ResearchPad - diuretics https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Dialysis timing may be deferred toward very late initiation: An observational study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14499 The optimal timing to initiate dialysis among patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of <5 mL/min/1.73 m2 is unknown. We hypothesized that dialysis initiation time can be deferred in this population even with high uremic burden. A case-crossover study with case (0–30 days before dialysis initiation [DI]) and control (90–120 days before DI) periods was conducted in 1,079 hemodialysis patients aged 18–90 years at China Medical University Hospital between 2006 and 2015. The uremic burden was quantified based on 7 uremic indicators that reached the predefined threshold in case period, namely hemoglobin, serum albumin, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, potassium, phosphorus, and bicarbonate. Dialysis timing was classified as standard (met 0–2 uremic indicators), late (3–5 indicators), and very late (6–7 indicators). Median eGFR-DI of the 1,079 patients was 3.4 mL/min/1.73 m2 and was 2.7 mL/min/1.73 m2 in patients with very late initiation. The median follow-up duration was 2.42 years. Antibiotics, diuretics, antihypertensive medications, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were more prevalently used during the case period. The fully adjusted hazards ratios of all-cause mortality for the late and very late groups were 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.76–1.24) and 0.83 (0.61–1.15) compared with the standard group. It is safe to defer dialysis initiation among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) having an eGFR of <5 mL/min/1.73 m2 even when patients having multiple biochemical uremic burdens. Coordinated efforts in acute infection prevention, optimal fluid management, and prevention of accidental exposure to NSAIDs are crucial to prolong the dialysis-free survival.

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<![CDATA[Thiazide-associated hyponatremia attenuates the fracture-protective effect of thiazide: A population-based study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c141eecd5eed0c484d28d87

Background

Thiazide, a first-line therapy for hypertension, lowers blood pressure, increases bone mineral density, and reduces the risk of fractures. However, hyponatremia, an adverse effect of thiazide, is associated with increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures. It is currently unclear whether thiazide-associated hyponatremia (TAH) outweighs the protective effects of thiazide.

Methods

Using data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified patients who were prescribed thiazide between 1998 and 2010. Those diagnosed with hyponatremia within three years after initiation of thiazide were selected for the TAH group. Thiazide users without hyponatremia were selected for the control group. The association between TAH and fracture risk was further evaluated using multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for comorbidities and medications. Subjects were followed up from the index date until the appearance of a fracture, death, or the end of a 3-year period.

Results

A total of 1212 patients were included in the TAH group, matched with 4848 patients in the control group. The incidence rate of fracture was higher in the TAH group than in the control group (31.4 versus 20.6 per 1000 person-years). TAH was associated with a higher risk of total fractures (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15–1.88), vertebra fractures (aHR: 1.84, 95% CI = 1.12–3.01), and hip fractures (aHR: 1.66, 95% CI = 1.12–2.46) after controlling for comorbidities and other medications.

Conclusions

Thiazide users with hyponatremia have a higher risk of fracture than thiazide users without hyponatremia. The fracture-protective effect of thiazide is attenuated by TAH.

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<![CDATA[Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Dialysis outside the Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective Observational Single-Center Study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db2dab0ee8fa60bd1a7a

Introduction

The number of patients suffering from acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D) is increasing. Whereas causes and outcome of AKI-D in the intensive care unit (ICU) are described extensively, few data exist about AKI-D patients treated outside the ICU. Aim of this study was to identify the causes of AKI-D, determine in-depth the comorbid conditions and outcome of this particular patient group and identify possibilities for its prevention.

Methods

We retrospectively studied all AKI-D patients treated outside the ICU in a single nephrology referral center between January 2010 and June 2015. Data on comorbid conditions, renal function and drug therapy prior to AKI-D, and possible causal events were collected. Patients were grouped into those with renal hypoperfusion as the predominant cause of AKI-D (hemodynamic group) and those with other causes (non-hemodynamic group).

