ResearchPad - cytokinins https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Response of cytokinins and nitrogen metabolism in the fronds of <i>Pteris</i> sp. under arsenic stress]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14748 Given the close relationship between cytokinins (CKs), photosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism, this study assessed the effect of arsenic (As) contamination on these metabolic components in the As-hyperaccumulators Pteris cretica L. var. Albo-lineata (Pc-A) and var. Parkerii (Pc-P) as well as the As-non-hyperaccumulator Pteris straminea Mett. ex Baker (Ps). The ferns were cultivated in a pot experiment for 23 weeks in soil spiked with As at the levels 20 and 100 mg·kg-1. For the purpose of this study, the CKs were placed into five functionally different groups according to their structure and physiological roles: bioactive forms (bCKs; CK free bases); inactive or weakly active forms (dCKs; CK N-glucosides); transport forms (tCKs; CK ribosides); storage forms (sCKs; O-glucosides); and primary products of CK biosynthesis (ppbCKs; CK nucleotides). An important finding was higher CKs total content, accumulation of sCKs and reduction of dCKs in As-hyperaccumulators in contrast to non-hyperaccumulator ferns. A significant depletion of C resources was confirmed in ferns, especially Ps, which was determined by measuring the photosynthetic rate and chlorophyll fluorescence. A fluorescence decrease signified a reduction in the C/N ratio, inducing an increase of bioactive CKs forms in Pc-P and Ps. The impact of As on N utilization was significant in As-hyperaccumulators. The glutamic acid/glutamine ratio, an indicator of primary N assimilation, diminished in all ferns with increased As level in the soil. In conclusion, the results indicate a large phenotypic diversity of Pteris species to As and suggest that the CKs composition and the glutamic acid/glutamine ratio can be used as a tool to diagnose As stress in plants.

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<![CDATA[Solanum lycopersicum GOLDEN 2-LIKE 2 transcription factor affects fruit quality in a light- and auxin-dependent manner]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6c75a8d5eed0c4843cff97

Plastids are organelles responsible for essential aspects of plant development, including carbon fixation and synthesis of several secondary metabolites. Chloroplast differentiation and activity are highly regulated by light, and several proteins involved in these processes have been characterised. Such is the case of the GOLDEN 2-LIKE (GLK) transcription factors, which induces the expression of genes related to chloroplast differentiation and photosynthesis. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) genome harbours two copies of this gene, SlGLK1 and SlGLK2, each with distinct expression patterns. While the former predominates in leaves, the latter is mainly expressed in fruits, precisely at the pedicel region. During tomato domestication, the selection of fruits with uniform ripening fixed the mutation Slglk2, nowadays present in most cultivated varieties, what penalised fruit metabolic composition. In this study, we investigated how SlGLK2 is regulated by light, auxin and cytokinin and determined the effect of SlGLK2 on tocopherol (vitamin E) and sugar metabolism, which are components of the fruit nutritional and industrial quality. To achieve this, transcriptional profiling and biochemical analysis were performed throughout fruit development and ripening from SlGLK2, Slglk2, SlGLK2-overexpressing genotypes, as well as from phytochrome and hormonal deficient mutants. The results revealed that SlGLK2 expression is regulated by phytochrome-mediated light perception, yet this gene can induce chloroplast differentiation even in a phytochrome-independent manner. Moreover, auxin was found to be a negative regulator of SlGLK2 expression, while SlGLK2 enhances cytokinin responsiveness. Additionally, SlGLK2 enhanced chlorophyll content in immature green fruits, leading to an increment in tocopherol level in ripe fruits. Finally, SlGLK2 overexpression resulted in higher total soluble solid content, possibly by the regulation of sugar metabolism enzyme-encoding genes. The results obtained here shed light on the regulatory network that interconnects SlGLK2, phytohormones and light signal, promoting the plastidial activity and consequently, influencing the quality of tomato fruit.

