ResearchPad - diastole https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Retrospectively ECG-gated helical vs. non-ECG-synchronized high-pitch CTA of the aortic root for TAVI planning]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13825 Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) plays a key role in patient assessment prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). However, to date no consensus has been established on what is the optimal pre-procedural imaging protocol. Variability in pre-TAVI acquisition protocols may lead to discrepancies in aortic annulus measurements and may potentially influence prosthesis size selection.PurposeThe current study evaluates the magnitude of differences in aortic annulus measurements using max-systolic, end-diastolic, and non-ECG-synchronized imaging, as well as the impact of method on prosthesis size selection.Material and methodsFifty consecutive TAVI-candidates, who underwent retrospectively-ECG-gated CT angiography (CTA) of the aortic root, directly followed by non-ECG-synchronized high-pitch CT of the entire aorta, were retrospectively included. Aortic root dimensions were assessed at each 10% increment of the R-R interval (0–100%) and on the non-ECG-synchronized scan. Dimensional changes within the cardiac cycle were evaluated using a 1-way repeated ANOVA. Agreement in measurements between max-systole, end-diastole and non-ECG-synchronized scans was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis.ResultsMaximal dimensions of the aortic root structures and minimum annulus-coronary ostia distances were measured during systole. Max-systolic measurements were significantly and substantially larger than end-diastolic (p<0.001) and non-ECG-synchronized measurements (p<0.001). Due to these discrepancies, the three methods resulted in the same prosthesis size selection in only 48–62% of patients.ConclusionsThe systematic differences between max-systolic, end-diastolic and non-ECG-synchronized measurements for relevant aortic annular dimensions are both statistically significant and clinically relevant. Imaging strategy impacts prosthesis size selection in nearly half the TAVI-candidates. End-diastolic and non-ECG-synchronized imaging does not provide optimal information for prosthesis size selection. Systolic image acquisition is necessary for assessment of maximal annular dimensions and minimum annulus-coronary ostia distances. ]]> <![CDATA[Right ventricular pressure overload directly affects left ventricular torsion mechanics in patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_8470 This study examined the impact of septal flattening on left ventricular (LV) torsion in patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH). Fifty-two patients with proven precapillary PH and 13 healthy controls were included. Ventricular function was assessed including 4D-measurements, tissue velocity imaging, and speckle tracking analysis. Increased eccentricity index (1.39 vs. 1.08, p<0.001), systolic pulmonary artery pressure (64 vs. 29mmHg, p<0.001) and right ventricular Tei index (0.55 vs. 0.28, p = 0.007), and reduced tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (19.0 vs. 26.5mm, p<0.001) were detected in PH patients as compared to controls. With increasing eccentricity of left ventricle, LV torsion was both decreased and delayed. Torsion rate paralleled this pattern of change during systole, but not during diastole. In conclusion, right ventricular pressure overload directly affects LV torsion mechanics. The echocardiographic methodology applied provides novel insights in the interrelation of right- and left ventricular function.

]]>
<![CDATA[Three-Directional Evaluation of Mitral Flow in the Rat Heart by Phase-Contrast Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da27ab0ee8fa60b812c5

Purpose

Determination of mitral flow is an important aspect in assessment of cardiac function. Traditionally, mitral flow is measured by Doppler echocardiography which suffers from several challenges, particularly related to the direction and the spatial inhomogeneity of flow. These challenges are especially prominent in rodents. The purpose of this study was to establish a cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) protocol for evaluation of three-directional mitral flow in a rodent model of cardiac disease.

Materials and Methods

Three-directional mitral flow were evaluated by phase contrast CMR (PC-CMR) in rats with aortic banding (AB) (N = 7) and sham-operated controls (N = 7). Peak mitral flow and deceleration rate from PC-CMR was compared to conventional Doppler echocardiography. The accuracy of PC-CMR was investigated by comparison of spatiotemporally integrated mitral flow with left ventricular stroke volume assessed by cine CMR.