Results

During 66 months 128 patients (57% male, mean age 69.3 years) were treated. AKI-D was community-acquired in 70.3%. The most frequent comorbidities were hypertension (62.5%), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (58.9%), coronary artery disease (CAD) (46.1%), diabetes (35.9%) and heart failure (34.1%). Most patients were prescribed diuretics (61.7%) and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RASI) (57.8%); 46.1% had a combination of both. In the 88 patients with hemodynamic AKI-D (68.8%) the most frequent initiating events were diarrhea (39.8%), infections (17.0%) and acute heart failure (13.6%). In the 40 patients with non-hemodynamic AKI-D (31.2%) interstitial nephritis (n = 15) was the prominent diagnosis. Patients with hemodynamic AKI-D were older (72.6 vs. 62.1 years, p = 0.001), suffered more often from CKD (68.2% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.003), CAD (54.5% vs. 27.5%, p = 0.004) and diabetes (42.0% vs. 22.5%, p = 0.033), and were more frequently on diuretics (75.0% vs. 32.5%, p<0.001), RASI (67.0% vs. 37.5%, p = 0.002) or their combination (58.0% vs. 20.0%, p<0.001). Twenty-two (17.2%) patients died and 27 (21.1%) patients died or developed end-stage renal disease.

Conclusion

AKI-D treated outside the ICU is most often caused by renal hypoperfusion. It predominantly afflicts elderly patients with one or more comorbid conditions, who are treated with diuretics and RASI and have an acute illness leading to volume depletion. Early discontinuation of these drugs may be a successful strategy to avoid AKI-D in vulnerable patients.

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<![CDATA[Autonomic Predictors of Hospitalization Due to Heart Failure Decompensation in Patients with Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da69ab0ee8fa60b9272a

Introduction

Autonomic nervous system balance can be significantly deteriorated during heart failure exacerbation. However, it is still unknown whether these changes are only the consequence of heart failure decompensation or can also predict development thereof. Objectives were to verify if simple, non-invasive autonomic parameters, such as baroreflex sensitivity and short-term heart rate variability can provide independent of other well-known clinical parameters information on the risk of heart failure decompensation in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

Methods

In 142 stable patients with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 40%, baroreflex sensitivity and short-term heart rate variability, as well as other well-known clinical parameters, were analyzed. During 23 ± 9 months of follow-up 19 patients were hospitalized due to the heart failure decompensation (EVENT).

Results

Pre-specified cut-off values of baroreflex sensitivity (≤2.4 ms/mmHg) and low frequency power index of heart rate variability (≤19 ms2) were significantly associated with the EVENTs (hazard ratio 4.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35–14.54 and 5.41, 95% CI 1.87–15.65 respectively). EVENTs were also associated with other parameters, such as left ventricular ejection fraction, NYHA class, diuretic use, renal function, brain natriuretic peptide and hemoglobin level, left atrial size, left and right ventricular heart failure signs. After adjusting baroreflex sensitivity and low frequency power index for each of the abovementioned parameters, autonomic parameters were still significant predictors of hospitalization due to the heart failure decompensation.

Conclusion

Simple, noninvasive autonomic indices can be helpful in identifying individuals with increased risk of hospitalization due to the heart failure decompensation among clinically stable patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, even when adjusted for other well-known clinical parameters.

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<![CDATA[Adverse Drug Reactions in a Tertiary Care Emergency Medicine Ward - Prevalence, Preventability and Reporting]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f9ab0ee8fa60b7137b

Purpose

To identify the prevalence and preventability of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in an emergency ward setting in a tertiary hospital in Sweden and to what extent the detected ADRs were reported to the Medical Product Agency (MPA).

Methods

In this prospective cross sectional observational study, 706 patients admitted to one of the Emergency Wards, at the Karolinska University Hospital in Solna, Stockholm during September 2008 –September 2009, were included. The electronic patient records were reviewed for patients’ demographic parameters, prevalence of possible ADRs and assessment of their preventability. In addition, the extent of formal and required ADR reporting to national registers was studied.

Results

Approximately 40 percent of the patient population had at least one possible ADR (n = 284). In the multivariable regression model, age and number of drugs were significantly associated with risk of presenting with an ADR (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). Sex was not identified as a significant predictor of ADRs (p = 0.27). The most common ADRs were cardiovascular, followed by electrolyte disturbances, and hemorrhage. In 18 percent of the patient population ADRs were the reason for admission or had contributed to admission and 24% of these ADRs were assessed as preventable. The under-reporting of ADRs to the MPA was 99%.

Conclusions

ADRs are common in Emergency Medicine in tertiary care in Sweden, but under-reporting of ADRs is substantial. The most frequent ADRs are caused by cardiovascular drugs, and significantly associated with age and number of drugs. However, only a minority of the detected serious ADRs contributing to admission could have been avoided by increased risk awareness.