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<![CDATA[ARR22 overexpression can suppress plant Two-Component Regulatory Systems]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6b2616d5eed0c4842892c3

In plants, several developmental processes are co-coordinated by cytokinins via phosphorylation dependent processes of the Two-Component System (TCS). An outstanding challenge is to track phosphorelay flow from cytokinin perception to its molecular outputs, of which gene activation plays a major role. To address this issue, a kinetic-based reporter system was expounded to track TCS phosphorelay activity in vivo that can distinguish between basal and cytokinin dependent effects of overexpressed TCS members. The TCS phosphorelay can be positively activated by cytokinin and inhibited by pharmaceuticals or naturally interfering components. In this case we took advantage of the phosphohistidine-phosphatase Arabidopsis Response Regulator (ARR) 22 and investigated its phosphocompetition with other TCS members in regulating promoters of ARR5 and WUS in Arabidopsis thaliana cell culture protoplasts. In congruency with the proposed function of ARR22, overexpression of ARR22 blocked the activation of all B-type ARRs in this study in a TCS dependent manner. Furthermore, this effect could not be mimicked by A-type response regulator overexpression or compensated by AHP overexpression. Compared to other reporter assays, ours mimicked effects previously observed only in transgenic plants for all of the TCS proteins studied, suggesting that it is possible to expose phosphocompetition. Thus, our approach can be used to investigate gene signaling networks involving the TCS by leveraging ARR22 as a TCS inhibitor along with B-type ARR overexpression.

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<![CDATA[Tangled history of a multigene family: The evolution of ISOPENTENYLTRANSFERASE genes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b6da1ae463d7e4dccc5faea

ISOPENTENYLTRANSFERASE (IPT) genes play important roles in the initial steps of cytokinin synthesis, exist in plant and pathogenic bacteria, and form a multigene family in plants. Protein domain searches revealed that bacteria and plant IPT proteins were to assigned to different protein domains families in the Pfam database, namely Pfam IPT (IPTPfam) and Pfam IPPT (IPPTPfam) families, both are closely related in the P-loop NTPase clan. To understand the origin and evolution of the genes, a species matrix was assembled across the tree of life and intensively in plant lineages. The IPTPfam domain was only found in few bacteria lineages, whereas IPPTPfam is common except in Archaea and Mycoplasma bacteria. The bacterial IPPTPfam domain miaA genes were shown as ancestral of eukaryotic IPPTPfam domain genes. Plant IPTs diversified into class I, class II tRNA-IPTs, and Adenosine-phosphate IPTs; the class I tRNA-IPTs appeared to represent direct successors of miaA genes were found in all plant genomes, whereas class II tRNA-IPTs originated from eukaryotic genes, and were found in prasinophyte algae and in euphyllophytes. Adenosine-phosphate IPTs were only found in angiosperms. Gene duplications resulted in gene redundancies with ubiquitous expression or diversification in expression. In conclusion, it is shown that IPT genes have a complex history prior to the protein family split, and might have experienced losses or HGTs, and gene duplications that are to be likely correlated with the rise in morphological complexity involved in fine tuning cytokinin production.

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<![CDATA[Dynamic patterns of expression for genes regulating cytokinin metabolism and signaling during rice inflorescence development]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db52ab0ee8fa60bdc8b1

Inflorescence development in cereals, including such important crops as rice, maize, and wheat, directly affects grain number and size and is a key determinant of yield. Cytokinin regulates meristem size and activity and, as a result, has profound effects on inflorescence development and architecture. To clarify the role of cytokinin action in inflorescence development, we used the NanoString nCounter system to analyze gene expression in the early stages of rice panicle development, focusing on 67 genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, degradation, and signaling. Results point toward key members of these gene families involved in panicle development and indicate that the expression of many genes involved in cytokinin action differs between the panicle and vegetative tissues. Dynamic patterns of gene expression suggest that subnetworks mediate cytokinin action during different stages of panicle development. The variation of expression during panicle development is greater among genes encoding proteins involved in cytokinin metabolism and negative regulators of the pathway than for the genes in the primary response pathway. These results provide insight into the expression patterns of genes involved in cytokinin action during inflorescence development in a crop of agricultural importance, with relevance to similar processes in other monocots. The identification of subnetworks of genes expressed at different stages of early panicle development suggests that manipulation of their expression could have substantial effects on inflorescence architecture.

