ResearchPad - fats https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Less physical activity and more varied and disrupted sleep is associated with a less favorable metabolic profile in adolescents]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14699 Sleep and physical activity are modifiable behaviors that play an important role in preventing overweight, obesity, and metabolic health problems. Studies of the association between concurrent objective measures of sleep, physical activity, and metabolic risk factors among adolescents are limited.ObjectiveThe aim of the study was to examine the association between metabolic risk factors and objectively measured school day physical activity and sleep duration, quality, onset, and variability in adolescents.Materials and methodsWe measured one school week of free-living sleep and physical activity with wrist actigraphy in 252 adolescents (146 girls), aged 15.8±0.3 years. Metabolic risk factors included body mass index, waist circumference, total body and trunk fat percentage, resting blood pressure, and fasting glucose and insulin levels. Multiple linear regression adjusted for sex, parental education, and day length was used to assess associations between metabolic risk factors and sleep and activity parameters.ResultsOn average, participants went to bed at 00:22±0.88 hours and slept 6.2±0.7 hours/night, with 0.83±0.36 hours of awakenings/night. However, night-to-night variability in sleep duration was considerable (mean ± interquartile range) 0.75±0.55 hours) and bedtime (0.64±0.53 hours) respectively. Neither average sleep duration nor mean bedtime was associated with any metabolic risk factors. However, greater night-to-night variability in sleep duration and bedtime was associated with higher total body and trunk fat percentage, and less physical activity was associated with higher trunk fat percentage and insulin levels.ConclusionGreater nightly variation in sleep duration and in bedtime and less physical activity were associated with a less favorable metabolic profile in adolescents. These findings support the idea that, along with an adequate amount of physical activity, a regular sleep schedule is important for the metabolic health of adolescents. ]]> <![CDATA[Order of same-day concurrent training influences some indices of power development, but not strength, lean mass, or aerobic fitness in healthy, moderately-active men after 9 weeks of training]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14640 The importance of concurrent exercise order for improving endurance and resistance adaptations remains unclear, particularly when sessions are performed a few hours apart. We investigated the effects of concurrent training (in alternate orders, separated by ~3 hours) on endurance and resistance training adaptations, compared to resistance-only training.Materials and methodsTwenty-nine healthy, moderately-active men (mean ± SD; age 24.5 ± 4.7 y; body mass 74.9 ± 10.8 kg; height 179.7 ± 6.5 cm) performed either resistance-only training (RT, n = 9), or same-day concurrent training whereby high-intensity interval training was performed either 3 hours before (HIIT+RT, n = 10) or after resistance training (RT+HIIT, n = 10), for 3 d.wk-1 over 9 weeks. Training-induced changes in leg press 1-repetition maximal (1-RM) strength, countermovement jump (CMJ) performance, body composition, peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak), aerobic power (W˙peak), and lactate threshold (W˙LT) were assessed before, and after both 5 and 9 weeks of training.ResultsAfter 9 weeks, all training groups increased leg press 1-RM (~24–28%) and total lean mass (~3-4%), with no clear differences between groups. Both concurrent groups elicited similar small-to-moderate improvements in all markers of aerobic fitness (V˙O2peak ~8–9%; W˙LT ~16-20%; W˙peak ~14-15%). RT improved CMJ displacement (mean ± SD, 5.3 ± 6.3%), velocity (2.2 ± 2.7%), force (absolute: 10.1 ± 10.1%), and power (absolute: 9.8 ± 7.6%; relative: 6.0 ± 6.6%). HIIT+RT elicited comparable improvements in CMJ velocity only (2.2 ± 2.7%). Compared to RT, RT+HIIT attenuated CMJ displacement (mean difference ± 90%CI, -5.1 ± 4.3%), force (absolute: -8.2 ± 7.1%) and power (absolute: -6.0 ± 4.7%). Only RT+HIIT reduced absolute fat mass (mean ± SD, -11.0 ± 11.7%).ConclusionsIn moderately-active males, concurrent training, regardless of the exercise order, presents a viable strategy to improve lower-body maximal strength and total lean mass comparably to resistance-only training, whilst also improving indices of aerobic fitness. However, improvements in CMJ displacement, force, and power were attenuated when RT was performed before HIIT, and as such, exercise order may be an important consideration when designing training programs in which the goal is to improve lower-body power. ]]> <![CDATA[Rev-erbα heterozygosity produces a dose-dependent phenotypic advantage in mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14626 Numerous mutational studies have demonstrated that circadian clock proteins regulate behavior and metabolism. Nr1d1(Rev-erbα) is a key regulator of circadian gene expression and a pleiotropic regulator of skeletal muscle homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Loss of Rev-erbα expression induces muscular atrophy, high adiposity, and metabolic syndrome in mice. Here we show that, unlike knockout mice, Nr1d1 heterozygous mice are not susceptible to muscular atrophy and in fact paradoxically possess larger myofiber diameters and improved neuromuscular function, compared to wildtype mice. Heterozygous mice lacked dyslipidemia, a characteristic of Nr1d1 knockout mice and displayed increased whole-body fatty-acid oxidation during periods of inactivity (light cycle). Heterozygous mice also exhibited higher rates of glucose uptake when fasted, and had elevated basal rates of gluconeogenesis compared to wildtype and knockout littermates. Rev-erbα ablation suppressed glycolysis and fatty acid-oxidation in white-adipose tissue (WAT), whereas partial Rev-erbα loss, curiously stimulated these processes. Our investigations revealed that Rev-erbα dose-dependently regulates glucose metabolism and fatty acid oxidation in WAT and muscle.

