ResearchPad - digestive-enzymes https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Ontogenetic changes in energetic reserves, digestive enzymes, amino acid and energy content of <i>Lithodes santolla</i> (Anomura: Lithodidae): Baseline for culture]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14500 The southern king crab (SKC) Lithodes santolla is an important commercial species in southern South America. Fishing pressure has caused the deterioration of its stocks. Currently, culture techniques are being developed for producing SKC juveniles to enhance the natural population and to recover the fishing stock. Therefore, it is necessary to know about physiology, energetic and nutritional requirements for SKC maintenance in hatchery. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the biochemical and physiological changes in the midgut gland, muscle and hemolymph of juveniles, pre-adults and adults of wild SKC. The energetic reserves, digestive enzymes activity, amino acid profile and energy were quantified in twelve juveniles, ten pre-adult, and ten adult crabs. Juveniles showed high glycogen and low lipids in the midgut gland, and low proteins and low lactate in muscle. In the hemolymph, juveniles had high lipids. Pre-adults had high glycogen and lipids in the midgut gland, and both high protein and lactate in muscle. In the hemolymph, pre-adults had high lipids. Adults had low glycogen and high lipids in midgut gland, and both high proteins and high lactate in muscle. In hemolymph, adults had high glucose and lactate. Juveniles and pre-adults had high proteinase activity, whereas adults had high lipase activity. Major essential amino acids of SKC were arginine, methionine, and tryptophan, and the non-essential amino acids were glycine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid. On another hand, SKC had similar energy in the midgut gland and muscle, regardless of the ontogenetic stage. Moreover, we demonstrated that the biochemical energy calculation underestimates the actual measured values by a calorimeter. Thus, our results help to understand the physiological changes, energetic and nutritional requirements of L. santolla, and this study is a baseline for research on diet formulation for maintaining this species under culture conditions.

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<![CDATA[Nutritional intake of Aplanochytrium (Labyrinthulea, Stramenopiles) from living diatoms revealed by culture experiments suggesting the new prey–predator interactions in the grazing food web of the marine ecosystem]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c3fa552d5eed0c484ca3048

Labyrinthuleans (Labyrinthulea, Stramenopiles) are recognized as decomposers in marine ecosystems but their nutrient sources are not fully understood. We conducted two-membered culture experiments with labyrinthuleans and diatoms to discover where labyrinthuleans obtain their nutrients from. The results showed that Aplanochytrium strains obtained nutrients by consuming living diatoms. Aplanochytrium cells did not release digestive enzymes into the medium, but adhered to diatom cells via the tip of their characteristic ectoplasmic net system to obtain nutrients from them. The chloroplast and cell contents of the diatoms shrank and were absorbed, and then the number of Aplanochytrium cells rapidly increased as multiple aplanospores were released. To estimate the effect of labyrinthulean organisms including Aplanochytrium on marine ecosystem, we explored the dataset generated by the Tara Oceans Project from a wide range of oceanic regions. The average proportion of all labyrinthulean sequences to diatom sequences at each station was about 10%, and labyrinthulids, oblongichytrids, and aplanochytrids were the major constituent genera, accounting for more than 80% of labyrinthuleans. Therefore, these groups are suggested to greatly affect the marine ecosystem. There were positive correlations between aplanochytrids and phototrophs, green algae, and diatoms. At many stations, relatively large proportions of aplanochytrid sequences were detected in the size fraction larger than their cell size. This implied that Aplanochytrium cells increased their particle size by adhering to each other and forming aggregates with diatoms that are captured by larger zooplankton in the environment, thereby bypassing the food web pathway via aplanochytrids to higher predators. The intake of nutrients from diatoms by aplanochytrids represents a newly recognized pathway in the grazing food chain in the marine ecosystem.

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<![CDATA[Open Tubular Lab-On-Column/Mass Spectrometry for Targeted Proteomics of Nanogram Sample Amounts]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da22ab0ee8fa60b7f6f6

