ResearchPad - gluten https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[SNP markers for low molecular glutenin subunits (LMW-GSs) at the <i>Glu-A3</i> and <i>Glu-B3</i> loci in bread wheat]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13817 The content and composition of seed storage proteins is largely responsible for wheat end-use quality. They mainly consist of polymeric glutenins and monomeric gliadins. According to their electrophoretic mobility, gliadins and glutenins are subdivided into several fractions. Glutenins are classified as high molecular weight or low molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs and LMW-GSs, respectively). LMW-GSs are encoded by multigene families located at the orthologous Glu-3 loci. We designed a set of 16 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers that are able to detect SDS-PAGE alleles at the Glu-A3 and Glu-B3 loci. The SNP markers captured the diversity of alleles in 88 international reference lines and 27 Mexican cultivars, when compared to SDS-PAGE and STS markers, however, showed a slightly larger percent of multiple alleles, mainly for Glu-B3. SNP markers were then used to determine the Glu-1 and Glu-3 allele composition in 54 CIMMYT historical lines and demonstrated to be useful tool for breeding programs to improve wheat end product properties.

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<![CDATA[Analysis of genetic control and QTL mapping of essential wheat grain quality traits in a recombinant inbred population]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c897730d5eed0c4847d2663

Wheat cultivars are genetically crossed to improve end-use quality for traits as per demands of baking industry and broad consumer preferences. The processing and baking qualities of bread wheat are influenced by a variety of genetic make-ups, environmental factors and their interactions. Two wheat cultivars, WL711 and C306, derived recombinant inbred lines (RILs) with a population of 206, were used for phenotyping of quality-related traits. The genetic analysis of quality traits showed considerable variation for measurable quality traits, with normal distribution and transgressive segregation across the years. From the 206 RILs, few RILs were found to be superior to those of the parental cultivars for key quality traits, indicating their potential use for the improvement of end-use quality and suggesting the probability of finding new alleles and allelic combinations from the RIL population. Mapping analysis identified 38 putative QTLs for 13 quality-related traits, with QTLs explaining 7.9–16.8% phenotypic variation spanning over 14 chromosomes, i.e., 1A, 1B, 1D, 2A, 2D, 3B, 3D, 4A, 4B, 4D, 5D, 6A, 7A and 7B. In-silico analysis based on homology to the annotated wheat genes present in database, identified six putative candidate genes within QTL for total grain protein content, qGPC.1B.1 region. Major QTL regions for other quality traits such as TKW have been identified on 1B, 2A, and 7A chromosomes in the studied RIL population. This study revealed the importance of the combination of stable QTLs with region-specific QTLs for better phenotyping, and the QTLs presented in our study will be useful for the improvement of wheat grain and bread-making quality.

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<![CDATA[Intake of citrus fruits and vegetables and the intensity of defecation urgency syndrome among gynecological cancer survivors]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c3667fbd5eed0c4841a6c23

Background

Despite the experimental evidence that certain dietary compounds lower the risk of radiation-induced damage to the intestine, clinical data are missing and dietary advice to irradiated patients is not evidence-based.

Materials and methods

We have previously identified 28 intestinal health-related symptoms among 623 gynaecological-cancer survivors (three to fifteen years after radiotherapy) and 344 matched population-based controls. The 28 symptoms were grouped into five radiation-induced survivorship syndromes: defecation-urgency syndrome, fecal-leakage syndrome, excessive mucus discharge, excessive gas discharge and blood discharge. The grouping was based on factor scores produced by Exploratory Factor Analysis in combination with the Variable Cutoff Method. Frequency of food intake was measured by a questionnaire. We evaluated the relationship between dietary intake and the intensity of the five syndromes.

Results

With the exception of excessive mucus discharge, the intensity of all syndromes declined with increasing intake of citrus fruits. The intensity of defecation-urgency and fecal-leakage syndrome declined with combined intake of vegetables and citrus fruits. The intensity of excessive mucus discharge was increased with increasing intake of gluten.

Conclusion

In this observational study, we found an association between a high intake of citrus fruits and vegetables and a lower intensity of the studied radiation-induced cancer survivorship syndromes. Our data suggest it may be worthwhile to continue to search for a role of the diet before, during and after radiotherapy to help the cancer survivor restore her or his intestinal health after irradiation.