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<![CDATA[How and why do young soccer players change the Flow State?]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14602 Flow State (FS) as well as other psychological characteristics influence sports performance (SP) and could be relevant according to the playing position in team sports, such as the soccer where players have different specific functions within the team. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in FS dimensions in young soccer players between training time (TR) and official competition time (CM), according to the playing position and, to find relationships between FS dimensions and physical characteristics and academic performance. A total of 141 U16 soccer players were selected (14.7 ± 0.5 years). Data was collected for academic performance, physical and socio-demographic characteristics, and on two occasions, the dimensions of FS (before of a TR and CM). The results showed that the FS dimensions are higher before of the TR than before of the CM (p < 0.05) in all playing positions. In clear goals dimension, forwards showed lower scores than other playing positions, and various dimensions had a positive relationship with academic performance. In conclusion, the FS presented in CM is lower in U16 soccer players compared to that presented in TR. This work has contributed to increasing the knowledge of the fluctuation of the FS that negatively influence the soccer player in pre-competition states and the influence of various factors on this construct.

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<![CDATA[Ablation of <i>Iah1</i>, a candidate gene for diet-induced fatty liver, does not affect liver lipid accumulation in mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14595 Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a pathological condition caused by excess triglyceride deposition in the liver. The SMXA-5 severe fatty liver mouse model has been established from the SM/J and A/J strains. To explore the genetic factors involved in fatty liver development in SMXA-5 mice, we had previously performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis, using (SM/J×SMXA-5)F2 intercross mice, and identified Fl1sa on chromosome 12 (centromere-53.06 Mb) as a significant QTL for fatty liver. Furthermore, isoamyl acetate-hydrolyzing esterase 1 homolog (Iah1) was selected as the most likely candidate gene for Fl1sa. Iah1 gene expression in fatty liver-resistant A/J-12SM mice was significantly higher than in fatty liver-susceptible A/J mice. These data indicated that the Iah1 gene might be associated with fatty liver development. However, the function of murine Iah1 remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, we created Iah1 knockout (KO) mice with two different backgrounds [C57BL/6N (B6) and A/J-12SM (A12)] to investigate the relationship between Iah1 and liver lipid accumulation. Liver triglyceride accumulation in Iah1-KO mice of B6 or A12 background did not differ from their respective Iah1-wild type mice under a high-fat diet. These results indicated that loss of Iah1 did not contribute to fatty liver. On the other hands, adipose tissue dysfunction causes lipid accumulation in ectopic tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, and pancreas). To investigate the effect of Iah1 deficiency on white adipose tissue, we performed DNA microarray analysis of epididymal fat in Iah1-KO mice of A12 background. This result showed that Iah1 deficiency might decrease adipokines Sfrp4 and Metrnl gene expression in epididymal fat. This study demonstrated that Iah1 deficiency did not cause liver lipid accumulation and that Iah1 was not a suitable candidate gene for Fl1sa.

