ResearchPad - individual-qi-projects-from-single-institutions https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Apneic Oxygenation for Emergency Intubations in the Pediatric Emergency Department—A Quality Improvement Initiative]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7762 Emergency airway management of critically ill children in the Emergency Department (ED) is associated with the risk of intubation-related desaturation, which can be minimized by apneic oxygenation. We evaluated the use of apneic oxygenation in the pediatric ED and reported a quality improvement initiative to incorporate apneic oxygenation as a routine standard of care during rapid sequence intubations (RSIs).Methods:A baseline period from June 2016 to April 2017 highlighted the practice gaps. Quality improvement interventions were subsequently developed and implemented as a care bundle consisting of a pre-intubation checklist, placing reminders and additional oxygen source in resuscitation bays, incorporating into the responsibilities of the airway doctor and the airway nurse (copiloting), education during airway workshops and simulation training for doctors and nurses, as well as enhancing documentation of the intubation process. We monitored a post-intervention observation period from May 2017 to April 2018 for the effectiveness of the care bundle.Results:Apneic oxygenation was not performed in all 22 RSIs during the baseline period. Among 25 RSIs in the post-intervention observation period, providers performed apneic oxygenation in 17 (68%) cases. There was no significant difference in the utilization of apneic oxygenation among emergency physicians and pediatric anesthetists performing RSIs in the pediatric ED.Conclusions:We successfully implemented a care bundle targeted at incorporating apneic oxygenation as a routine standard of care during emergency intubations performed in ED. This method could be adopted by other pediatric EDs to improve airway management in critically ill children. ]]> <![CDATA[Schedule-based Family-centered Rounds: A Novel Approach to Achieve High Nursing Attendance and Participation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7761 Bedside nurse (RN) presence during family-centered rounds (FCR) enhances communication and collaboration for safer, higher-quality care.1–3 At our institution, RN participation in FCR was variable and lower than desired. The content discussed at each bedside during rounds was inconsistent, contributing to the irregular achievement of established FCR checklist items.Methods:Using a scheduling tool with a prioritization algorithm and set time allotment/patient, we implemented schedule-based family-centered rounds (SBFCR) on a pediatric acute care unit. Primary outcome metrics included RN attendance and participation. We tracked rounding checklist compliance, parent presence on rounds, and adherence to the schedule. Surveys provided information on provider and family satisfaction. Perceived impact on teaching was the balancing measure because the structure discouraged spending extra time at the cost of team tardiness for the next patient.Results:We created a schedule for 95% workweek days, with the rounding order kept for 93%. Mean RN attendance increased from 69% to 87% and participation increased from 48% to 80% with SBFCR (P < 0.001 for each). FCR checklist compliance increased from 60% to 94% (P < 0.001). Families felt more informed and able to attend; their presence at rounds rose from 66% to 85% (P < 0.001). Most faculty and trainees felt SBFCR was efficient and observed increased teaching with SBFCR.Conclusions:SBFCR provides an organizational framework for increased RN attendance and participation as well as greater family presence during rounds. The system elevated provider satisfaction with rounding without degrading the perceived educational experience. ]]> <![CDATA[Key Drivers in Reducing Hospital-acquired Pressure Injury at a Quaternary Children’s Hospital]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7760 Despite being a participating Solutions for Patient Safety (SPS) children’s hospital and having attempted implementation of the SPS hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) prevention bundle, our hospital remained at a HAPI rate that was 3 times the mean for SPS participating children’s hospitals. This performance led to the launch of an enterprise-wide HAPI reduction initiative in our organization. The purpose of this article is to describe the improvement initiative, the key drivers, and the resulting decrease in the SPS-reportable HAPI rate.Methods:We designed a hospital-wide HAPI reduction initiative with actions grouped into 3 key driver areas: standardization, data transparency, and accountability. We paused all individual hospital unit-based HAPI reduction initiatives. We calculated the rate of SPS-reportable HAPIs per 1,000 patient days