

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<![CDATA[Meiotic failure in cyclin A1-deficient mouse spermatocytes triggers apoptosis through intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways and 14-3-3 proteins]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdc025

Cyclin A1 (Ccna1), a member of the mammalian A type cyclins, is most abundantly expressed in spermatocytes and is essential for spermatogenesis in the mouse. Ccna1- deficient spermatocytes arrest at late meiotic prophase and undergo apoptosis. To further delineate the mechanisms and key factors involved in this process, we have examined changes in expression of genes involved in both intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways that trigger apoptosis in the mutant spermatocytes. Our results show that both pathways are involved, and that the factors involved in the intrinsic pathway were expressed earlier than those involved in the extrinsic pathway. We have also begun to identify in vivo Ccna1-interacting proteins, using an unbiased biochemical approach, and identified 14-3-3, a key regulator of apoptosis, as a Ccna1-interacting protein. Expression levels of 14-3-3 proteins remain unchanged between wild type and mutant testes but there were differences in the subcellular distribution. In wild type control, 14-3-3 is detected in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions whereas it is restricted to the cytoplasm in mutant testes. This differential distribution of 14-3-3 may contribute to the induction of apoptosis in Ccna1-deficient spermatocytes. These results provide insight into the apoptotic mechanisms and pathways that are triggered when progression through the meiotic cell cycle is defective in male gametogenesis.

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