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<![CDATA[A pilot study of ex-vivo MRI-PDFF of donor livers for assessment of steatosis and predicting early graft dysfunction]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14544 The utility of ex vivo Magnetic resonance imaging proton density fat fraction (MRI-PDFF) in donor liver fat quantification is unknown.PurposeTo evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and utility in predicting early allograft dysfunction (EAD) of ex vivo MRI-PDFF measurement of fat in deceased donor livers using histology as the gold standard.MethodsWe performed Ex vivo, 1.5 Tesla MRI-PDFF on 33 human deceased donor livers before implantation, enroute to the operating room. After the exclusion of 4 images (technical errors), 29 MRI images were evaluable. Histology was evaluable in 27 of 29 patients. EAD was defined as a peak value of aminotransferase >2000 IU/mL during the first week or an INR of ≥1.6 or bilirubin ≥10 mg/dL at day 7.ResultsMRI-PDFF values showed a strong positive correlation (Pearson’s correlation coefficient) when histology (macro-steatosis) was included (r = 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.57‐0.89, p<0.0001). The correlation appeared much stronger when macro plus micro-steatosis were included (r = 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.72‐0.94, p<0.0001). EAD was noted in 7(25%) subjects. AUC (Area Under the Curve) for macro steatosis (histology) predicted EAD in 73% (95% CI: 48–99), micro plus macro steatosis in 76% (95% CI: 49–100). AUC for PDFF values predicted EAD in 67(35–98). Comparison of the ROC curves in a multivariate model revealed, adding MRI PDFF values to macro steatosis increased the ability of the model in predicting EAD (AUC: 79%, 95% CI: 59–99), and addition of macro plus micro steatosis based on histology predicted EAD even better (AUC: 90%: 79–100, P = 0.054).ConclusionIn this pilot study, MRI-PDFF imaging showed potential utility in quantifying hepatic steatosis ex-vivo donor liver evaluation and the ability to predict EAD related to severe allograft steatosis in the recipient. ]]> <![CDATA[Added values of DXA-derived visceral adipose tissue to discriminate cardiometabolic risks in pre-pubertal children]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14481 The new generation of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanners provide visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimates by applying different algorithms to the conventional DXA-derived fat parameters such as total fat, trunk fat and android fat for the same image data.ObjectiveThis cross-sectional study aimed to investigate whether VAT estimates from Hologic scanners are better predictors of VAT than conventional DXA parameters in pre-pubertal children, and to explore the discrimination ability of these VAT methods for cardiometabolic risks.MethodsHealthy pre-pubertal children aged 7–10 years were recruited for basic anthropometric, DXA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Laboratory tests included lipid profile, glycaemic tests and blood pressure.ResultsAll VAT methods had acceptable to excellent performance for the diagnosis of dyslipidaemia (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.753–0.837) and hypertensive risk (AUC = 0.710–0.821) in boys, but suboptimal performance for these risks in girls, except for VAT by MRI in the diagnosis of dyslipidaemia. In both sexes, all VAT methods had no or poor discrimination ability for diabetes risk.ConclusionsDXA-derived VAT estimates are very highly correlated with standard methods but has equivalent discrimination abilities compared to the existing DXA-derived fat estimates. ]]> <![CDATA[Newborn body composition after maternal bariatric surgery]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13862 In pregnancy after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), there is increased risk of low birthweight in the offspring. The present study examined how offspring body composition was affected by RYGB.Material and methodsMother-newborn dyads, where the mothers had undergone RYGB were included. Main outcome measure was neonatal body composition. Neonatal body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning (DXA) within 48 hours after birth. In a statistical model offspring born after RYGB were compared with a reference material of offspring and analyses were made to estimate the effect of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, parity, gestational age at birth and newborn sex on newborn body composition. Analyses were made to estimate the impact of maternal weight loss before pregnancy and of other effects of bariatric surgery respectively. The study was performed at a university hospital between October 2012 and December 2013.ResultsWe included 25 mother-newborn dyads where the mothers had undergone RYGB and compared them to a reference material of 311 mother-newborn dyads with comparable pre-pregnancy BMI. Offspring born by mothers after RYGB had lower birthweight (335g, p<0.001), fat-free mass (268g, p<0.001) and fat% (2.8%, p<0.001) compared with reference material. Only 2% of the average reduction in newborn fat free mass could be attributed to maternal pre-pregnancy weight loss whereas other effects of RYGB accounted for 98%. Regarding reduction in fat mass 52% was attributed to weight loss and 47% to other effects of surgery.ConclusionOffspring born after maternal bariatric surgery, had lower birthweight, fat-free mass and fat percentage when compared with a reference material. RYGB itself and not the pre-pregnancy weight loss seems to have had the greatest impact on fetal growth. ]]> <![CDATA[Opposing effects of HNP1 (α-defensin-1) on plasma cholesterol and atherogenesis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Ndf7081dd-c312-4392-aa9c-ddf6cf67dfa0