Results

PC-CMR portrayed the spatial distribution of mitral flow and flow direction in the atrioventricular plane throughout diastole. Both PC-CMR and echocardiography demonstrated increased peak mitral flow velocity and higher deceleration rate in AB compared to sham. Comparison with cine CMR revealed that PC-CMR measured mitral flow with excellent accuracy. Echocardiography presented significantly lower values of flow compared to PC-CMR.

Conclusions

For the first time, we show that PC-CMR offers accurate evaluation of three-directional mitral blood flow in rodents. The method successfully detects alterations in the mitral flow pattern in response to cardiac disease and provides novel insight into the characteristics of mitral flow.

]]>
<![CDATA[Quantification of left coronary bifurcation angles and plaques by coronary computed tomography angiography for prediction of significant coronary stenosis: A preliminary study with dual-source CT]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db52ab0ee8fa60bdc966

Purpose

To evaluate the diagnostic performance of left coronary bifurcation angles and plaque characteristics for prediction of coronary stenosis by dual-source CT.

Methods

106 patients suspected of coronary artery disease undergoing both coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and invasive coronary angiography (CAG) within three months were included. Left coronary bifurcation angles including the angles between the left anterior descending artery and left circumflex artery (LAD-LCx), left main coronary artery and left anterior descending artery (LM-LAD), left main coronary artery and left circumflex artery (LM-LCx) were measured on CT images. CCTA plaque parameters were calculated by plaque analysis software. Coronary stenosis ≥ 50% by CAG was defined as significant.

Results

106 patients with 318 left coronary bifurcation angles and 126 vessels were analyzed. The bifurcation angle of LAD-LCx was significantly larger in left coronary stenosis ≥ 50% than stenosis < 50%, and significantly wider in the non-calcified plaque group than calcified. Multivariable analyses showed the bifurcation angle of LAD-LCx was an independent predictor for significant left coronary stenosis (OR = 1.423, P = 0.002). In ROC curve analysis, LAD-LCx predicted significant left coronary stenosis with a sensitivity of 66.7%, specificity of 78.4%, positive predictive value of 85.2% and negative predictive value of 55.8%. The lipid plaque volume improved the diagnostic performance of CCTA diameter stenosis (AUC: 0.854 vs. 0.900, P = 0.045) in significant coronary stenosis.

Conclusions

The bifurcation angle of LAD-LCx could predict significant left coronary stenosis. Wider LAD-LCx is related to non-calcified lesions. Lipid plaque volume could improve the diagnostic performance of CCTA for coronary stenosis prediction.

]]>
<![CDATA[Impact of Gout on Left Atrial Function: A Prospective Speckle-Tracking Echocardiographic Study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e1ab0ee8fa60b69c90

The purpose of our study was to evaluate the left ventricular (LV) and left atrial (LA) function in patients with gout. A total of 173 patients underwent a comprehensive Doppler-echocardiography examination. Participants were divided into four groups–Stage 0: control (n = 35), Stage I: asymptomatic hyperuricemia (n = 30), Stage II: gouty arthritis without tophi (n = 58), and Stage III: tophaceous gout (n = 50). Serum uric acid levels were not significantly different between stage I, II and III. Stage III patients demonstrated a higher ratio of the transmitral and myocardial peak early diastolic velocities (E/Em) (10.50±3.18 vs. 8.58±2.07; P = 0.008), and larger maximal LA volume index (LAVi) (29.60±9.89 vs. 20.07±4.76 ml/m2; P<0.001) compared with controls. Stage III patients had decreased LV global longitudinal systolic strain (LVε) compared with controls (−20.2±3.06 vs. −21.79±2.27; P = 0.002). Stage III patients also had decreased peak atrial longitudinal strain rate during ventricular systole (ALSRsyst), peak atrial longitudinal strain rate during ventricular early diastole (ALSRearly), and peak atrial longitudinal strain rate during ventricular late diastole (ALSRlate) compared with controls (1.73±0.48 vs. 2.05±0.55 1/s, −1.44±0.53 vs. −2.07±0.84 1/s, −2.07±0.7 vs. −2.66±0.91 1/s, respectively; all P<0.005). Multiple regression analysis revealed severity of gout had an independent negative impact on LA pump function (ALSRlate). In conclusion, gout caused LV diastolic dysfunction, LV subclinical systolic dysfunction and LA reservoir, conduit, and booster pump dysfunction.