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<![CDATA[Bacillus aryabhattai SRB02 tolerates oxidative and nitrosative stress and promotes the growth of soybean by modulating the production of phytohormones]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbf30

Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are diverse, naturally occurring bacteria that establish a close association with plant roots and promote the growth and immunity of plants. Established mechanisms involved in PGPR-mediated plant growth promotion include regulation of phytohormones, improved nutrient availability, and antagonistic effects on plant pathogens. In this study, we isolated a bacterium from the rhizospheric soil of a soybean field in Chungcheong buk-do, South Korea. Using 16S rRNA sequencing, the bacterium was identified as Bacillus aryabhattai strain SRB02. Here we show that this strain significantly promotes the growth of soybean. Gas chromatography—mass spectrometry analysis showed that SRB02 produced significant amounts of abscisic acid, indole acetic acid, cytokinin and different gibberellic acids in culture. SRB02-treated soybean plants showed significantly better heat stress tolerance than did untreated plants. These plants also produced consistent levels of ABA under heat stress and exhibited ABA-mediated stomatal closure. High levels of IAA, JA, GA12, GA4, and GA7, were recorded in SRB02-treated plants. These plants produced longer roots and shoots than those of control plants. B. aryabhattai SRB02 was found to be highly tolerant to oxidative stress induced by H2O2 and MV potentiated by high catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. SRB02 also tolerated high nitrosative stress induced by the nitric oxide donors GSNO and CysNO. Because of these attributes, B. aryabhattai SRB02 may prove to be a valuable resource for incorporation in biofertilizers and other soil amendments that seek to improve crop productivity.

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<![CDATA[Calmodulin-binding protein CBP60g functions as a negative regulator in Arabidopsis anthocyanin accumulation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db52ab0ee8fa60bdc642

Anthocyanins, a kind of flavonoid, normally accumulate in the flowers and fruits and make them colorful. Anthocyanin accumulation is regulated via the different temporal and spatial expression of anthocyanin regulatory and biosynthetic genes. CBP60g, a calmodulin binding protein, has previously been shown to have a role in pathogen resistance, drought tolerance and ABA sensitivity. In this study, we found that CBP60g repressed anthocyanin accumulation induced by drought, sucrose and kinetin. The expression pattern of CBP60g was in accordance with the anthocyanin accumulation tissues. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed that the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes CHS, CHI and DFR, as well as two members of MBW complex, PAP1, a MYB transcription factor, and TT8, a bHLH transcription factor, were down regulated by CBP60g.

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<![CDATA[The QTL GNP1 Encodes GA20ox1, Which Increases Grain Number and Yield by Increasing Cytokinin Activity in Rice Panicle Meristems]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da5dab0ee8fa60b9058c

Cytokinins and gibberellins (GAs) play antagonistic roles in regulating reproductive meristem activity. Cytokinins have positive effects on meristem activity and maintenance. During inflorescence meristem development, cytokinin biosynthesis is activated via a KNOX-mediated pathway. Increased cytokinin activity leads to higher grain number, whereas GAs negatively affect meristem activity. The GA biosynthesis genes GA20oxs are negatively regulated by KNOX proteins. KNOX proteins function as modulators, balancing cytokinin and GA activity in the meristem. However, little is known about the crosstalk among cytokinin and GA regulators together with KNOX proteins and how KNOX-mediated dynamic balancing of hormonal activity functions. Through map-based cloning of QTLs, we cloned a GA biosynthesis gene, Grain Number per Panicle1 (GNP1), which encodes rice GA20ox1. The grain number and yield of NIL-GNP1TQ were significantly higher than those of isogenic control (Lemont). Sequence variations in its promoter region increased the levels of GNP1 transcripts, which were enriched in the apical regions of inflorescence meristems in NIL-GNP1TQ. We propose that cytokinin activity increased due to a KNOX-mediated transcriptional feedback loop resulting from the higher GNP1 transcript levels, in turn leading to increased expression of the GA catabolism genes GA2oxs and reduced GA1 and GA3 accumulation. This rebalancing process increased cytokinin activity, thereby increasing grain number and grain yield in rice. These findings uncover important, novel roles of GAs in rice florescence meristem development and provide new insights into the crosstalk between cytokinin and GA underlying development process.