Atherosclerosis, the predominant cause of death in well-resourced countries, may develop in the presence of plasma lipid levels within the normal range. Inflammation may contribute to lesion development in these individuals, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Transgenic mice expressing α-def-1 released from activated neutrophils develop larger lipid and macrophage-rich lesions in the proximal aortae notwithstanding hypocholesterolemia caused by accelerated clearance of α-def-1/low-density lipoprotein (LDL) complexes from the plasma. The phenotype does not develop when the release of α-def-1 is prevented with colchicine. However, ApoE-/- mice crossed with α-def-1 mice or given exogenous α-def-1 develop smaller aortic lesions associated with reduced plasma cholesterol, suggesting a protective effect of accelerated LDL clearance. Experiments were performed to address this seeming paradox and to determine if α-def-1 might provide a means to lower cholesterol and thereby attenuate atherogenesis. We confirmed that exposing ApoE-/- mice to α-def-1 lowers total plasma cholesterol and decreases lesion size. However, lesion size was larger than in mice with total plasma cholesterol lowered to the same extent by inhibiting its adsorption or by ingesting a low-fat diet. Furthermore, α-def-1 levels correlated independently with lesion size in ApoE-/- mice. These studies show that α-def-1 has competing effects on atherogenesis. Although α-def-1 accelerates LDL clearance from plasma, it also stimulates deposition and retention of LDL in the vasculature, which may contribute to development of atherosclerosis in individuals with normal or even low plasma levels of cholesterol. Inhibiting α-def-1 may attenuate the impact of chronic inflammation on atherosclerotic vascular disease.

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<![CDATA[Association between hair cortisol concentration and dietary intake among normal weight preschool children predisposed to overweight and obesity]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8c1946d5eed0c484b4d32e

Background

The association between chronically elevated cortisol, as measured by hair cortisol concentration (HCC), and dietary intake among children has generally not been explored. Moreover, it is unknown whether there is an association between parental HCC and dietary intake among their children.

Objective

To examine associations between HCC and dietary intake among children, and to explore the association between parental HCC and dietary intake among their children.

Methods

We conducted a cross-sectional study based on 296 children predisposed to overweight and obesity who participated in the Healthy Start study. Multiple Linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between HCC and total energy intake, macronutrients, fruit and vegetables, added sugar, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), and a diet quality index (DQI).