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<![CDATA[A viral trigger for celiac disease]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c0e98c5d5eed0c484eab17c ]]> <![CDATA[Effective Identification of Low-Gliadin Wheat Lines by Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS): Implications for the Development and Analysis of Foodstuffs Suitable for Celiac Patients]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dadcab0ee8fa60bba440

Scope

The aim of this work was to assess the ability of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to distinguish wheat lines with low gliadin content, obtained by RNA interference (RNAi), from non-transgenic wheat lines. The discriminant analysis was performed using both whole grain and flour. The transgenic sample set included 409 samples for whole grain sorting and 414 samples for flour experiments, while the non-transgenic set consisted of 126 and 156 samples for whole grain and flour, respectively.

Methods and Results

Samples were scanned using a Foss-NIR Systems 6500 System II instrument. Discrimination models were developed using the entire spectral range (400–2500 nm) and ranges of 400–780 nm, 800–1098 nm and 1100–2500 nm, followed by analysis of means of partial least square (PLS). Two external validations were made, using samples from the years 2013 and 2014 and a minimum of 99% of the flour samples and 96% of the whole grain samples were classified correctly.

Conclusions

The results demonstrate the ability of NIRS to successfully discriminate between wheat samples with low-gliadin content and wild types. These findings are important for the development and analysis of foodstuff for celiac disease (CD) patients to achieve better dietary composition and a reduction in disease incidence.

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<![CDATA[Chromosome Specific Substitution Lines of Aegilops geniculata Alter Parameters of Bread Making Quality of Wheat]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db1aab0ee8fa60bce0ac

Wheat cultivars with wide introgression have strongly impacted global wheat production. Aegilops geniculata (MgUg) is an important wild relative with several useful traits that can be exploited for wheat improvement. Screening of Ae. geniculata addition lines indicated a negative effect of 1Ug and the positive effect of 1Mg chromosome on wheat dough strength. Negative effect of 1Ug is probably associated with variation in number and position of the tripeptide repeat motif in the high molecular weight glutenin (HMW-G) gene. To utilize the positive potential of 1Mg chromosome, three disomic substitution lines (DSLs) 1Mg(1A), 1Mg(1B) and 1Mg(1D) were created. These lines were characterized for morphological, cytogenetic properties and biochemical signatures using FISH, 1D-, 2D-PAGE and RP-HPLC. Contribution of wheat 1A, 1B and 1D chromosomes towards dough mixing and baking parameters, chapatti quality, Fe/Zn content and glume color were identified. Observed order of variation in the dough mixing and baking parameters {1Mg(1D) ≤wheat ≤1Mg(1B) ≤1Mg(1A)} indicated that chromosome specific introgression is desirable for best utilization of wild species’ potential.

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<![CDATA[Younger age at diagnosis predisposes to mucosal recovery in celiac disease on a gluten-free diet: A meta-analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5ab17aff463d7e5a4453bc22

Background and aims

Persistent intestinal damage is associated with higher complication rates in celiac disease. We aimed to assess the potential modifiers of mucosal recovery.

Materials and methods

We screened databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Trials, and Web of Science) for papers on celiac disease. Papers discussing (1) celiac patients (2) follow-up biopsy and (3) mucosal recovery after commencement of a gluten-free diet were included. The primary outcome was to produce a comprehensive analysis of complete mucosal recovery (i.e., Marsh 0 on follow-up). We compared children’s recovery ratios to those of adults. Patients following a strict gluten-free dietary regimen were included in a subgroup. Summary point estimates, 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and 95% predictive intervals (PIs) were calculated. Heterogeneity was tested with I2-statistic. The PROSPERO registration number is CRD42016053482.

Results

The overall complete mucosal recovery ratio, calculated from 37 observational studies, was 0.36 (CI: 0.28–0.44, PI: -0.12–0.84; I2: 98.4%, p<0.01). Children showed higher complete mucosal recovery ratio than adults (p<0.01): 0.65 (CI: 0.44–0.85, PI: -0.10–1.39; I2: 96.5%, p<0.01) as opposed to 0.24 (CI: 0.15–0.33, PI: -0.19–1.08; I2: 96.3%, p<0.01). In the strict dietary adherence subgroup, complete mucosal recovery ratio was 0.47 (CI: 0.24–0.70, PI: -0.47–1.41; I2: 98.8%, p<0.001). On meta-regression, diagnostic villous atrophy (Marsh 3) ratio (-8.97, p<0.01) and male ratio (+6.04, p<0.01) proved to be a significant determinant of complete mucosal recovery, unlike duration of gluten-free diet (+0.01, p = 0.62). The correlation between complete mucosal recovery ratio and age on diagnosis is of borderline significance (-0.03, p = 0.05).