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<![CDATA[Comparative transcription analysis of different Antirrhinum phyllotaxy nodes identifies major signal networks involved in vegetative-reproductive transition]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be01c3

Vegetative-reproductive phase change is an indispensable event which guarantees several aspects of successful meristem behaviour and organ development. Antirrhinum majus undergoes drastic changes of shoot architecture during the phase change, including phyllotactic change and leaf type alteration from opposite decussate to spiral. However, the regulation mechanism in both of phyllotactic morphology changes is still unclear. Here, the Solexa/Illumina RNA-seq high-throughput sequencing was used to evaluate the global changes of transcriptome levels among four node regions during phyllotactic development. More than 86,315,782 high quality reads were sequenced and assembled into 58,509 unigenes. These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were classified into 118 pathways described in the KEGG database. Based on the heat-map analysis, a large number of DEGs were overwhelmingly distributed in the hormone signal pathway as well as the carbohydrate biosynthesis and metabolism. The quantitative real time (qRT)-PCR results indicated that most of DEGs were highly up-regulated in the swapping regions of phyllotactic morphology. Moreover, transcriptions factors (TFs) with high transcripts were also identified, controlling the phyllotactic morphology by the regulation of hormone and sugar-metabolism signal pathways. A number of DEGs did not align with any databases and might be novel genes involved in the phyllotactic development. These genes will serve as an invaluable genetic resource for understanding the molecular mechanism of the phyllotactic development.

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<![CDATA[OsARF16 Is Involved in Cytokinin-Mediated Inhibition of Phosphate Transport and Phosphate Signaling in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db36ab0ee8fa60bd326e

Background

Plant responses to phytohormone stimuli are the most important biological features for plants to survive in a complex environment. Cytokinin regulates growth and nutrient homeostasis, such as the phosphate (Pi) starvation response and Pi uptake in plants. However, the mechanisms underlying how cytokinin participates in Pi uptake and Pi signaling are largely unknown. In this study, we found that OsARF16 is required for the cytokinin response and is involved in the negative regulation of Pi uptake and Pi signaling by cytokinin.

Principal Findings

The mutant osarf16 showed an obvious resistance to exogenous cytokinin treatment and the expression level of the OsARF16 gene was considerably up-regulated by cytokinin. Cytokinin (6-BA) application suppressed Pi uptake and the Pi starvation response in wild-type Nipponbare (NIP) and all these responses were compromised in the osarf16 mutant. Our data showed that cytokinin inhibits the transport of Pi from the roots to the shoots and that OsARF16 is involved in this process. The Pi content in the osarf16 mutant was much higher than in NIP under 6-BA treatment. The expressions of PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 (PHT1) genes, phosphate (Pi) starvation-induced (PSI) genes and purple PAPase genes were higher in the osarf16 mutant than in NIP under cytokinin treatment.

Conclusion

Our results revealed a new biological function for OsARF16 in the cytokinin-mediated inhibition of Pi uptake and Pi signaling in rice.

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<![CDATA[The bHLH transcription factor SPATULA enables cytokinin signaling, and both activate auxin biosynthesis and transport genes at the medial domain of the gynoecium]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5aab0ee8fa60bdf251