Results

Among the children, we found that higher HCC was associated with a lower consumption of dietary fat (β: -0.7 g/day [95% CI: -1.3, -0.0] per 100 pg/mg HCC). We found no statistically significant association between HCC and intake of total energy, protein, carbohydrate, fruit and vegetables, added sugar, SSB or DQI. We found no association between parental HCC and intake of total energy, added sugar, selected food groups or DQI among their children. However, stratified analyses showed that paternal HCC was associated with a borderline significant lower total energy intake and significantly lower protein intake, but only among daughters (adjusted β: -42 kcal/day [95% CI: -85, 0] and -2.6 g/day [95% CI: -4.4, -0.8] per 100 pg/mg HCC, respectively).

Conclusion

Among children, chronic stress as measured by HCC may be associated with a lower fat consumption, and paternal HCC may be associated with a lower intake of energy and protein among their daughters. However, the associations observed were weak, and any clinical relevance of these findings remains questionable.

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<![CDATA[Effects of increased space allowance on animal welfare, meat and ham quality of heavy pigs slaughtered at 160Kg]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c706779d5eed0c4847c70a2

Sixty barrows (Body Weight–BW- range: 23.9–160 kg) were allotted to two experimental groups (6 pens of 5 pigs each): the control group was kept at a space allowance of 1m2/head; the second group was kept at 1.3m2/head. Behaviour, growth parameters, carcass and meat quality were assessed, as well as fat and cured ham quality. Results showed that pigs raised at 1.3m2/head spent more time laying (particularly in lateral recumbency, P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively) compared to pigs kept at lower space allowance. They also reduced the aimless exploration of the slatted pen floor (P<0.001) and increased overall expression of other, mainly active, behaviors (e.g., drinking, walking and standing, P<0.01). Pigs raised at 1.3m2/head showed higher final BW (P = 0.02), more favourable Average Daily Gain (ADG) and gain-to-Feed ratio (G:F) both during the last period of the trial (P<0.05 for both parameters) and over the entire trial (P = 0.01 for both parameters). No significant difference was observed between groups for carcass traits and the main meat quality attributes. Subcutaneous fat from green hams had higher α-linolenic acid content (P<0.01) in the group reared at greater space allowance. Green hams from this group lost less weight at trimming (P<0.01) and the resulting cured hams received better sensory evaluations (P<0.05). No difference was observed in fatty acid composition and unsaturation levels of the subcutaneous fat from cured hams. Our data suggest that heavy pigs intended for Parma ham would benefit from the adoption of higher individual floor space allowances, both in terms of animal welfare (increased possibility to rest) and of productive parameters, without having any detrimental effect on the suitability of the thighs for dry-curing or on the quality of the final product.

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<![CDATA[Genetic redundancy fuels polygenic adaptation in Drosophila]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c61e8f6d5eed0c48496f4fd

The genetic architecture of adaptive traits is of key importance to predict evolutionary responses. Most adaptive traits are polygenic—i.e., result from selection on a large number of genetic loci—but most molecularly characterized traits have a simple genetic basis. This discrepancy is best explained by the difficulty in detecting small allele frequency changes (AFCs) across many contributing loci. To resolve this, we use laboratory natural selection to detect signatures for selective sweeps and polygenic adaptation. We exposed 10 replicates of a Drosophila simulans population to a new temperature regime and uncovered a polygenic architecture of an adaptive trait with high genetic redundancy among beneficial alleles. We observed convergent responses for several phenotypes—e.g., fitness, metabolic rate, and fat content—and a strong polygenic response (99 selected alleles; mean s = 0.059). However, each of these selected alleles increased in frequency only in a subset of the evolving replicates. We discerned different evolutionary paradigms based on the heterogeneous genomic patterns among replicates. Redundancy and quantitative trait (QT) paradigms fitted the experimental data better than simulations assuming independent selective sweeps. Our results show that natural D. simulans populations harbor a vast reservoir of adaptive variation facilitating rapid evolutionary responses using multiple alternative genetic pathways converging at a new phenotypic optimum. This key property of beneficial alleles requires the modification of testing strategies in natural populations beyond the search for convergence on the molecular level.