during both the pre- and postimplementation phases and compared mean rates using a 2-sided t test assuming unequal variances.Results:The mean SPS-reportable HAPI rate for the preimplementation phase was 0.3489, and the postimplementation phase was 0.0609. The difference in rates was statistically significant (P < 0.00032). This result equates to an 82.5% reduction in HAPI rate.Conclusions:Having an institutional pause and retooled initiative to reduce HAPI with key drivers in the areas of standardization, data transparency, and accountability had a statistically significant reduction in our organization’s SPS-reportable HAPI rate. ]]> <![CDATA[Retrospective Review of the Safety and Efficacy of Virtual Reality in a Pediatric Hospital]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7759 Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging tool for anxiety and fear reduction in pediatric patients. VR use is facilitated by Certified Child Life Specialists (CCLS) at pediatric hospitals. The primary aim of this study was to retrospectively review the safety of VR by analyzing adverse events after the utilization of VR under CCLS supervision. Secondary objectives were to characterize the efficacy of VR in enhancing patient cooperation, describe the integration of VR into Child Life services, and identify interventions that accompanied VR.Methods:The Stanford Chariot Program developed VR applications, customized VR interfaces, and patient head straps, and distributed these to CCLS. Chart review analyzed VR utilization through CCLS patient notes. Inclusion criteria were all patients ages 6 to 18-years-old who received a Child Life intervention.Results:From June 2017 to July 2018, 31 CCLS saw 8,098 patients, 3,696 of which met age criteria with pre- and post-intervention cooperation data. Two hundred thirteen patients received VR with an accompanying intervention, while 34 patients received only VR. Adverse events were rare, and included increased anxiety (3.8%, n=8), dizziness (0.5%, n=1), and nausea (0.5%, n=1). Patients were more likely to be cooperative after receiving VR (99.5%, n=212) compared to pre-intervention (96.7%, n=206, p=0.041). VR use was most common in the perioperative setting (60%, n=128), followed by outpatient clinics (15%, n=32).Conclusion:VR is safe in pediatric patients with appropriate hardware, software, and patient selection. Side effects were rare and self-limited. VR appears to be associated with improvements in cooperation. ]]> <![CDATA[Establishing Standardized Documentation for Anaphylaxis Treatment in a Tertiary Care Pediatric Allergy Clinic]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7758 Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. Common allergy clinic procedures, including oral food challenges and subcutaneous immunotherapy, carry a risk of anaphylaxis, the treatment for which is epinephrine. Our goal was to develop a standardized process for the management and documentation of allergic reactions that occur in a tertiary care pediatric allergy clinic.Methods:This was a single institution quality improvement pilot study. A multidisciplinary team from the allergy department designed, implemented, and studied the use of a standardized form for the documentation and treatment of allergic reactions within the clinic.Results:A standardized form was developed based on evidence-based guidelines for the management of allergic reactions and included space for documentation. Both clinic providers and staff approved the form. One year after the introduction, we reached 100% adherence for the use of the form in visits during which a patient experienced a severe allergic reaction requiring epinephrine. Two patients required transfer to the emergency room; the quality improvement form was utilized in these cases to document treatment and assist with the hand-off to emergency room personnel before transfer.Conclusions:We successfully implemented a standardized form for the treatment and documentation of anaphylaxis within our allergy clinic. The next steps focus on further integrating this form into the electronic medical record, determining compliance with evidence-based management of anaphylaxis, and formally assessing the use of the form as a handoff tool in the event of patient transfer. ]]> <![CDATA[Decreasing Usage of Lights and Sirens in an Urban Environment: A Quality Improvement Project]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7756 The risk of lights and sirens use in emergency medical services has been well documented. Our critical care transport team performs over 1,800 interfacility nonemergency medical services transports annually into a dense urban environment. Historically, we have utilized lights and sirens to navigate traffic patterns. The use exceeded industry standards. This quality improvement project was undertaken to decrease the use of lights and