Fruits and seeds are the major food source on earth. Both derive from the gynoecium and, therefore, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms that guide the development of this organ of angiosperm species. In Arabidopsis, the gynoecium is composed of two congenitally fused carpels, where two domains: medial and lateral, can be distinguished. The medial domain includes the carpel margin meristem (CMM) that is key for the production of the internal tissues involved in fertilization, such as septum, ovules, and transmitting tract. Interestingly, the medial domain shows a high cytokinin signaling output, in contrast to the lateral domain, where it is hardly detected. While it is known that cytokinin provides meristematic properties, understanding on the mechanisms that underlie the cytokinin signaling pattern in the young gynoecium is lacking. Moreover, in other tissues, the cytokinin pathway is often connected to the auxin pathway, but we also lack knowledge about these connections in the young gynoecium. Our results reveal that cytokinin signaling, that can provide meristematic properties required for CMM activity and growth, is enabled by the transcription factor SPATULA (SPT) in the medial domain. Meanwhile, cytokinin signaling is confined to the medial domain by the cytokinin response repressor ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE 6 (AHP6), and perhaps by ARR16 (a type-A ARR) as well, both present in the lateral domains (presumptive valves) of the developing gynoecia. Moreover, SPT and cytokinin, probably together, promote the expression of the auxin biosynthetic gene TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS 1 (TAA1) and the gene encoding the auxin efflux transporter PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3), likely creating auxin drainage important for gynoecium growth. This study provides novel insights in the spatiotemporal determination of the cytokinin signaling pattern and its connection to the auxin pathway in the young gynoecium.

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<![CDATA[Modeling hormonal control of cambium proliferation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4fab0ee8fa60bdba89

Rise of atmospheric CO2 is one of the main causes of global warming. Catastrophic climate change can be avoided by reducing emissions and increasing sequestration of CO2. Trees are known to sequester CO2 during photosynthesis, and then store it as wood biomass. Thus, breeding of trees with higher wood yield would mitigate global warming as well as augment production of renewable construction materials, energy, and industrial feedstock. Wood is made of cellulose-rich xylem cells produced through proliferation of a specialized stem cell niche called cambium. Importance of cambium in xylem cells production makes it an ideal target for the tree breeding programs; however our knowledge about control of cambium proliferation remains limited. The morphology and regulation of cambium are different from those of stem cell niches that control axial growth. For this reason, translating the knowledge about axial growth to radial growth has limited use. Furthermore, genetic approaches cannot be easily applied because overlaying tissues conceal cambium from direct observation and complicate identification of mutants. To overcome the paucity of experimental tools in cambium biology, we constructed a Boolean network CARENET (CAmbium REgulation gene NETwork) for modelling cambium activity, which includes the key transcription factors WOX4 and HD-ZIP III as well as their potential regulators. Our simulations predict that: (1) auxin, cytokinin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroids act cooperatively in promoting transcription of WOX4 and HD-ZIP III; (2) auxin and cytokinin pathways negatively regulate each other; (3) hormonal pathways act redundantly in sustaining cambium activity; (4) individual cambium cells can have diverse molecular identities. CARENET can be extended to include components of other signalling pathways and be integrated with models of xylem and phloem differentiation. Such extended models would facilitate breeding trees with higher wood yield.

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<![CDATA[Wheat Grain Yield Increase in Response to Pre-Anthesis Foliar Application of 6-Benzylaminopurine Is Dependent on Floret Development]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db29ab0ee8fa60bd0d23

Wheat yield is largely determined during the period prior to flowering, when the final numbers of fertile florets and grains per spike are established. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of floret primordia development in winter wheat in response to pre-anthesis application of a synthetic cytokinin, 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA). We conducted an experiment in which two foliar spray treatments were applied (water or 6-BA) to Chinese winter wheat at 25 days after jointing during two growing seasons (2012–2013 and 2013–2014). Both the final grain number per spike and grain yield at maturity exhibited remarkable increases in response to the 6-BA treatment. Application of 6-BA increased the number of fertile florets in basal spikelets and, to a greater extent, in central spikelets. The mechanism by which 6-BA application affected the final number of fertile florets primarily involved suppression of the floret abortion rates. Application of 6-BA considerably reduced the abortion rates of basal, central and apical spikelet florets (by as much as 77% compared with the control), as well as the degeneration rates of basal and central spikelet florets, albeit to a lesser degree. The effect of 6-BA application on the likelihood of proximal florets being set was limited to the distal florets in the whole spike, whereas obvious increases in the likelihood of grain set under 6-BA treatment were observed in distal florets, primarily in central spikelet positions. The results of this study provide important evidence that 6-BA application to florets (final fertile floret production) results in an increased grain yield.