A novel open tubular nanoproteomic platform featuring accelerated on-line protein digestion and high-resolution nano liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has been developed. The platform features very narrow open tubular columns, and is hence particularly suited for limited sample amounts. For enzymatic digestion of proteins, samples are passed through a 20 µm inner diameter (ID) trypsin + endoproteinase Lys-C immobilized open tubular enzyme reactor (OTER). Resulting peptides are subsequently trapped on a monolithic pre-column and transferred on-line to a 10 µm ID porous layer open tubular (PLOT) liquid chromatography LC separation column. Wnt/ß-catenein signaling pathway (Wnt-pathway) proteins of potentially diagnostic value were digested+detected in targeted-MS/MS mode in small cell samples and tumor tissues within 120 minutes. For example, a potential biomarker Axin1 was identifiable in just 10 ng of sample (protein extract of ∼1,000 HCT15 colon cancer cells). In comprehensive mode, the current OTER-PLOT set-up could be used to identify approximately 1500 proteins in HCT15 cells using a relatively short digestion+detection cycle (240 minutes), outperforming previously reported on-line digestion/separation systems. The platform is fully automated utilizing common commercial instrumentation and parts, while the reactor and columns are simple to produce and have low carry-over. These initial results point to automated solutions for fast and very sensitive MS based proteomics, especially for samples of limited size.

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<![CDATA[Peptidases Compartmentalized to the Ascaris suum Intestinal Lumen and Apical Intestinal Membrane]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dab7ab0ee8fa60bad6c4

The nematode intestine is a tissue of interest for developing new methods of therapy and control of parasitic nematodes. However, biological details of intestinal cell functions remain obscure, as do the proteins and molecular functions located on the apical intestinal membrane (AIM), and within the intestinal lumen (IL) of nematodes. Accordingly, methods were developed to gain a comprehensive identification of peptidases that function in the intestinal tract of adult female Ascaris suum. Peptidase activity was detected in multiple fractions of the A. suum intestine under pH conditions ranging from 5.0 to 8.0. Peptidase class inhibitors were used to characterize these activities. The fractions included whole lysates, membrane enriched fractions, and physiological- and 4 molar urea-perfusates of the intestinal lumen. Concanavalin A (ConA) was confirmed to bind to the AIM, and intestinal proteins affinity isolated on ConA-beads were compared to proteins from membrane and perfusate fractions by mass spectrometry. Twenty-nine predicted peptidases were identified including aspartic, cysteine, and serine peptidases, and an unexpectedly high number (16) of metallopeptidases. Many of these proteins co-localized to multiple fractions, providing independent support for localization to specific intestinal compartments, including the IL and AIM. This unique perfusion model produced the most comprehensive view of likely digestive peptidases that function in these intestinal compartments of A. suum, or any nematode. This model offers a means to directly determine functions of these proteins in the A. suum intestine and, more generally, deduce the wide array functions that exist in these cellular compartments of the nematode intestine.

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<![CDATA[Effects of protease and non-starch polysaccharide enzyme on performance, digestive function, activity and gene expression of endogenous enzyme of broilers]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbf2d

Three hundred one-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were fed corn-soybean basal diets containing non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) enzyme and different levels of acid protease from 1 to 42 days of age to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes on growth performance, digestive function, activity of endogenous digestive enzymes in the pancreas and mRNA expression of pancreatic digestive enzymes. For days 1-42, compared to the control chickens, average daily feed intake (ADFI) and average daily gain (ADG) were significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme in combination with protease supplementation at 40 or 80 mg/kg (p<0.05). Feed-to-gain ratio (FGR) was significantly improved by supplementation with NSP enzymes or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease compared to the control diet (p<0.05). Apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP) was significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease (p<0.05). Cholecystokinin (CCK) level in serum was reduced by 31.39% with NSP enzyme combined with protease supplementation at 160 mg/kg (p<0.05), but the CCK level in serum was increased by 26.51% with NSP enzyme supplementation alone. After 21 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 74.13%, 70.66% and 42.59% (p<0.05), respectively. After 42 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 32.45% and 27.41%, respectively (p<0.05). However, supplementation with NSP enzyme and 80 or 160 mg/kg protease decreased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 10.75% and 25.88%, respectively (p<0.05). The activities of pancreatic lipase and amylase were significantly higher in treated animals than they were in the control group (p<0.05). Supplementation with NSP enzyme, NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased pancreatic trypsin mRNA levels by 40%, 44% and 28%, respectively. Supplementation with NSP enzyme and 160 mg/kg protease decreased pancreatic trypsin mRNA levels by 13%. Pancreatic lipase and amylase mRNA expression were significantly elevated in treated animals compared to the control group (p<0.05). These results suggest that the amount of NSP enzyme and acid protease in the diet significantly affects digestive function, endogenous digestive-enzyme activity and mRNA expression in broilers.