sirens.Methods/Results:The baseline use of lights and sirens in 2011 was 76% en route and 73% on return to the facility. We revised the internal policy guiding the appropriate usage of lights and sirens. In 2012, without an improvement in usage, a use justification process was implemented. By 2013, the use of lights and sirens was still high en route, but had decreased to 53% on the return trip. In 2014, we added accountability measures requiring justification, with a subsequent drop in 2015 to 14% en route and 13% on return. In the following 3 years, the transport teams have sustained lights and sirens use to 20% or below.Conclusions:This quality improvement initiative impacted team behavior and decreased the use of lights and sirens over 5 years, with sustained improvement at or below 20%. This improvement was accomplished through ongoing evaluation, education, data gathering, and open communication. There was no negative impact on patient outcomes during this time. Lights and sirens continue to be used when indicated. ]]> <![CDATA[ED RAPID: A Novel Children’s Hospital Direct Admission Process Utilizing the Emergency Department]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7755 Direct hospital admission of children without evaluation in the emergency department (ED) is common, but few guidelines exist to maximize safety by assessing patient stability. This report describes a novel approach to support patient safety.Methods:An interdisciplinary children’s hospital team developed a brief ED-based evaluation process called the ED Rapid Assessment of Patients Intended for Inpatient Disposition (ED RAPID). It entails a brief evaluation of vital signs and clinical stability by the ED attending physician and nurse. Children deemed stable are admitted to inpatient wards, whereas those requiring immediate intervention undergo full ED evaluation and disposition. We assessed outcomes for all children evaluated through this process from March 2013 through February 2015.Results:During the study period, we identified 715 patients undergoing ED RAPID evaluation. Of these, we directly admitted 691 (96.4%) to the hospital ward after ED RAPID evaluation; median ED treatment time was 4.0 minutes. We transitioned 24 (3.4%) to full ED evaluation, 14 (2.0%) because a ward bed was unavailable, and 10 (1.4%) for clinical reasons identified in the evaluation. We admitted four of the 10 stopped (40% of stops, 0.6% of total) to an intensive care unit, and 6 (60% of stops, 0.8% of total) to the hospital ward after ED care. Eight children (1.1%) admitted to the hospital ward after ED RAPID evaluation required a transfer to an intensive care unit within 12 hours.Conclusion:The ED RAPID evaluation process for children directly admitted to the hospital was feasible and effective in this setting. ]]> <![CDATA[AutoPEWS: Automating Pediatric Early Warning Score Calculation Improves Accuracy Without Sacrificing Predictive Ability]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7753 Pediatric early warning scores (PEWS) identify hospitalized children at risk for deterioration. Manual calculation is prone to human error. Electronic health records (EHRs) enable automated calculation, removing human error. This study’s objective was to compare the accuracy of automated EHR-based PEWS calculation (AutoPEWS) to manual calculation and evaluate the non-inferiority of AutoPEWS in predicting deterioration.Methods:We performed a retrospective cohort study inclusive of non-intensive care unit inpatients at a freestanding children’s hospital over 4.5 months in Fall 2018. AutoPEWS mapped the historical manual PEWS scoring rubric to frequently used EHR documentation. We determined accuracy by comparing the expected respiratory subset score based on the current respiratory rate to the actual respiratory score of AutoPEWS and the manual PEWS. The agreement was determined using kappa statistics. We used predicted probabilities from a generalized linear mixed model to calculate areas under the curve for each combination of scores (AutoPEWS, manual) and deterioration outcome (rapid response team activation, unplanned intensive care unit transfer, critical deterioration event). We compared the adjusted difference in areas under the curves between the scores. Non-inferiority was defined as a difference of <0.05.Results:There were 23,514 total PEWS representative of 5,384 patients. AutoPEWS respiratory scores were 99.97% accurate, while the manual PEWS respiratory scores were 86% accurate. AutoPEWS were higher overall than the manual PEWS (mean 0.65 versus 0.34). They showed a fair-to-good agreement (weighted kappa 0.42). Non-inferiority of AutoPEWS compared with the manual PEWS was demonstrated for all deterioration outcomes.Conclusions:Automation of PEWS calculation improved accuracy without sacrificing predictive ability. ]]> <![CDATA[Economic Evaluation: Onsite HSV PCR Capabilities