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<![CDATA[The associations of fat tissue and muscle mass indices with all-cause mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dc9bbd5eed0c48452a0c8

Protein-energy wasting, which involves loss of fat and muscle mass, is prevalent and is associated with mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We investigated the associations of fat tissue and muscle mass indices with all-cause mortality in HD patients. The study included 162 patients undergoing HD. The fat tissue index (FTI) and skeletal muscle mass index (SMI), which represent respective tissue masses normalized to height squared, were measured by bioimpedance analysis after dialysis. Patients were divided into the following four groups according to the medians of FTI and SMI values: group 1 (G1), lower FTI and lower SMI; G2, higher FTI and lower SMI; G3, lower FTI and higher SMI; and G4, higher FTI and higher SMI. The associations of the FTI, SMI, and body mass index (BMI) with all-cause mortality were evaluated. During a median follow-up of 2.5 years, 29 patients died. The 5-year survival rates were 48.6%, 76.1%, 95.7%, and 87.4% in the G1, G2, G3, and G4 groups, respectively (P = 0.0002). The adjusted hazard ratio values were 0.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10–0.95, P = 0.040) for G2 vs. G1, 0.13 (95%CI 0.01–0.69, P = 0.013) for G3 vs. G1, and 0.25 (95%CI 0.07–0.72, P = 0.0092) for G4 vs. G1, respectively. With regard to model discrimination, on adding both FTI and SMI to a model with established risk factors, the C-index increased significantly when compared with the value for a model with BMI (0.763 vs. 0.740, P = 0.016). Higher FTI and/or higher SMI values were independently associated with reduced risks of all-cause mortality in HD patients. Moreover, the combination of the FTI and SMI may more accurately predict all-cause mortality when compared with BMI. Therefore, these body composition indicators should be evaluated simultaneously in this population.

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<![CDATA[Association between social jetlag food consumption and meal times in patients with obesity-related chronic diseases]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6c75d4d5eed0c4843d0285

Chronic disruption of the synchronous relationship between endogenous and exogenous circadian timing is associated with the development of obesity and metabolic disease. Social jetlag is a measure of circadian misalignment and has been identified as a risk factor for overweight and related diseases. However, the mechanisms involved in this relationship remain underexplored. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between social jetlag and food consumption at late meal timing in patients with obesity-related chronic diseases. This study included 792 individuals (73% female; age 55.9 ± 12.4 years) in which the prevalence of social jetlag (>1h) was 24.4% (n = 194). Participants with social jetlag reported late meal timing for breakfast, early afternoon snack and dinner. Individuals with social jetlag also reported a higher intake of total calories (kcal), protein, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and servings of meat and eggs and sweets in relation to those without social jetlag. Regarding the consumption during each meal of the day, participants with social jetlag had consumed more calories, saturated fat and cholesterol during dinner; more protein, total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol during lunch; and more total fat and saturated fat during morning snack. In addition, individuals with social jetlag had a higher risk of inadequate consumption of total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol intake when compared with those without social jetlag. We conclude that social jetlag is associated with a poor diet and later meal times, which should be avoided in individuals with obesity-related chronic diseases. More studies are needed to confirm these findings.

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<![CDATA[Control of basal autophagy rate by vacuolar peduncle]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c67309ed5eed0c484f37df3