Conclusions

There is considerable heterogeneity across studies concerning complete mucosal recovery ratios achieved by a gluten-free diet in celiac disease. Several celiac patients fail to achieve complete mucosal recovery even if a strict dietary regimen is followed. Younger age on diagnosis, less severe initial histologic damage and male gender predispose for achieving mucosal recovery.

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<![CDATA[Corn gluten meal induces enteritis and decreases intestinal immunity and antioxidant capacity in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) at high supplementation levels]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c92b385d5eed0c4843a420d

Corn gluten meal (CGM) is an important alternative protein source in aquafeed production. However, in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), CGM could not be effectively utilized because of its low digestibility, the reason for which is still unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and elucidate the cause for the poor utilization of CGM by turbot from the view of gut health. An 8-week feeding trial was conducted with turbot individuals (initial body weight 11.4 ± 0.2 g), which were fed with one of four isonitrogenous and isolipidic diets formulated to include 0%, 21.2%, 31.8%, and 42.6% CGM to progressively replace 0%, 33%, 50%, and 67% fish meal (FM) protein in a FM-based diet, respectively. The results showed that CGM caused dose-dependent decreases in (1) growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and feed utilization; (2) activities of brush-border membrane enzymes; (3) intestinal antioxidant indices of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase activities, and reduced glutathione level; (4) intestinal immune parameters of acid phosphatase activity, complement 3, complement 4, and IgM concentrations. Dose-dependent increases in the severity of the inflammation, with concomitant alterations on microvilli structure and increasing expression of inflammatory cytokine genes of Il-1β, Il-8, and Tnf-α were observed but without a change in the intracellular junctions and the epithelial permeability established by the plasma diamine oxidase activity and D-lactate level examinations. In conclusion, the present work proved that CGM negatively affected the gut health of turbot by inducing enteritis and by decreasing intestinal immunity and antioxidant capacity, which could be one of the reasons for the reduced utilization of CGM by turbot.

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<![CDATA[Non-Invasive Detection of Protein Content in Several Types of Plant Feed Materials Using a Hybrid Near Infrared Spectroscopy Model]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da0cab0ee8fa60b780d7

Near-infrared spectroscopy combined with chemometrics was applied to construct a hybrid model for the non-invasive detection of protein content in different types of plant feed materials. In total, 829 samples of plant feed materials, which included corn distillers’ dried grains with solubles (DDGS), corn germ meal, corn gluten meal, distillers’ dried grains (DDG) and rapeseed meal, were collected from markets in China. Based on the different preprocessed spectral data, specific models for each type of plant feed material and a hybrid model for all the materials were built. Performances of specific model and hybrid model constructed with full spectrum (full spectrum model) and selected wavenumbers with VIP (variable importance in the projection) scores value bigger than 1.00 (VIP scores model) were also compared. The best spectral preprocessing method for this study was found to be the standard normal variate transformation combined with the first derivative. For both full spectrum and VIP scores model, the prediction performance of the hybrid model was slightly worse than those of the specific models but was nevertheless satisfactory. Moreover, the VIP scores model obtained generally better performances than corresponding full spectrum model. Wavenumbers around 4500 cm-1, 4664 cm-1 and 4836 cm-1 were found to be the key wavenumbers in modeling protein content in these plant feed materials. The values for the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and the relative prediction deviation (RPD) obtained with the VIP scores hybrid model were 1.05% and 2.53 for corn DDGS, 0.98% and 4.17 for corn germ meal, 0.75% and 6.99 for corn gluten meal, 1.54% and 4.59 for DDG, and 0.90% and 3.33 for rapeseed meal, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate that the protein content in several types of plant feed materials can be determined using a hybrid near-infrared spectroscopy model. And VIP scores method can be used to improve the general predictability of hybrid model.