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<![CDATA[Cardiovascular and Renal Outcomes of Renin–Angiotensin System Blockade in Adult Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review with Network Meta-Analyses]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da8dab0ee8fa60b9eb87

Background

Medications aimed at inhibiting the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) have been used extensively for preventing cardiovascular and renal complications in patients with diabetes, but data that compare their clinical effectiveness are limited. We aimed to compare the effects of classes of RAS blockers on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in adults with diabetes.

Methods and Findings

Eligible trials were identified by electronic searches in PubMed/MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (1 January 2004 to 17 July 2014). Interventions of interest were angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and direct renin (DR) inhibitors. The primary endpoints were cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke—singly and as a composite endpoint, major cardiovascular outcome—and end-stage renal disease [ESRD], doubling of serum creatinine, and all-cause mortality—singly and as a composite endpoint, progression of renal disease. Secondary endpoints were angina pectoris and hospitalization for heart failure. In all, 71 trials (103,120 participants), with a total of 14 different regimens, were pooled using network meta-analyses. When compared with ACE inhibitor, no other RAS blocker used in monotherapy and/or combination was associated with a significant reduction in major cardiovascular outcomes: ARB (odds ratio [OR] 1.02; 95% credible interval [CrI] 0.90–1.18), ACE inhibitor plus ARB (0.97; 95% CrI 0.79–1.19), DR inhibitor plus ACE inhibitor (1.32; 95% CrI 0.96–1.81), and DR inhibitor plus ARB (1.00; 95% CrI 0.73–1.38). For the risk of progression of renal disease, no significant differences were detected between ACE inhibitor and each of the remaining therapies: ARB (OR 1.10; 95% CrI 0.90–1.40), ACE inhibitor plus ARB (0.97; 95% CrI 0.72–1.29), DR inhibitor plus ACE inhibitor (0.99; 95% CrI 0.65–1.57), and DR inhibitor plus ARB (1.18; 95% CrI 0.78–1.84). No significant differences were showed between ACE inhibitors and ARBs with respect to all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, angina pectoris, hospitalization for heart failure, ESRD, or doubling serum creatinine. Findings were limited by the clinical and methodological heterogeneity of the included studies. Potential inconsistency was identified in network meta-analyses of stroke and angina pectoris, limiting the conclusiveness of findings for these single endpoints.

Conclusions

In adults with diabetes, comparisons of different RAS blockers showed similar effects of ACE inhibitors and ARBs on major cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Compared with monotherapies, the combination of an ACE inhibitor and an ARB failed to provide significant benefits on major outcomes. Clinicians should discuss the balance between benefits, costs, and potential harms with individual diabetes patients before starting treatment.

Review registration

PROSPERO CRD42014014404

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<![CDATA[The Clinical Efficacy and Cardiotoxicity of Fixed-Dose Monthly Trastuzumab in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: A Single Institutional Analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dac4ab0ee8fa60bb1e6e

Objective

Trastuzumab-containing treatment regimens have been shown to improve survival outcomes in HER2-positive breast cancer (BC). It is much easier to infuse a fixed one-vial dose to every patient on a regular schedule in the general clinical setting. The aims of this study were evaluating the efficacy of a 440 mg fixed-dose of trastuzumab administered on a monthly infusion schedule, and the risk factors for cardiac events.

Patients and methods

We retrospectively reviewed data from 300 HER2-positive BC patients in our institute: 208 were early-stage BC patients undergoing adjuvant trastuzumab treatment, and 92 were metastatic BC patients treated with trastuzumab infusions until disease progression. There were 181 patients receiving regular trastuzumab infusions every 3 weeks (Q3W; 8 mg/kg loading dose followed by 6 mg/kg every 3 weeks), and the other 119 patients were treated monthly with a fixed 440 mg dose (QM; fixed 440 mg every 4 weeks).

Results

The medians of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in the adjuvant setting were not reached in both treatment groups. In the metastatic setting, there was no significant difference between groups in PFS or OS. The median time to significant cardiovascular (CV) dysfunction was 4.54 months. The incidence of congestive heart failure requiring medication in our cohort was 3.4%.

Conclusion

In our study, we found that fixed-dose monthly trastuzumab was feasible and effective. In addition, the CV risk was not higher with the fixed-dose protocol. This treatment modality could lower the cost and was easier to implement in clinical practice. Larger prospective randomized studies with longer-term follow up are needed to confirm our results.