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<![CDATA[PLoS Biology Issue Image | Vol. 16(7) July 2018]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b6d8c4b463d7e2ccdcccfea

Deconstructing the principles of ductal network formation in the pancreas

In the pancreas of mammals, digestive enzymes are transported from their production site in acini (clusters of cells that secrete the enzymes) to the intestine via a network of ducts. During organ development in fetuses, the ducts initially form by the coordinated polarization of cells to form small holes, which will connect and fuse, to constitute a meshwork. This hyperconnected network further develops into a treelike structure by the time of birth. This study by Dahl-Jensen et al. uses methods originally developed to analyze road, rail, web, or river networks to quantify the network properties at different developmental stages. The authors find that the pancreatic network properties are similar between individuals at specific time points but eventually change to achieve the most economical and optimized structure to deliver pancreatic juice into the duodenum. The image shows a confocal immunofluorescent microscopy image of the pancreas from a mouse embryo at 18.5 days' gestation. Pancreatic ducts (as well as the surrounding duodenum) are shown in green (stained for β-catenin) and the islets of Langerhans appear in red (stained for insulin).

Image Credit: Dror Sever

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<![CDATA[Midgut Transcriptome of the Cockroach Periplaneta americana and Its Microbiota: Digestion, Detoxification and Oxidative Stress Response]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da82ab0ee8fa60b9b31e

The cockroach, Periplaneta americana, is an obnoxious and notorious pest of the world, with a strong ability to adapt to a variety of complex environments. However, the molecular mechanism of this adaptability is mostly unknown. In this study, the genes and microbiota composition associated with the adaptation mechanism were studied by analyzing the transcriptome and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing of the P. americana midgut, respectively. Midgut transcriptome analysis identified 82,905 unigenes, among which 64 genes putatively involved in digestion (11 genes), detoxification (37 genes) and oxidative stress response (16 genes) were found. Evaluation of gene expression following treatment with cycloxaprid further revealed that the selected genes (CYP6J1, CYP4C1, CYP6K1, Delta GST, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and aminopeptidase) were upregulated at least 2.0-fold at the transcriptional level, and four genes were upregulated more than 10.0-fold. An interesting finding was that three digestive enzymes positively responded to cycloxaprid application. Tissue expression profiles further showed that most of the selected genes were midgut-biased, with the exception of CYP6K1. The midgut microbiota composition was obtained via 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was found to be mainly dominated by organisms from the Firmicutes phylum, among which Clostridiales, Lactobacillales and Burkholderiales were the main orders which might assist the host in the food digestion or detoxification of noxious compounds. The preponderant species, Clostridium cellulovorans, was previously reported to degrade lignocellulose efficiently in insects. The abundance of genes involved in digestion, detoxification and response to oxidative stress, and the diversity of microbiota in the midgut might provide P. americana high capacity to adapt to complex environments.

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<![CDATA[Genomes and Transcriptomes of Partners in Plant-Fungal- Interactions between Canola (Brassica napus) and Two Leptosphaeria Species]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9d2ab0ee8fa60b64abb

Leptosphaeria maculans ‘brassicae’ is a damaging fungal pathogen of canola (Brassica napus), causing lesions on cotyledons and leaves, and cankers on the lower stem. A related species, L. biglobosa ‘canadensis’, colonises cotyledons but causes few stem cankers. We describe the complement of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZys) and peptidases of these fungi, as well as of four related plant pathogens. We also report dual-organism RNA-seq transcriptomes of these two Leptosphaeria species and B. napus during disease. During the first seven days of infection L. biglobosa ‘canadensis’, a necrotroph, expressed more cell wall degrading genes than L. maculans ‘brassicae’, a hemi-biotroph. L. maculans ‘brassicae’ expressed many genes in the Carbohydrate Binding Module class of CAZy, particularly CBM50 genes, with potential roles in the evasion of basal innate immunity in the host plant. At this time, three avirulence genes were amongst the top 20 most highly upregulated L. maculans ‘brassicae’ genes in planta. The two fungi had a similar number of peptidase genes, and trypsin was transcribed at high levels by both fungi early in infection. L. biglobosa ‘canadensis’ infection activated the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid defence pathways in B. napus, consistent with defence against necrotrophs. L. maculans ‘brassicae’ triggered a high level of expression of isochorismate synthase 1, a reporter for salicylic acid signalling. L. biglobosa ‘canadensis’ infection triggered coordinated shutdown of photosynthesis genes, and a concomitant increase in transcription of cell wall remodelling genes of the host plant. Expression of particular classes of CAZy genes and the triggering of host defence and particular metabolic pathways are consistent with the necrotrophic lifestyle of L. biglobosa ‘canadensis’, and the hemibiotrophic life style of L. maculans ‘brassicae’.

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