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<![CDATA[Consumer Preferences for Written and Oral Information about Allergens When Eating Out]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da11ab0ee8fa60b798c4

Background

Avoiding food allergens when eating outside the home presents particular difficulties for food allergic (FA) and intolerant (FI) consumers and a lack of allergen information in restaurants and takeaways causes unnecessary restrictions. Across Europe, legislation effective from December 2014, aims to improve allergen information by requiring providers of non-prepacked foods to supply information related to allergen content within their foods.

Methods

Using in-depth interviews with 60 FA/FI adults and 15 parents/carers of FA/FI children, we aimed to identify FA/FI consumers’ preferences for written and/or verbal allergen information when eating out or ordering takeaway food.

Results

A complex and dynamic set of preferences and practices for written and verbal allergen information was identified. Overwhelmingly, written information was favoured in the first instance, but credible personal/verbal communication was highly valued and essential to a good eating out experience. Adequate written information facilitated implicit trust in subsequent verbal information. Where written information was limited, FA/FIs depended on social cues to assess the reliability of verbal information resources, and defaulted to tried and tested allergen avoidance strategies when these were deemed unreliable.

Conclusion

Understanding the subtle negotiations and difficulties encountered by FA/FIs when eating out can serve as a guide for legislators and food providers; by encouraging provision of clear written and verbal allergen information, and training of proactive, allergen-aware staff. This, in tandem with legal requirements for allergen information provision, paves the way for FA/FIs to feel more confident in eating out choices; and to experience improved eating out experiences.

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<![CDATA[Impact of Gluten-Friendly Bread on the Metabolism and Function of In Vitro Gut Microbiota in Healthy Human and Coeliac Subjects]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da9aab0ee8fa60ba37e0

The main aim of this paper was to assess the in vitro response of healthy and coeliac human faecal microbiota to gluten-friendly bread (GFB). Thus, GFB and control bread (CB) were fermented with faecal microbiota in pH-controlled batch cultures. The effects on the major groups of microbiota were monitored over 48 h incubations by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Furthermore, the death kinetics of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella Typhimurium in a saline solution supplemented with GFB or CB were also assessed. The experiments in saline solution pinpointed that GFB prolonged the survival of L. acidophilus and exerted an antibacterial effect towards S. aureus and S. Typhimurium. Moreover, GFB modulated the intestinal microbiota in vitro, promoting changes in lactobacilli and bifidobacteria members in coeliac subjects. A final multivariate approach combining both viable counts and metabolites suggested that GFB could beneficially modulate the coeliac gut microbiome; however, human studies are needed to prove its efficacy.

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<![CDATA[The composition of T cell subtypes in duodenal biopsies are altered in coeliac disease patients]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4fab0ee8fa60bdb964

One of the hallmarks of Celiac disease (CD) is intraepithelial lymphocytosis in the small intestine. Until now, investigations to characterize the T cell subpopulations within the epithelial layer have not discriminated between the heterodimeric co-receptor molecule, CD8αβ, and the possibly immunoregulatory CD8αα homodimer molecule. Besides TCRαβ+ CD4+ cells, no other phenotypes have been shown to be gluten-reactive. Using flow cytometry on lymphocytes from duodenal biopsies, we determined that the number of B cells (CD3- CD19+) and the number of CD3+ CD4- CD8- double-negative (DN) T cells were elevated 6–7 fold in children with CD. We next isolated and quantified intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) from biopsies obtained from patients (both children and adults) with CD, potential CD and non-CD controls. Flow cytometric analysis of the duodenal T cell subpopulations was performed including the markers TCRαβ, TCRγδ, CD4, CD8α and CD8β. Proportions of γδ T cells and CD8αβ+ cells among IELs were increased in CD patients, whereas proportions of CD4+ CD8αα+ and CD4+ single-positive T cells were decreased. Additionally, two gluten-reactive T cell lines (TCLs) derived from CD biopsies were analyzed for changes in proportions of T cell subsets before and after gluten stimulation. In a proliferation assay, dividing cells were tracked with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE), and both αβ and γδ T cells proliferated in response to gluten. Changes in duodenal T cell subpopulations in potential CD patients followed the same pattern as for CD patients, but with less pronounced effect.