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<![CDATA[Hypoglycemia following intravenous insulin plus glucose for hyperkalemia in patients with impaired renal function]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db53ab0ee8fa60bdcb6b

Background

Hypoglycemia is a serious complication following the administration of insulin for hyperkalemia. We determined the incidence of hypoglycemia and severe hypoglycemia (blood glucose <70 or ≤40 mg/dl, respectively) in a cohort of AKI and non-dialysis dependent CKD patients who received an intravenous infusion of insulin plus glucose to treat hyperkalemia.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed charts of all AKI and non-dialysis dependent CKD patients who received 10 U of insulin plus 50 g glucose to treat hyperkalemia from December 1, 2013 to May 31, 2015 at our Department.

Results

One hundred sixty four episodes of hyperkalemia were treated with insulin plus glucose and were eligible for analysis. Serum potassium levels dropped by 1.18 ± 1.01 mmol/l. Eleven treatments (6.1%) resulted in hypoglycemia and two (1.2%) in severe hypoglycemia. A lower pretreatment blood glucose tended to associate with a higher subsequent risk of hypoglycemia. Age, sex, renal function, an established diagnosis of diabetes or previous treatment were not associated with the development of this complication. We did not register any significant adverse events.

Conclusion

Our intravenous regimen combining an infusion of insulin plus glucose effectively reduced serum potassium levels compared to previous studies and associated a low risk of symptomatic hypoglycemia and other complications.

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<![CDATA[Assessment of the ability of CT urography with low-dose multi-phasic excretory phases for opacification of the urinary system]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db51ab0ee8fa60bdc267

Objective

To prospectively evaluate the ability of CT urography with a low-dose multi-phasic excretory phase for opacification of the urinary system.

Materials and methods

Thirty-two patients underwent CT urography with low-dose multi-phasic s using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D acquired at 5-, 10-, and 15-minute delays. Opacification scores of the upper urinary tracts and the urinary bladder were assigned for each excretory phase by two radiologists, who recorded whether adequate (>75%) or complete (100%) opacification of the upper urinary tract and urinary bladder was achieved in each patient. Adequate and complete opacification rates of the upper urinary tracts and the urinary bladder were compared among three excretory phases and among combined multi-phasic excretory phases using Cochran's Q test.

Results

There was no significant difference among three excretory phases with 5-, 10-, and 15-minute delays in adequate (56.3, 43.8, and 63.5%, respectively; P = 0.174) and complete opacification rates (9.3, 15.6, and 18.7%, respectively; P = 0.417) of the upper urinary tracts. Combined tri-phasic excretory phases significantly improved adequate and complete opacification rates to 84.4% and 43.8%, respectively (P = 0.002). In contrast, there were significant differences among three excretory phases for the rate of adequate (31.3, 84.4, and 93.8%, respectively; P<0.001) and complete opacification (21.9, 53.1, and 81.3%, respectively; P<0.001) of the urinary bladder. Multi-phasic excretory phases did not improve these rates because opacification was always better with a longer delay.

Conclusion

Although multi-phasic acquisition of excretory phases is effective at improving opacification of the upper urinary tracts, complete opacification is difficult even with tri-phasic acquisition.

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<![CDATA[Urinary Strong Ion Difference as a Marker of Renal Dysfunction. A Retrospective Analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db27ab0ee8fa60bd08f5

Introduction

The kidneys play a crucial role in the regulation of electrolytes and acid-base homeostasis. Urinary Strong Ion Difference (SIDu = NaU + KU—ClU) represents an important aspect of renal acid-base regulation. We evaluated the role of SIDu as a marker of renal dysfunction in critically ill patients.

Materials and Methods

Patients admitted to the Medical Intensive Care Unit with a diagnosis of AKI for whom concomitant urinary samples available for SIDu calculation were retrospectively reviewed and staged according to KDIGO criteria for 3 days from inclusion. Patients were classified as Recovered (R-AKI) or Persistent-AKI (P-AKI) whether they exited KDIGO criteria within the 3-day observation period or not. A control group with normal renal function and normal serum acid-base and electrolytes was prospectively recruited in order to identify reference SIDu values.