]]>
<![CDATA[Myocardial Fibrosis Induced by Exposure to Subclinical Lipopolysaccharide Is Associated with Decreased miR-29c and Enhanced NOX2 Expression in Mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e8ab0ee8fa60b6bfdc

Background

Exposure to subclinical levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) occurs commonly and is seemingly well tolerated. However, recurrent LPS exposure induces cardiac fibrosis over 2 to 3 months in a murine model, not mediated by the renin-angiotensin system. Subclinical LPS induces cardiac fibrosis by unique mechanisms.

Methods

In C57/Bl6 mice, LPS (10 mg/kg) or saline (control) were injected intraperitoneally once a week for 1–4 weeks. Mice showed no signs of distress, change in activity, appetite, or weight loss. Mice were euthanized after 3 days, 1, 2, or 4 weeks to measure cardiac expression of fibrosis-related genes and potential mediators (measured by QRT-PCR), including micro-RNA (miR) and NADPH oxidase (NOX). Collagen fraction area of the left ventricle was measured with picrosirius red staining. Cardiac fibroblasts isolated from adult mouse hearts were incubated with 0, 0.1, 1.0 or 10 ng/ml LPS for 48 hours.

Results

Cardiac miR expression profiling demonstrated decreased miR-29c after 3 and 7 days following LPS, which were confirmed by QRT-PCR. The earliest changes in fibrosis-related genes and mediators that occurred 3 days after LPS were increased cardiac expression of TIMP-1 and NOX-2 (but not of NOX-4). This persisted at 1 and 2 weeks, with additional increases in collagen Iα1, collagen IIIα1, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1, TIMP2, and periostin. There was no change in TGF-β or connective tissue growth factor. Collagen fraction area of the left ventricle increased after 2 and 4 weeks of LPS. LPS decreased miR-29c and increased NOX-2 in isolated cardiac fibroblasts.

Conclusions

Recurrent exposure to subclinical LPS induces cardiac fibrosis after 2–4 weeks. Early changes 3 days after LPS were decreased miR-29c and increased NOX2 and TIMP1, which persisted at 1 and 2 weeks, along with widespread activation of fibrosis-related genes. Decreased miR-29c and increased NOX2, which induce cardiac fibrosis in other conditions, may uniquely mediate LPS-induced cardiac fibrosis.

]]>
<![CDATA[Quantification of Left Ventricular Torsion and Diastolic Recoil Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Myocardial Feature Tracking]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da91ab0ee8fa60ba04fe

Objectives

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance feature tracking (CMR-FT) offers quantification of myocardial deformation from routine cine images. However, data using CMR-FT to quantify left ventricular (LV) torsion and diastolic recoil are not yet available. We therefore sought to evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of CMR-FT to quantify LV torsion and peak recoil rate using an optimal anatomical approach.

Methods

Short-axis cine stacks were acquired at rest and during dobutamine stimulation (10 and 20 µg·kg−1·min−1) in 10 healthy volunteers. Rotational displacement was analysed for all slices. A complete 3D-LV rotational model was developed using linear interpolation between adjacent slices. Torsion was defined as the difference between apical and basal rotation, divided by slice distance. Depending on the distance between the most apical (defined as 0% LV distance) and basal (defined as 100% LV distance) slices, four different models for the calculation of torsion were examined: Model-1 (25–75%), Model-2 (0–100%), Model-3 (25–100%) and Model-4 (0–75%). Analysis included subendocardial, subepicardial and global torsion and recoil rate (mean of subendocardial and subepicardial values).

