ResearchPad - human-study https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Analysis of Psychological and Sleep Status and Exercise Rehabilitation of Front-Line Clinical Staff in the Fight Against COVID-19 in China]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_15122 The aim of this study was to understand the changes in psychological factors and sleep status of front-line medical staff in the fight against COVID-19 and provide evidence of exercise interventions to relieve psychological stress and improve sleep status for medical staff.Material/MethodsA survey study was conducted among 120 front-line medical staff in the fight against COVID-19, of which 60 medical staff worked at the designated hospital (experimental group) and 60 medical staff worked at the non-designated hospital (control group). The Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90), Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), and PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) were used to assess mental status. Sleep status was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI).ResultsSCL-90 scores of somatization, depression, anxiety, and terror were higher than normal in front-line medical staff at the designated hospital. The SAS (45.89±1.117), SDS (50.13±1.813), and PCL-C (50.13±1.813) scores in the experimental group were higher than the normal control group, and were significantly different from those in the control group on SDS and PCL-C scales (P<0.05). The total average PSQI of the experimental group was 16.07±3.761, indicating that the sleep quality was poor. Among them, participants with moderate insomnia reached 61.67%, and participants with severe insomnia reached 26.67%.ConclusionsThere are psychological symptoms and sleep symptoms in front-line medical staff who participate in the fight against COVID-19, and they affect each other. Hospitals should improve emergency management measures, strengthen psychological counseling for clinical front-line medical staff, strengthen exercise intervention, and improve their sleep quality and mental health. ]]> <![CDATA[Glucose Transporter-1 (GLUT-1) Expression is Associated with Tumor Size and Poor Prognosis in Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N9a14cc20-16b0-47e2-bc2c-ca698278908b

Background

The clinicopathological parameters associated with glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) expression in advanced gastric cancer are still controversial. This study aimed to determine the clinicopathological parameters and prognosis associated with GLUT-1 expression in advanced gastric cancer.

Material/Methods

The GLUT-1 expression level of 234 consecutive gastric cancer samples was detected by immunohistochemical staining and evaluated by semiquantitative analysis. The clinicopathological data and expression level of GLUT-1 of enrolled patients were retrospectively analyzed with univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results

Tumor size, depth of invasion, and Lauren classification were independent factors related to GLUT-1 expression (P<0.05). Within advanced gastric cancer, tumor size and Lauren type were independent factors associated with GLUT-1 (P=0.011, P<0.001, respectively). The mean survival time of GLUT-1-positive patients with stage M0 advanced gastric cancer who had undergone radical gastrectomy was shorter than that of GLUT-1-negative patients (61.26±6.12 versus 80.88±7.38, P=0.044). GLUT-1 was an independent prognosis factor in locally advanced gastric cancer patients who had undergone radical gastrectomy (hazard ratio [HR] 1.769, P=0.046). The mean survival time of adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly better than no adjuvant chemotherapy in the GLUT-1-positive group (71.10±6.88 versus 24.65±8.69, P<0.001) and in the GLUT-1 negative group (87.48±7.99 versus 49.39±11.71, P<0.001).

Conclusions

Tumor size and Lauren type independently affected GLUT-1 expression in advanced gastric cancer. GLUT-1 was not only related to poor prognosis but also predicted to be a metabolic biomarker for intestinal type in locally advanced gastric cancer. The relationship among GLUT-1, hepatic metastasis and chemotherapy regimens, and mechanism of chemotherapy responses related to GLUT-1 should be further investigated.

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<![CDATA[Body Temperature and Energy Expenditure During and After Yoga Breathing Practices Traditionally Described as Cooling]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N21b57175-3303-4fc5-8a5a-dfb3843e9404

Background

In traditional yoga texts, sheetali and sitkari pranayamas are described as cooling. The present study was aimed at recording the surface body temperature, oxygen consumed, and carbon dioxide eliminated before, during, and after performance of sheetali and sitkari pranayamas.

Material/Methods

Seventeen healthy male volunteers with ages between 19 to 25 years (average age 20.7±1.8 years) were assessed in 4 sessions, viz. sheetali pranayama, sitkari pranayama, breath awareness and quiet lying, on 4 separate days, in random sequence. The axillary surface body temperature (TRUSCOPE II, Schiller, China) and metabolic variables (Quark CPET, COSMED, Italy) were recorded in 3 periods: before (5 minutes), during (18 minutes), and after (5 minutes), in each of the 4 sessions. The heat index was calculated in the before and after periods, based on recordings of ambient temperature and humidity. Data were analyzed using SPSS (Version 24.0).

Results

Body temperature increased significantly during sheetali and sitkari (p<0.05, p<0.01; respectively) while it decreased after breath awareness and quiet lying down (p<0.01, p<0.001; respectively) when compared with respective post-exercise states. Oxygen consumption increased by 9.0% during sheetali (p<0.05) and by 7.6% during sitkari (p<0.01) while it decreased significantly during (p<0.05) and after (p<0.01) quiet lying down compared to respective pre-exercise states.

Conclusions

The results do not support the description of these yoga breathing practices as cooling. These yoga breathing practices may be used to induce a mild hypermetabolic state.

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<![CDATA[Sleep Quality, Depression, and Quality of Life After Bilateral Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c23ff76d5eed0c484091fcd

Background

Sleep dysfunctions impose a large burden on quality of life for patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Several studies on PD reported potential therapeutic effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on motor and non-motor functions, but not related to sleep quality. Therefore, the present study examined sleep quality, depression perception, and quality of life changes after bilateral anodal tDCS in patients with PD.

Material/Methods

Twenty-one patients (n=21) with PD underwent 10 sessions (20 min each, 5 per week) of bilateral anodal tDCS stimulation applied simultaneously over the left and right prefrontal and motor areas. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) total score and sub-scores, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and Health-related quality of life questionnaire (SF-36) were measured pre/post bilateral tDCS anodal stimulation.

Results

PSQI total score (P=0.045), sleep latency sub-score (P=0.02), and GDS total score (P=0.016) significantly decreased, and physical and mental components scores of SF-36 (P=0.018 and P=0.001, respectively) significantly increased after bilateral anodal tDCS stimulation. The GDS score decrease was directly correlated with decrease in PSQI total score (P=0.01), sleep latency sub-score (P=0.002), and sleep disturbance sub-score (P=0.003). In addition, the GDS score decrease was inversely correlated with increasing mental component score of SF-36 (P=0.001), which was directly correlated with an increase in sleep efficiency sub-score (P=0.03) and the physical component score of SF-36 (P=0.0001).

Conclusions

Bilateral anodal tDCS stimulation showed potential therapeutic effects in patients with PD in terms of sleep quality and depression level improvement, which together improved mental and physical quality of life in patients with PD.

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