Results

One-hundred-and-forty-three patients with a diagnosis of AKI were included: 77 with R-AKI, and 66 with P-AKI. Thirty-six controls were recruited. Patients with P-AKI had more severe renal dysfunction and higher mortality than patients with R-AKI (SCr 2.23(IQR:1.68–3.45) and 1.81(IQR1.5–2.5) mg/dl respectively, p<0.001; 24-h UO 1297(950) and 2100(1094) ml respectively, p = 0.003); 30-d mortality, 39% and 13% respectively; p<0.001). SIDu significantly differed between groups, with rising values from controls to P-AKI groups (16.4(12), 30(24) and 47.3(21.5) mEq/l respectively, p<0.001).

Discussion

SIDu may be a simple and inexpensive tool in AKI patients’ evaluation. Further research is needed to evaluate the ability of SIDu to identify patients with renal dysfunction before derangements in serum creatinine or urine output are observed.

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<![CDATA[Antihypertensive Medication Classes Used among Medicare Beneficiaries Initiating Treatment in 2007–2010]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da7dab0ee8fa60b9953e

Background

After the 2003 publication of the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) guidelines, there was a 5–10% increase in patients initiating antihypertensive medication with a thiazide-type diuretic, but most patients still did not initiate treatment with this class. There are few contemporary published data on antihypertensive medication classes filled by patients initiating treatment.

Methods and Findings

We used the 5% random Medicare sample to study the initiation of antihypertensive medication between 2007 and 2010. Initiation was defined by the first antihypertensive medication fill preceded by 365 days with no antihypertensive medication fills. We restricted our analysis to beneficiaries ≥65 years who had two or more outpatient visits with a hypertension diagnosis and full Medicare fee-for-service coverage for the 365 days prior to initiation of antihypertensive medication. Between 2007 and 2010, 32,142 beneficiaries in the 5% Medicare sample initiated antihypertensive medication. Initiation with a thiazide-type diuretic decreased from 19.2% in 2007 to 17.9% in 2010. No other changes in medication classes initiated occurred over this period. Among those initiating antihypertensive medication in 2010, 31.3% filled angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), 26.9% filled beta blockers, 17.2% filled calcium channel blockers, and 14.4% filled angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Initiation with >1 antihypertensive medication class decreased from 25.6% in 2007 to 24.1% in 2010. Patients initiated >1 antihypertensive medication class most commonly with a thiazide-type diuretic and either an ACE-I or ARB.

Conclusion

These results suggest that JNC 7 had a limited long-term impact on the choice of antihypertensive medication class and provide baseline data prior to the publication of the 2014 Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults from the Panel Members Appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8).

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<![CDATA[Prediction of diuretic response to tolvaptan by a simple, readily available spot urine Na/K ratio]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db51ab0ee8fa60bdc293

Background

Tolvaptan is vasopressin type 2 receptor antagonist that inhibits water reabsorption. It is used in combination with standard diuretics to treat ascites unresponsive to standard diuretic therapy or hyponatremia because of liver cirrhosis. This study evaluated the effectiveness and safety of tolvaptan in clinical practice and aimed to determine the factors related to its effectiveness.

Methods

Tolvaptan was administered to 88 consecutive cirrhotic patients with ascites unresponsive to standard diuretic therapy. An effective treatment response was a ≥2% reduction in body weight on day 7. The association of patient pretreatment characteristics with therapeutic effects was analyzed.

Results

Mean weight reduction on day 7 of tolvaptan therapy was −2.9% ± 3.2%, and treatment was effective in 52% of patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that spot urine Na/K ratio ≥2.5 at baseline was the only factor independently related to therapeutic effect, with an odds ratio of 7.85 (95% confidence interval 2.64–23.40, p = 0.0002). Weight reduction percentage on day 7 was −4.0% ± 2.8% in patients with spot urine Na/K ≥2.5, which was significantly greater than the 0.7% ± 2.7% loss in those with urine Na/K < 2.5 (p < 0.05). A spot urine Na/K ratio ≥2.5 had a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 60% for predicting effective treatment. No adverse events of treatment led to treatment discontinuation.

Conclusions

Baseline spot urine Na/K was predictive of an effective response to tolvaptan therapy. It is simple to perform and readily available and might serve as an indicator of optimal timing of tolvaptan administration in patients with inadequate response to conventional Na diuretic therapy.

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<![CDATA[The Intensity of Primary Care for Heart Failure Patients: A Determinant of Readmissions? The CarPaths Study: A French Region-Wide Analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db46ab0ee8fa60bd8762

Background

We aimed to classify patients with heart failure (HF) by the style of primary care they receive.