Results

Quantification of torsion and recoil rate was feasible in all subjects. There was no significant difference between the different models at rest. However, only Model-1 (25–75%) discriminated between rest and stress (Global Torsion: 2.7±1.5°cm−1, 3.6±2.0°cm−1, 5.1±2.2°cm−1, p<0.01; Global Recoil Rate: −30.1±11.1°cm−1s−1,−46.9±15.0°cm−1s−1,−68.9±32.3°cm−1s−1, p<0.01; for rest, 10 and 20 µg·kg−1·min−1 of dobutamine, respectively). Reproducibility was sufficient for all parameters as determined by Bland-Altman analysis, intraclass correlation coefficients and coefficient of variation.

Conclusions

CMR-FT based derivation of myocardial torsion and recoil rate is feasible and reproducible at rest and with dobutamine stress. Using an optimal anatomical approach measuring rotation at 25% and 75% apical and basal LV locations allows effective quantification of torsion and recoil dynamics. Application of these new measures of deformation by CMR-FT should next be explored in disease states.

]]>
<![CDATA[Beta-Adrenoceptor Stimulation Reveals Ca2+ Waves and Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Depletion in Left Ventricular Cardiomyocytes from Post-Infarction Rats with and without Heart Failure]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da7eab0ee8fa60b99a7a

Abnormal cellular Ca2+ handling contributes to both contractile dysfunction and arrhythmias in heart failure. Reduced Ca2+ transient amplitude due to decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content is a common finding in heart failure models. However, heart failure models also show increased propensity for diastolic Ca2+ release events which occur when sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content exceeds a certain threshold level. Such Ca2+ release events can initiate arrhythmias. In this study we aimed to investigate if both of these aspects of altered Ca2+ homeostasis could be found in left ventricular cardiomyocytes from rats with different states of cardiac function six weeks after myocardial infarction when compared to sham-operated controls. Video edge-detection, whole-cell Ca2+ imaging and confocal line-scan imaging were used to investigate cardiomyocyte contractile properties, Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ waves. In baseline conditions, i.e. without beta-adrenoceptor stimulation, cardiomyocytes from rats with large myocardial infarction, but without heart failure, did not differ from sham-operated animals in any of these aspects of cellular function. However, when exposed to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation, cardiomyocytes from both non-failing and failing rat hearts showed decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content, decreased Ca2+ transient amplitude, and increased frequency of Ca2+ waves. These results are in line with a decreased threshold for diastolic Ca2+ release established by other studies. In the present study, factors that might contribute to a lower threshold for diastolic Ca2+ release were increased THR286 phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and increased protein phosphatase 1 abundance. In conclusion, this study demonstrates both decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content and increased propensity for diastolic Ca2+ release events in ventricular cardiomyocytes from rats with heart failure after myocardial infarction, and that these phenomena are also found in rats with large myocardial infarctions without heart failure development. Importantly, beta-adrenoceptor stimulation is necessary to reveal these perturbations in Ca2+ handling after a myocardial infarction.

]]>
<![CDATA[The Prevalence and Prognosis of Resistant Hypertension in Patients with Heart Failure]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db3dab0ee8fa60bd57aa

Background

Resistant hypertension is associated with adverse clinical outcome in hypertensive patients. However, the prognostic significance of resistant hypertension in patients with heart failure remains uncertain.