Basal autophagy is as a compressive catabolic mechanism engaged in the breakdown of damaged macromolecules and organelles leading to the recycling of elementary nutrients. Thought essential to cellular refreshing, little is known about the origin of a constitutional rate of basal autophagy. Here, we found that loss of Drosophila vacuolar peduncle (vap), a presumed GAP enzyme, is associated with enhanced basal autophagy rate and physiological alterations resulting in a wasteful cell energy balance, a hallmark of overactive autophagy. By contrast, starvation-induced autophagy was disrupted in vap mutant conditions, leading to a block of maturation into autolysosomes. This phenotype stem for exacerbated biogenesis of PI(3)P-dependent endomembranes, including autophagosome membranes and ectopic fusions of vesicles. These findings shed new light on the neurodegenerative phenotype found associated to mutant vap adult brains in a former study. A partner of Vap, Sprint (Spri), acting as an endocytic GEF for Rab5, had the converse effect of leading to a reduction in PI(3)P-dependent endomembrane formation in mutants. Spri was conditional to normal basal autophagy and instrumental to the starvation-sensitivity phenotype specific of vap. Rab5 activity itself was essential for PI(3)P and for pre-autophagosome structures formation. We propose that Vap/Spri complexes promote a cell surface-derived flow of endocytic Rab5-containing vesicles, the traffic of which is crucial for the implementation of a basal autophagy rate.

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<![CDATA[Early girl is a novel component of the Fat signaling pathway]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b52c2d5eed0c4842bcfaa

The Drosophila protocadherins Dachsous and Fat regulate growth and tissue polarity by modulating the levels, membrane localization and polarity of the atypical myosin Dachs. Localization to the apical junctional membrane is critical for Dachs function, and the adapter protein Vamana/Dlish and palmitoyl transferase Approximated are required for Dachs membrane localization. However, how Dachs levels are regulated is poorly understood. Here we identify the early girl gene as playing an essential role in Fat signaling by limiting the levels of Dachs protein. early girl mutants display overgrowth of the wings and reduced cross vein spacing, hallmark features of mutations affecting Fat signaling. Genetic experiments reveal that it functions in parallel with Fat to regulate Dachs. early girl encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase, physically interacts with Dachs, and regulates its protein stability. Concomitant loss of early girl and approximated results in accumulation of Dachs and Vamana in cytoplasmic punctae, suggesting that it also regulates their trafficking to the apical membrane. Our findings establish a crucial role for early girl in Fat signaling, involving regulation of Dachs and Vamana, two key downstream effectors of this pathway.

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<![CDATA[Balancing selection at a premature stop mutation in the myostatin gene underlies a recessive leg weakness syndrome in pigs]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b52bfd5eed0c4842bcf6f

Balancing selection provides a plausible explanation for the maintenance of deleterious alleles at moderate frequency in livestock, including lethal recessives exhibiting heterozygous advantage in carriers. In the current study, a leg weakness syndrome causing mortality of piglets in a commercial line showed monogenic recessive inheritance, and a region on chromosome 15 associated with the syndrome was identified by homozygosity mapping. Whole genome resequencing of cases and controls identified a mutation causing a premature stop codon within exon 3 of the porcine Myostatin (MSTN) gene, similar to those causing a double-muscling phenotype observed in several mammalian species. The MSTN mutation was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the population at birth, but significantly distorted amongst animals still in the herd at 110 kg, due to an absence of homozygous mutant genotypes. In heterozygous form, the MSTN mutation was associated with a major increase in muscle depth and decrease in fat depth, suggesting that the deleterious allele was maintained at moderate frequency due to heterozygous advantage (allele frequency, q = 0.22). Knockout of the porcine MSTN by gene editing has previously been linked to problems of low piglet survival and lameness. This MSTN mutation is an example of putative balancing selection in livestock, providing a plausible explanation for the lack of disrupting MSTN mutations in pigs despite many generations of selection for lean growth.

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<![CDATA[Protein fortification with mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L.) powder: Effect on textural, microbiological, nutritional and sensory features of bread]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5df30cd5eed0c484580bee