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<![CDATA[Change in Auxin and Cytokinin Levels Coincides with Altered Expression of Branching Genes during Axillary Bud Outgrowth in Chrysanthemum]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daccab0ee8fa60bb46de

In the production and breeding of Chrysanthemum sp., shoot branching is an important quality aspect as the outgrowth of axillary buds determines the final plant shape. Bud outgrowth is mainly controlled by apical dominance and the crosstalk between the plant hormones auxin, cytokinin and strigolactone. In this work the hormonal and genetic regulation of axillary bud outgrowth was studied in two differently branching cut flower Chrysanthemum morifolium (Ramat) genotypes. C17 is a split-type which forms an inflorescence meristem after a certain vegetative period, while C18 remains vegetative under long day conditions. Plant growth of both genotypes was monitored during 5 subsequent weeks starting one week before flower initiation occurred in C17. Axillary bud outgrowth was measured weekly and samples of shoot apex, stem and axillary buds were taken during the first two weeks. We combined auxin and cytokinin measurements by UPLC-MS/MS with RT-qPCR expression analysis of genes involved in shoot branching regulation pathways in chrysanthemum. These included bud development genes (CmBRC1, CmDRM1, CmSTM, CmLsL), auxin pathway genes (CmPIN1, CmTIR3, CmTIR1, CmAXR1, CmAXR6, CmAXR2, CmIAA16, CmIAA12), cytokinin pathway genes (CmIPT3, CmHK3, CmRR1) and strigolactone genes (CmMAX1 and CmMAX2). Genotype C17 showed a release from apical dominance after floral transition coinciding with decreased auxin and increased cytokinin levels in the subapical axillary buds. As opposed to C17, C18 maintained strong apical dominance with vegetative growth throughout the experiment. Here high auxin levels and decreasing cytokinin levels in axillary buds and stem were measured. A differential expression of several branching genes accompanied the different hormonal change and bud outgrowth in C17 and C18. This was clear for the strigolactone biosynthesis gene CmMAX1, the transcription factor CmBRC1 and the dormancy associated gene CmDRM1, that all showed a decreased expression in C17 at floral transition and an increased expression in C18 with continuous vegetative growth. These results offer a case study for Chrysanthemum, showing an altered cytokinin to auxin balance and differential gene expression between vegetative growth with apical dominance and transition to generative growth with loss of apical dominance and axillary bud outgrowth. This suggests a conservation of several aspects of the hormonal and genetical regulation of bud outgrowth in Chrysanthemum. Furthermore, 15 previously uncharacterised genes in chrysanthemum, were described in this study. Of those genes involved in axillary bud outgrowth we identified CmDRM1, CmBRC1 and CmMAX1 as having an altered expression preceding axillary bud outgrowth, which could be useful as markers for bud activity.

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<![CDATA[The Plant Hormone Cytokinin Confers Protection against Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da16ab0ee8fa60b7b398

Modulating key dynamics of plant growth and development, the effects of the plant hormone cytokinin on animal cells gained much attention recently. Most previous studies on cytokinin effects on mammalian cells have been conducted with elevated cytokinin concentration (in the μM range). However, to examine physiologically relevant dose effects of cytokinins on animal cells, we systematically analyzed the impact of kinetin in cultured cells at low and high concentrations (1nM-10μM) and examined cytotoxic and genotoxic conditions. We furthermore measured the intrinsic antioxidant activity of kinetin in a cell-free system using the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay and in cells using the dihydroethidium staining method. Monitoring viability, we looked at kinetin effects in mammalian cells such as HL60 cells, HaCaT human keratinocyte cells, NRK rat epithelial kidney cells and human peripheral lymphocytes. Kinetin manifests no antioxidant activity in the cell free system and high doses of kinetin (500 nM and higher) reduce cell viability and mediate DNA damage in vitro. In contrast, low doses (concentrations up to 100 nM) of kinetin confer protection in cells against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results show that pretreatment of the cells with kinetin significantly reduces 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide mediated reactive oxygen species production. Also, pretreatment with kinetin retains cellular GSH levels when they are also treated with the GSH-depleting agent patulin. Our results explicitly show that low kinetin doses reduce apoptosis and protect cells from oxidative stress mediated cell death. Future studies on the interaction between cytokinins and human cellular pathway targets will be intriguing.