Methods and Results

The 1 year survival and heart failure re-hospitalization rate of 1288 consecutive patients admitted to a university hospital for either newly diagnosed heart failure or an exacerbation of prior chronic heart failure was analyzed. Resistant hypertension was defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (>140/90 mmHg) despite being compliant with an antihypertensive regimen that includes 3 or more drugs (including a diuretic). A total of 176 (13.7%) heart failure patients had resistant hypertension. There was no difference in all cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and heart failure related re-hospitalization between patients with versus without resistant hypertension. Diabetes [hazard ratio = 1.62, 95% confidence interval = 1.13–2.34; P = 0.010] and serum sodium >139 mmol/L (hazard ratio = 1.54, 95% confidence interval = 1.06–2.23; P = 0.024) were independently associated with resistant hypertension. Patients with resistant hypertension had a relatively higher survival rate (86.9% vs. 83.8%), although the difference was not significant (log-rank x2 = 1.00, P = 0.317). In patients with reduced ejection fraction, heart failure related re-hospitalization was significantly lower in patients with resistant hypertension (45.8% vs. 59.1%, P = 0.050).

Conclusions

Resistant hypertension appears to be not associated with adverse clinical outcome in patients with heart failure, in fact may be a protective factor for reduced heart failure related re-hospitalization in patients with reduced ejection fraction.

]]>
<![CDATA[Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9eaab0ee8fa60b6c4e8

In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations’ outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results.

]]>
<![CDATA[In vivo efficacy of the AKT inhibitor ARQ 092 in Noonan Syndrome with multiple lentigines-associated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be031e

Noonan Syndrome with Multiple Lentigines (NSML, formerly LEOPARD syndrome) is an autosomal dominant "RASopathy" disorder manifesting in congenital heart disease. Most cases of NSML are caused by catalytically inactivating mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP), non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11), encoding the SH2 domain-containing PTP-2 (SHP2) protein. We previously generated knock-in mice harboring the PTPN11 mutation Y279C, one of the most common NSML alleles; these now-termed SHP2Y279C/+ mice recapitulate the human disorder and develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) by 12 weeks of age. Functionally, heart and/or cardiomyocyte lysates from SHP2Y279C/+ mice exhibit increased basal and agonist-induced AKT and mTOR activities. Here, we sought to determine whether we could reverse the hypertrophy in SHP2Y279C/+ mice using ARQ 092, an oral and selective allosteric AKT inhibitor currently in clinical trials for patients with PI3K/AKT-driven tumors or Proteus syndrome. We obtained echocardiographs of SHP2Y279C/+ and wildtype (SHP2+/+) littermates, either in the presence or absence of ARQ 092 at 12, 14, and 16 weeks of age. While SHP2Y279C/+ mice developed significant left ventricular hypertrophy by 12 weeks, as indicated by decreased chamber dimension and increased posterior wall thickness, treatment of SHP2Y279C/+ mice with ARQ 092 normalized the hypertrophy in as early as 2 weeks following treatment, with hearts comparable in size to those in wildtype (SHP2+/+) mice. In addition, we observed an increase in fractional shortening (FS%) in SHP2Y279C/+ mice, an effect of increased compensatory hypertrophy, which was not apparent in SHP2Y279C/+ mice treated with ARQ 092, suggesting functional improvement of HCM upon treatment with the AKT inhibitor. Finally, we found that ARQ 092 specifically inhibited AKT activity, as well as its downstream effectors, PRAS and S6RP in NSML mice. Taken together, these data suggest ARQ 092 may be a promising novel therapy for treatment of hypertrophy in NSML patients.

]]>
<![CDATA[Prevalence and Associated Factors of Hypertension among Adults in Durame Town, Southern Ethiopia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dacfab0ee8fa60bb596f

Background

To date, non-communicable diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, are becoming severe public health challenges particularly in developing countries. Hypertension is a modifiable risk factor that contributes the leading role for mortality. The problem is significant in low- and middle-income countries like sub-Saharan Africa. However, there are limited studies in developing countries, particularly in Ethiopia. Hence, determining the magnitude of hypertension and identifying risk groups are important.

Methods

A community based cross sectional study was conducted in April 2013 among adults (age>31 years) old. A systematic sampling technique was used to select a total of 518 study participants. Data were collected after full verbal informed consent was obtained from each participant. Multivariable logistic regressions were fitted to control the effect of confounding. Adjusted Odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated to measure associations. Variables having P-value <0.05 were considered as significant.