Methods and Results

We used the claim data (SNIIRAM: Système National d’Information Inter-Régime de l’Assurance Maladie) of patients living in a French region. We evaluated three concepts. First, baseline clinical status with age and Charlson index. Second, primary care practice style with mean delay between consultations, quantity of nursing care, and variability of diuretic dose. Third, clinical outcomes with death during follow-up, readmission for HF, and rate of unforeseen consultations. The baseline clinical status and the clinical outcomes were included to give an insight in the reasons for, and performance of, primary care practice style. Patients were classified using a hierarchical ascending classification based on principal components. A total of 2,751 patients were included in this study and were followed for a median of 22 months. The mean age was 78 y (SD: 12); 484 (18%) died, and 818 (30%) were readmitted for HF. We found three different significant groups characterized by their need for care and the intensity of practice style: group 1 (N = 734) was “low need-low intensity”; group 2 (N = 1,060) was “high need-low intensity”; and group 3 (N = 957) was “high need-high intensity”. Their readmission rates were 17%, 41% and 28%, respectively.

Conclusions

This study evaluated the link between primary care, clinical status and main clinical outcomes in HF patients. In higher need patients, a low-intensity practice style was associated with poorer clinical outcomes.

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<![CDATA[Spilanthol from Acmella Oleracea Lowers the Intracellular Levels of cAMP Impairing NKCC2 Phosphorylation and Water Channel AQP2 Membrane Expression in Mouse Kidney]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9edab0ee8fa60b6d478

Acmella oleracea is well recognized in Brazilian traditional medicine as diuretic, although few scientific data have been published to support this effect. Aim of this study was to determine the molecular effect of Acmella oleracea extract and its main alkylamide spilanthol on two major processes involved in the urine concentrating mechanism: Na-K-2Cl symporter (NKCC2) activity in the thick ascending limb and water channel aquaporin 2 accumulation at the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct cells. Phosphorylation of NKCC2 was evaluated as index of its activation by Western blotting. Rate of aquaporin 2 apical expression was analyzed by confocal laser microscopy. Spilanthol-induced intracellular signalling events were dissected by video-imaging experiments. Exposure to spilanthol reduced the basal phosphorylation level of NKCC2 both in freshly isolated mouse kidney slices and in NKCC2-expresing HEK293 cells. In addition, exposure to spilanthol strongly reduced both desmopressin and low Cl-dependent increase in NKCC2 phosphorylation in mouse kidney slices and NKCC2-expressing HEK293 cells, respectively. Similarly, spilanthol reduced both desmopressin- and forskolin-stimulated aquaporin 2 accumulation at the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct in mouse kidney slice and MCD4 cells, respectively. Of note, when orally administered, spilanthol induced a significant increase in both urine output and salt urinary excretion associated with a markedly reduced urine osmolality compared with control mice. Finally, at cellular level, spilanthol rapidly reduced or reversed basal and agonist-increased cAMP levels through a mechanism involving increases in intracellular [Ca2+]. In conclusion, spilanthol-induced inhibition of cAMP production negatively modulates urine-concentrating mechanisms thus holding great promise for its use as diuretic.

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<![CDATA[Serum Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Is Associated with Low Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction and Elevated Plasma Brain-Type Natriuretic Peptide Level]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4fab0ee8fa60bdb967

Background

Recent studies have suggested that soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), a biomarker of subclinical levels of inflammation, is significantly correlated with cardiovascular events.

Purpose

We investigated the association between suPAR and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) among cardiac inpatients.

Methods and Results

In total, 242 patients (mean age 71.3 ± 9.8 years; 70 women) admitted to the cardiology department were enrolled in the study. suPAR was significantly correlated with LVEF (R = -0.24, P<0.001), LVMI (R = 0.16, P = 0.014) and BNP (R = 0.46, P<0.001). In logistic regression analysis, the highest suPAR tertile (> 3236 pg/mL) was associated with low LVEF (< 50%) and elevated BNP (> 300 pg/mL) with an odds ratio of 3.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22–12.1) and 5.36 (95% CI, 1.32–21.8), respectively, after adjusting for age, sex, log-transformed estimated glomerular filtration rate (log(eGFR)), C-reactive protein, and diuretic use. The association between suPAR and LVMI was not statistically significant. In multivariate receiver operating characteristic analysis, addition of log(suPAR) to the combination of age, sex, log(eGFR) and CRP incrementally improved the prediction of low LVEF (area under the curve [AUC], 0.827 to 0.852, P = 0.046) and BNP ≥ 300 pg/mL (AUC, 0.869 to 0.906; P = 0.029).