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<![CDATA[Modulating the Gut Microbiota Improves Glucose Tolerance, Lipoprotein Profile and Atherosclerotic Plaque Development in ApoE-Deficient Mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dad6ab0ee8fa60bb7fd8

The importance of the gut microbiota (GM) in disease development has recently received increased attention, and numerous approaches have been made to better understand this important interplay. For example, metabolites derived from the GM have been shown to promote atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and to increase CVD risk factors. Popular interest in the role of the intestine in a variety of disease states has now resulted in a significant proportion of individuals without coeliac disease switching to gluten-free diets. The effect of gluten-free diets on atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk factors is largely unknown. We therefore investigated the effect of a gluten-free high-fat cholesterol-rich diet, as compared to the same diet in which the gluten peptide gliadin had been added back, on atherosclerosis and several cardiovascular risk factors in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe-/-) mice. The gluten-free diet transiently altered GM composition in these mice, as compared to the gliadin-supplemented diet, but did not alter body weights, glucose tolerance, insulin levels, plasma lipids, or atherosclerosis. In parallel, other Apoe-/- mice fed the same diets were treated with ampicillin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic known to affect GM composition. Ampicillin-treatment had a marked and sustained effect on GM composition, as expected. Furthermore, although ampicillin-treated mice were slightly heavier than controls, ampicillin-treatment transiently improved glucose tolerance both in the absence or presence of gliadin, reduced plasma LDL and VLDL cholesterol levels, and reduced aortic atherosclerotic lesion area. These results demonstrate that a gluten-free diet does not seem to have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis or several CVD risk factors in this mouse model, but that sustained alteration of GM composition with a broad-spectrum antibiotic has beneficial effects on CVD risk factors and atherosclerosis. These findings support the concept that altering the microbiota might provide novel treatment strategies for CVD.

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<![CDATA[Increased Incidence of Thyroid Disease in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db05ab0ee8fa60bc836c

The prevalence of thyroid disease is likely increased among individuals with celiac disease (CD). In addition, exposure to gluten-free treatment may be associated with a risk of thyroid disease, but this association remains controversial. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the association between thyroid disease and CD. The articles were obtained from the PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and Chinese WanFang bibliographical databases for the period up to May 2016. The results were analysed in a meta-analysis with odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). There were 13 articles in this meta-analysis, including 15629 CD cases and 79342 controls. Overall, the prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with CD was significantly increased compared with that in the control groups (OR 3.08, 95% CI 2.67–3.56, P<0.001). Moreover, there was no significant difference in the OR between the gluten-treated and untreated groups (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.61–1.92, P = 0.786). The results of our meta-analysis support the hypothesis that the prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with CD is increased compared with that in controls, which suggests that CD patients should be screened for thyroid disease. The effect of gluten-free treatment on thyroid disease needs further investigation.

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<![CDATA[Isolation and characterization of gluten protein types from wheat, rye, barley and oats for use as reference materials]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbf2b

Gluten proteins from wheat, rye, barley and, in rare cases, oats, are responsible for triggering hypersensitivity reactions such as celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity and wheat allergy. Well-defined reference materials (RM) are essential for clinical studies, diagnostics, elucidation of disease mechanisms and food analyses to ensure the safety of gluten-free foods. Various RM are currently used, but a thorough characterization of the gluten source, content and composition is often missing. However, this characterization is essential due to the complexity and heterogeneity of gluten to avoid ambiguous results caused by differences in the RM used. A comprehensive strategy to isolate gluten protein fractions and gluten protein types (GPT) from wheat, rye, barley and oat flours was developed to obtain well-defined RM for clinical assays and gluten-free compliance testing. All isolated GPT (ω5-gliadins, ω1,2-gliadins, α-gliadins, γ-gliadins and high- and low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits from wheat, ω-secalins, γ-75k-secalins, γ-40k-secalins and high-molecular-weight secalins from rye, C-hordeins, γ-hordeins, B-hordeins and D-hordeins from barley and avenins from oats) were fully characterized using analytical reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), N-terminal sequencing, electrospray-ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-QTOF-MS) and untargeted LC-MS/MS of chymotryptic hydrolyzates of the single GPT. Taken together, the analytical methods confirmed that all GPT were reproducibly isolated in high purity from the flours and were suitable to be used as RM, e.g., for calibration of LC-MS/MS methods or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs).

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