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<![CDATA[Transcriptomic profiling of taproot growth and sucrose accumulation in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) at different developmental stages]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db52ab0ee8fa60bdc614

In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), taproot weight and sucrose content are the important determinants of yield and quality. However, high yield and low sucrose content are two tightly bound agronomic traits. The advances in next-generation sequencing technology and the publication of sugar beet genome have provided a method for the study of molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of these two agronomic traits. In this work, we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses in the high taproot yield cultivar SD13829 and the high sucrose content cultivar BS02 at five developmental stages. More than 50,000,000 pair-end clean reads for each library were generated. When taproot turned into the rapid growth stage at the growth stage of 82 days after emergence (DAE), eighteen enriched gene ontology (GO) terms, including cell wall, cytoskeleton, and enzyme linked receptor protein signaling pathway, occurred in both cultivars. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of paired comparison in both cultivars were enriched in the cell wall GO term. For pathway enrichment analyses of DEGs that were respectively generated at 82 DAE compared to 59 DAE (the earlier developmental stage before taproot turning into the rapid growth stage), plant hormone signal transduction pathway was enriched. At 82 DAE, the rapid enlarging stage of taproot, several transcription factor family members were up-regulated in both cultivars. An antagonistic expression of brassinosteroid- and auxin-related genes was also detected. In SD13829, the growth strategy was relatively focused on cell enlargement promoted by brassinosteroid signaling, whereas in BS02, it was relatively focused on secondarily cambial cell division regulated by cytokinin, auxin and brassinosteroid signaling. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the weight and sucrose content of taproot rely on its growth strategy, which is controlled by brassinosteroid, auxin, cytokinin, and gibberellin.

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<![CDATA[Grain Filling Characteristics and Their Relations with Endogenous Hormones in Large- and Small-Grain Mutants of Rice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9efab0ee8fa60b6dca4

This study determined if the variation in grain filling parameters between two different spikelet types of rice (Oryza sativa L.) is regulated by the hormonal levels in the grains. Two rice mutants, namely, a large-grain mutant (AZU-M) and a small-grain mutant (ZF802-M), and their respective wild types (AZU-WT and ZF802-WT) were grown in the field. The endosperm cell division rate, filling rate, and hormonal levels: zeatin + zeatin riboside (Z+ZR), indo-3-acetic acid (IAA), polyamines (PAs), and abscisic acid (ABA) were determined. The results showed that there was no significant difference between the filling and endosperm cell division rates. These rates were synchronous between the superior and inferior spikelets for both mutants. However, the abovementioned parameters were significantly different between the two spikelet types for the two wild types. The superior spikelets filled faster and their filling rate was higher compared to the inferior ones. Changes in the concentrations of plant hormones were consistent with the observed endosperm cell division rate and the filling rate for both types of spikelets of mutant and wild type plants. Regression analysis showed a significant positive correlation between cell division and filling rates with the concentrations of the investigated hormones. Exogenous chemical application verified the role of ABA, IAA, and PAs in grain filling. The results indicate that poor filling of inferior spikelets in rice occurs primarily due to the reduced hormone concentrations therein, leading to lower division rate of endosperm cells, fewer endosperm cells, slower filling rate, and smaller grain weight.

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<![CDATA[Exogenous Cytokinins Increase Grain Yield of Winter Wheat Cultivars by Improving Stay-Green Characteristics under Heat Stress]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da33ab0ee8fa60b854bc