Conclusions

suPAR was associated with low LVEF and elevated BNP, but not with left ventricular hypertrophy, independent of CRP, renal function, and diuretic use among cardiac inpatients who were not undergoing chronic hemodialysis.

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<![CDATA[Safety of Eplerenone for Kidney-Transplant Recipients with Impaired Renal Function and Receiving Cyclosporine A]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daa8ab0ee8fa60ba827e

Background

Animal studies have highlighted the role of vascular mineralocorticoid receptor during Cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists could improve kidney survival but are not commonly used during renal impairment and in association with several immunosuppressive drugs due to a supposed higher risk of adverse events. We tested the tolerance of eplerenone according to its expected adverse events: hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, acute kidney failure, or any other adverse event.

Methods

We conducted a single-center, prospective, open-label study in 31 kidney-transplant recipients with impaired renal function (30 and 50 mL/min/1.73m2) and receiving cyclosporine A. All patients received eplerenone 25 mg/d for 8 weeks. Serum potassium, renal function and expected adverse events were closely monitored.

Results

Eight patients experienced mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L), one moderate hyperkalemia (>5.5 mmol/L) and had to receive potassium-exchange resin. No severe hyperkalemia (>6 mmol/L) occurred. One acute kidney failure was observed, secondary to diarrhea. Basal serum potassium and bicarbonate were independently associated with a higher risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L) under treatment (OR 6.5, p = 0.003 and 0.7, p = 0.007, respectively). A cut-off value of 4.35 mmol/L for basal serum potassium was the best factor to predict the risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L).

Conclusions

Until eGFR falls to 30 mL/min/1.73m2, eplerenone could be safely given to kidney-transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine A, if kalemia is closely monitored. When renal function is impaired and if basal kalemia is >4.35 mmol/L, then clinicians should properly balance risk and benefit of eplerenone use and offer dietary advice. An adequately powered prospective randomized study is now needed to test its efficiency (and safety) in this population.

Trial Registration

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01834768

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<![CDATA[Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Hyponatremia in Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Data from the Akershus Cardiac Examination (ACE) 2 Study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dae3ab0ee8fa60bbc4f2

Background

Hyponatremia is prevalent and associated with mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). The prevalence and prognostic implications of hyponatremia in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary (AECOPD) have not been established.

Method

We included 313 unselected patients with acute dyspnea who were categorized by etiology of dyspnea according to established guidelines (derivation cohort). Serum Na+ was determined on hospital admission and corrected for hyperglycemia, and hyponatremia was defined as [Na+]<137 mmol/L. Survival was ascertained after a median follow-up of 816 days and outcome was analyzed in acute HF (n = 143) and AECOPD (n = 83) separately. Results were confirmed in an independent AECOPD validation cohort (n = 99).

Results

In the derivation cohort, median serum Na+ was lower in AECOPD vs. acute HF (138.5 [135.9–140.5] vs. 139.2 [136.7–141.3] mmol/L, p = 0.02), while prevalence of hyponatremia (27% [22/83] vs. 20% [29/143], p = 0.28) and mortality rate (42% [35/83] vs. 46% [66/143], p = 0.56) were similar. By univariate Cox regression analysis, hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality in acute HF (HR 1.85 [95% CI 1.08, 3.16], p = 0.02), but not in AECOPD (HR 1.00 [0.47, 2.15], p = 1.00). Analogous to the results of the derivation cohort, hyponatremia was prevalent also in the AECOPD validation cohort (25% [25/99]), but not associated with mortality. The diverging effect of hyponatremia on outcome between AECOPD and acute HF was statistically significant (p = 0.04).

Conclusion

Hyponatremia is prevalent in patients with acute HF and AECOPD, but is associated with mortality in patients with acute HF only.

