ResearchPad - food-and-nutrition-of-indigenous-peoples https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Resetting the Narrative in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nutrition Research]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_10006 As the oldest continuous living civilizations in the world, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have strength, tenacity, and resilience. Initial colonization of the landscape included violent dispossession and removal of people from Country to expand European land tenure and production systems, loss of knowledge holders through frontier violence, and formal government policies of segregation and assimilation designed to destroy ontological relationships with Country and kin. The ongoing manifestations of colonialism continue to affect food systems and food knowledges of Aboriginal peoples, and have led to severe health inequities and disproportionate rates of nutrition-related health conditions. There is an urgent need to collaborate with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to address nutrition and its underlying determinants in a way that integrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ understandings of food and food systems, health, healing, and well-being. We use the existing literature to discuss current ways that Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are portrayed in the literature in relation to nutrition, identify knowledge gaps that require further research, and propose a new way forward.

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<![CDATA[Healthy Stores Initiative Associated with Produce Purchasing on Navajo Nation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N05aaebc3-822b-4931-8b08-9f30c657cf74

ABSTRACT

Background

American Indians and Alaska Natives experience diet-related health disparities compared with non-Hispanic whites. Navajo Nation's colonial history and remote setting present unique challenges for healthy food access.

Objective

This study aims to understand the impact of the Healthy Navajo Stores Initiative (HNSI) on fruit and vegetable purchasing on Navajo Nation.

Methods

We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 692 customers shopping at 28 convenience stores, trading posts, and grocery stores on Navajo Nation. Individual- and household-level sociodemographic data and food purchasing behaviors were collected. Descriptive and bivariate analyses for customers’ individual- and household-level characteristics were conducted using chi-squared tests. The impact of individual-, household-, and store-level factors on fruit and vegetable purchasing was assessed using multiple logistic regression modeling.

Results

Store participation in the HNSI was significantly associated with customers’ purchase of produce. Customers experienced 150% higher odds of purchasing produce if they shopped in participating stores, compared with nonparticipating stores (P < 0.001). Store type was strongly associated with customers’ purchase of fruits or vegetables. Customers shopping at a grocery store had 520% higher odds of purchasing produce than did customers shopping at convenience stores (P < 0.001). Customers shopping at trading posts had 120% higher odds of purchasing fruits or vegetables than did customers shopping at convenience stores (P = 0.001).

Conclusions

Our findings reveal increased produce purchasing at stores participating in the HNSI. Customers were significantly more likely to purchase fruits or vegetables in stores enrolled in a healthy store intervention than in nonenrolled stores, after controlling for quantity of produce stocked and store type. Customers shopping in grocery stores and trading posts were significantly more likely to purchase produce than customers shopping in convenience stores. These findings have implications for food access in rural tribal communities.

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