Stay-green, a key trait of wheat, can not only increase the yield of wheat but also its resistance to heat stress during active photosynthesis. Cytokinins are the most potent general coordinator between the stay-green trait and senescence. The objectives of the present study were to identify and assess the effects of cytokinins on the photosynthetic organ and heat resistance in wheat. Two winter wheat cultivars, Wennong 6 (a stay-green cultivar) and Jimai 20 (a control cultivar), were subjected to heat stress treatment from 1 to 5 days after anthesis (DAA). The two cultivars were sprayed daily with 10 mg L-1 of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) between 1 and 3 DAA under ambient and elevated temperature conditions. We found that the heat stress significantly decreased the number of kernels per spike and the grain yield (P < 0.05). Heat stress also decreased the zeatin riboside (ZR) content, but increased the gibberellin (GA3), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and abscisic acid (ABA) contents at 3 to 15 DAA. Application of 6-BA significantly (P < 0.05) increased the grain-filling rate, endosperm cell division rate, endosperm cell number, and 1,000-grain weight under heated condition. 6-BA application increased ZR and IAA contents at 3 to 28 DAA, but decreased GA3 and ABA contents. The contents of ZR, ABA, and IAA in kernels were positively and significantly correlated with the grain-filling rate (P < 0.05), whereas GA3 was counter-productive at 3 to 15 DAA. These results suggest that the decrease in grain yield under heat stress was due to a lower ZR content and a higher GA3 content compared to that at elevated temperature during the early development of the kernels, which resulted in less kernel number and lower grain-filling rate. The results also provide essential information for further utilization of the cytokinin substances in the cultivation of heat-resistant wheat.

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<![CDATA[Overexpression of the WOX gene STENOFOLIA improves biomass yield and sugar release in transgenic grasses and display altered cytokinin homeostasis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db54ab0ee8fa60bdd118

Lignocellulosic biomass can be a significant source of renewable clean energy with continued improvement in biomass yield and bioconversion strategies. In higher plants, the leaf blade is the central energy convertor where solar energy and CO2 are assimilated to make the building blocks for biomass production. Here we report that introducing the leaf blade development regulator STENOFOLIA (STF), a WOX family transcription factor, into the biofuel crop switchgrass, significantly improves both biomass yield and sugar release. We found that STF overexpressing switchgrass plants produced approximately 2-fold more dry biomass and release approximately 1.8-fold more solubilized sugars without pretreatment compared to controls. The biomass increase was attributed mainly to increased leaf width and stem thickness, which was also consistent in STF transgenic rice and Brachypodium, and appeared to be caused by enhanced cell proliferation. STF directly binds to multiple regions in the promoters of some cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX) genes and represses their expression in all three transgenic grasses. This repression was accompanied by a significant increase in active cytokinin content in transgenic rice leaves, suggesting that the increase in biomass productivity and sugar release could at least in part be associated with improved cytokinin levels caused by repression of cytokinin degrading enzymes. Our study provides a new tool for improving biomass feedstock yield in bioenergy crops, and uncovers a novel mechanistic insight in the function of STF, which may also apply to other repressive WOX genes that are master regulators of several key plant developmental programs.

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<![CDATA[Effects of Cytokinin and Nitrogen on Drought Tolerance of Creeping Bentgrass]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da80ab0ee8fa60b9a44a

Cytokinin (CK) is a vital plant hormone that controls many aspects of growth and development in plants. Nitrogen (N) is the indispensable macronutrient needed in plants and also one of the most important limiting factors for plant growth. This study was designed to investigate the simultaneous effects of CK and N on the visual turf quality and antioxidant metabolism of drought-stressed creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.). ‘PennA-4’ creeping bentgrass treated with trans-zeatin riboside at three rates of CK concentrations of 0, 10 and 100 μM (designated by CK0, 10, and 100) and two nitrogen rates with 2.5 and 7.5 kg N·ha-1 every 15 days (designated by low and high N) in a complete factorial arrangement was grown under two soil moisture regimes: well-watered and drought stress. Exogenous CK improved turf quality and delayed leaf wilting under drought stress, especially under high N. The grasses treated with CK10 and CK100 had lower O2- production and H2O2 concentration than those without CK treatment. The CK100 treatment enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD) by 25%, 22%, 17% and 24%, respectively, relative to CK0. Moreover, the activity changes of the antioxidant enzyme isoforms were more significant under high N condition relative to low N condition. Our results demonstrated the beneficial impacts of CK and N on physiological reactions, especially antioxidant metabolism, and foliar application of CK at 10 or 100 μM plus 7.5 kg ha-1 N biweekly may improve drought stress resistance of creeping bentgrass.

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