In the present study, inclusion of mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L.) powder into bread doughs at 5 and 10% substitution level of soft wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) flour was tested to produce protein fortified breads. The addition of mealworm powder (MP) did not negatively affect the technological features of either doughs or breads. All the tested doughs showed the same leavening ability, whereas breads containing 5% MP showed the highest specific volume and the lowest firmness. An enrichment in protein content was observed in experimental breads where the highest values for this parameter were recorded in breads containing 10% MP. Breads fortified with 10% MP also exhibited a significant increase in the content of free amino acids, and especially in the following essential amino acids: tyrosine, methionine, isoleucine, and leucine. By contrast, no differences in nutritional quality of lipids were seen between fortified and control breads. Results of sensory analyses revealed that protein fortification of bread with MP significantly affected bread texture and overall liking, as well as crust colour, depending on the substitution level. Overall, proof of concept was provided for the inclusion of MP into bread doughs started with different leavening agents (sourdough and/or baker’s yeast), at 5 or 10% substitution level of soft wheat flour. Based on the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale, the proposed bread making technology can be situated at level 4 (validation in laboratory environment), thus suggesting that the production of breads with MP might easily be scaled up at industrial level. However, potential spoilage and safety issues that need to be further considered were highlighted.

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<![CDATA[Body composition and adipokines changes after initial treatment with darunavir-ritonavir plus either raltegravir or tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-emtricitabine: A substudy of the NEAT001/ANRS143 randomised trial]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c58d657d5eed0c484031c10

Background

Comparison of changes in body composition, adipokines and inflammatory markers after initial therapy with a nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (N(t)RTI)- sparing or containing regimen are scarce.

Design

Randomised Clinical Trial.

Methods

This is the body composition substudy of NEAT 001/ANRS 143, a randomised trial comparing darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r) plus either raltegravir (RAL) or tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) in 805 ART naïve HIV-infected adults. The primary endpoint was percentage change in limb fat at week 96. Secondary endpoints were associations among these changes and metabolic markers (IL-6, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, FGF-23).

Results

126 subjects (61 DRV/r + RAL and 65 DRV/r + TDF/FTC) were included. The rate of change in BMI between groups for RAL versus TDF/FTC at week 96 was 1.5% per 48-week period (p = 0.015). The rate of change in limb fat mass, trunk fat mass, total body fat and total lean mass was for RAL versus TDF/FTC at week 96 was 2.5% (p = 0.38), 7.3% ((p = 0.021), 4.9% (p = 0.061) and 1.3% (p = 0.12) respectively. Baseline insulin and leptin levels were correlated with baseline limb fat and trunk fat mass [r = 0.31 (p = 0.0043)/r = 0.28 (p = 0.0011) for limb fat, and r = 0.63 (p<0.0001)/r = 0.50(p<0.0001) for trunk fat]. After adjustment, a 10% faster increase in leptin between baseline and week 48 was associated with a more rapid increase in limb fat at week 48 (0.5% per 48 weeks, p<0.001), total body fat mass (0.6% per 48 weeks, p<0.001), and trunk fat mass (0.3% per 48 weeks, p = 0.0026).

Conclusions

After week 96 a N(t)RTI sparing regimen of DRV/r + RAL produced a numerically greater percentage increase in body composition variables with only change in trunk fat mass and BMI being significant.

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<![CDATA[Resilient hepatic mitochondrial function and lack of iNOS dependence in diet-induced insulin resistance]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c61e8b8d5eed0c48496f037

Obesity-derived inflammation and metabolic dysfunction has been related to the activity of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). To understand the interrelation between metabolism, obesity and NO., we evaluated the effects of obesity-induced NO. signaling on liver mitochondrial function. We used mouse strains containing mitochondrial nicotinamide transhydrogenase activity, while prior studies involved a spontaneous mutant of this enzyme, and are, therefore, more prone to oxidative imbalance. Wild-type and iNOS knockout mice were fed a high fat diet for 2, 4 or 8 weeks. iNOS knockout did not protect against diet-induced metabolic changes. However, the diet decreased fatty-acid oxidation capacity in liver mitochondria at 4 weeks in both wild-type and knockout groups; this was recovered at 8 weeks. Interestingly, other mitochondrial functional parameters were unchanged, despite significant modifications in insulin resistance in wild type and iNOS knockout animals. Overall, we found two surprising features of obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction: (i) iNOS does not have an essential role in obesity-induced insulin resistance under all experimental conditions and (ii) liver mitochondria are resilient to functional changes in obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction.

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