Results

The overall prevalence of hypertension in Durame town was 22.4% (95% CI: 18.8–26.0). Nearly 40% of hypertensive patients were newly screened. Male sex [AOR  = 2.03, 95% CI; 1.05–3.93], age [AOR  = 29.49, 95% CI; 10.60–81.27], salt use [AOR  = 6.55, 95% CI; 2.31–18.53], eating vegetable three or fewer days per week [AOR  = 2.3,95% CI; 1.17–4.51], not continuously walking at least for 10 minutes per day [AOR  = 7.82, 95% CI; 2.37–25.82], having family history of hypertension [AOR  = 2.46, 95%CI; 1.31–4.61] and being overweight/obese [AOR  = 15.7, 95% CI 7.89–31.21)] were found to be risk factors for hypertension.

Conclusions

The prevalence of hypertension is found to be high. Older age, male sex, having family history of hypertension, physical inactivity, poor vegetable diet, additional salt consumption and obesity were important risk factors associated with hypertension among adults. Community level intervention measures with a particular emphasis on prevention by introducing lifestyle modifications are recommended.

]]>
<![CDATA[Patient-Specific MRI-Based Right Ventricle Models Using Different Zero-Load Diastole and Systole Geometries for Better Cardiac Stress and Strain Calculations and Pulmonary Valve Replacement Surgical Outcome Predictions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daf5ab0ee8fa60bc2c34

Background

Accurate calculation of ventricular stress and strain is critical for cardiovascular investigations. Sarcomere shortening in active contraction leads to change of ventricular zero-stress configurations during the cardiac cycle. A new model using different zero-load diastole and systole geometries was introduced to provide more accurate cardiac stress/strain calculations with potential to predict post pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) surgical outcome.

Methods

Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) data were obtained from 16 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot prior to and 6 months after pulmonary valve replacement (8 male, 8 female, mean age 34.5 years). Patients were divided into Group 1 (n = 8) with better post PVR outcome and Group 2 (n = 8) with worse post PVR outcome based on their change in RV ejection fraction (EF). CMR-based patient-specific computational RV/LV models using one zero-load geometry (1G model) and two zero-load geometries (diastole and systole, 2G model) were constructed and RV wall thickness, volume, circumferential and longitudinal curvatures, mechanical stress and strain were obtained for analysis. Pairwise T-test and Linear Mixed Effect (LME) model were used to determine if the differences from the 1G and 2G models were statistically significant, with the dependence of the pair-wise observations and the patient-slice clustering effects being taken into consideration. For group comparisons, continuous variables (RV volumes, WT, C- and L- curvatures, and stress and strain values) were summarized as mean ± SD and compared between the outcome groups by using an unpaired Student t-test. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify potential morphological and mechanical predictors for post PVR surgical outcome.

Results

Based on results from the 16 patients, mean begin-ejection stress and strain from the 2G model were 28% and 40% higher than that from the 1G model, respectively. Using the 2G model results, RV EF changes correlated negatively with stress (r = -0.609, P = 0.012) and with pre-PVR RV end-diastole volume (r = -0.60, P = 0.015), but did not correlate with WT, C-curvature, L-curvature, or strain. At begin-ejection, mean RV stress of Group 2 was 57.4% higher than that of Group 1 (130.1±60.7 vs. 82.7±38.8 kPa, P = 0.0042). Stress was the only parameter that showed significant differences between the two groups. The combination of circumferential curvature, RV volume and the difference between begin-ejection stress and end-ejection stress was the best predictor for post PVR outcome with an area under the ROC curve of 0.855. The begin-ejection stress was the best single predictor among the 8 individual parameters with an area under the ROC curve of 0.782.

Conclusion

The new 2G model may be able to provide more accurate ventricular stress and strain calculations for potential clinical applications. Combining morphological and mechanical parameters may provide better predictions for post PVR outcome.

]]>