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<![CDATA[Hyponatremia and increased risk of dementia: A population-based retrospective cohort study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5dab0ee8fa60be0453

Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder and also a predictor of mild cognition impairment. However, the association between hyponatremia and dementia in long follow up periods is rarely investigated. A retrospective cohort study was performed using the claims data of all insured residents who were covered by Taiwan’s universal health insurance from 2000 to 2011. A total of 4900 hyponatremia patients and 19545 matched comparisons were recruited for the analysis. The incidences of hyponatremia and dementia were diagnosed with clinical protocol and defined using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). Cox proportional hazard regression and Kaplan–Meier curves were used for the analyses. Independent of adjusting factors, hyponatremia patients had 2.36-fold higher chances of suffering dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and non-AD dementia, than the comparisons. Severe hyponatremia patients had higher risks of suffering dementia than the non-severe hyponatremia patients (adjusted hazard ratio: 4.29 (95% CI: 3.47–5.31) versus 2.08 (95% CI: 1.83–2.37)). A dose response relationship was observed between hyponatremia and dementia. Those hyponatremia patients with baseline or incident stroke had significantly higher chances of suffering dementia compared with those patients without hyponatremia and stroke. Stroke is a significant modifier of the relationship between hyponatremia and dementia. Cerebrovascular disease after incident hyponatremia must be prevented to reduce the incidence of dementia.

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<![CDATA[A Critical Analysis of Concentration and Competition in the Indian Pharmaceutical Market]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9d3ab0ee8fa60b64f36

Objectives

It can be argued that with several players marketing a large number of brands, the pharmaceutical market in India is competitive. However, the pharmaceutical market should not be studied as a single market but, as a sum total of a large number of individual sub-markets. This paper examines the methodological issues with respect to defining the relevant market involved in studying concentration in the pharmaceutical market in India. Further, we have examined whether the Indian pharmaceutical market is competitive.

Methods

Indian pharmaceutical market was studied using PharmaTrac, the sales audit data from AIOCD-AWACS, that organises formulations into 5 levels of therapeutic classification based on the EphMRA system. The Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) was used as the indicator of market concentration. We calculated HHI for the entire pharmaceutical market studied as a single market as well as at the five different levels of therapeutic classification.

Results and Discussion

Whereas the entire pharmaceutical market taken together as a single market displayed low concentration (HHI = 226.63), it was observed that if each formulation is defined as an individual sub-market, about 69 percent of the total market in terms of market value displayed at least moderate concentration. Market should be defined taking into account the ease of substitutability. Since, patients cannot themselves substitute the formulation prescribed by the doctor with another formulation with the same indication and therapeutic effect, owing to information asymmetry, it is appropriate to study market concentration at the narrower levels of therapeutic classification.

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<![CDATA[Plasma potassium, diuretic use and risk of developing chronic kidney disease in a predominantly White population]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db53ab0ee8fa60bdc9a8

Objective

Both hypokalemia and hyperkalemia are associated with disease progression in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is unclear whether similar associations are present in the general population. Our aim was to examine the association of plasma potassium with risk of developing CKD and the role of diuretics in this association in a population-based cohort.

Research design and methods

We studied 5,130 subjects free of CKD at baseline of the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease (PREVEND) study, a prospective, population-based cohort of Dutch men and women aged 28–75 years. Hypokalemia was defined as plasma potassium <3.5 mmol/L, and hyperkalemia as plasma potassium ≥5.0 mmol/L. Risk of CKD was defined as de novo development of eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and/or albuminuria >30 mg/24h.

Results

Mean baseline plasma potassium was 4.4±0.3 mmol/L. The prevalences of hypokalemia and hyperkalemia were 0.5% and 3.8%, respectively; 3.0% of the subjects used diuretics. During a median follow-up of 10.3 years (interquartile range: 6.3–11.4 years), 753 subjects developed CKD. The potassium-CKD association was modified by diuretic use (Pinteraction = 0.02). Both hypokalemia without (HR, 7.74, 95% CI, 3.43–17.48) or with diuretic use (HR, 4.32, 95% CI, 1.77–10.51) were associated with an increased CKD risk as compared to plasma potassium 4.0–4.4 mmol/L without diuretic use. Plasma potassium concentrations ≥3.5 mmol/L were associated with an increased CKD risk among subjects using diuretics (Ptrend = 0.01) but not among subjects not using diuretics (Ptrend = 0.74).

Conclusion

In this population-based cohort, hypokalemia was associated with an increased CKD risk, regardless of diuretic use. In the absence of hypokalemia, plasma potassium was not associated with an increased CKD risk, except among subjects using diuretics.

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