for Pediatric Care]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7752 Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis has an overall mortality rate of 11%–29% with treatment. Although rare, HSV encephalitis is frequently tested for and empirically treated, especially in the neonatal population. HSV infection can be diagnosed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing, although this frequently requires sending samples to reference laboratories. The inherent delay in results may lead to prolonging empiric treatment and hospital stay, resulting in increased costs. This study investigates whether onsite HSV PCR testing decreases hospitalization duration, acyclovir treatment duration, and financial cost on an institution.Project design:This single-center project utilized the IHI model for improvement to evaluate third-party HSV PCR processing versus an implemented onsite PCR-based meningitis–encephalitis panel for HSV central nervous system evaluation. The primary outcome was hospital cost differential with secondary outcomes, including duration of acyclovir administration and time to result.Results:We identified 96 children age 0–18 from 2010 to 2016, 74 patients utilizing offsite third-party testing, and 22 patients utilizing onsite. We observed a per-patient cost savings of $428 ($618.43–$190.43, P = 0.029) upon the implementation of onsite testing. The mean duration of acyclovir therapy decreased from 3.7 to 0.26 days per patient (P < 0.001). Time to result decreased from 4.6 to 0.13 days (P < 0.001).Conclusions:Acquisition of real-time local HSV PCR capabilities significantly decreased time to result and empiric medication use while significantly reducing hospital costs in a military treatment facility. ]]> <![CDATA[The Vitals Risk Index—Retrospective Performance Analysis of an Automated and Objective Pediatric Early Warning System]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7750 Pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrests and emergent transfers to the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) represent a serious patient safety concern with associated increased morbidity and mortality. Some institutions have turned to the electronic health record and predictive analytics in search of earlier and more accurate detection of patients at risk for decompensation.Methods:Objective electronic health record data from 2011 to 2017 was utilized to develop an automated early warning system score aimed at identifying hospitalized children at risk of clinical deterioration. Five vital sign measurements and supplemental oxygen requirement data were used to build the Vitals Risk Index (VRI) model, using multivariate logistic regression. We compared the VRI to the hospital’s existing early warning system, an adaptation of Monaghan’s Pediatric Early Warning Score system (PEWS). The patient population included hospitalized children 18 years of age and younger while being cared for outside of the ICU. This dataset included 158 case hospitalizations (102 emergent transfers to the ICU and 56 “code blue” events) and 135,597 control hospitalizations.Results:When identifying deteriorating patients 2 hours before an event, there was no significant difference between Pediatric Early Warning Score and VRI’s areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve at false-positive rates ≤ 10% (pAUC10 of 0.065 and 0.064, respectively; P = 0.74), a threshold chosen to compare the 2 approaches under clinically tolerable false-positive rates.Conclusions:The VRI represents an objective, simple, and automated predictive analytics tool for identifying hospitalized pediatric patients at risk of deteriorating outside of the ICU setting. ]]> <![CDATA[Improving Disposition Decision-Making for Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Quality Improvement Study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7749 In many centers, children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) receive care either in an endocrinology ward or a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). We conducted a quality improvement (QI) initiative to reduce potentially avoidable PICU admissions of children with DKA without increasing endocrinology ward-to-PICU transfers.Methods:A survey of providers demonstrated opportunities to increase awareness of institutional criteria for PICU admissions of children with DKA. We created an electronic health record (EHR) dot-phrase, prepopulated with these criteria, and placed a note in the EHR for all patients with DKA as a reference for all providers. An EHR-based data report was created to monitor the disposition of DKA patients and the use of the dot-phrase (process measure). The primary outcome measure was the potentially avoidable PICU admissions for patients with DKA. Endocrinology ward-to-PICU transfers were tracked as a balancing measure to ensure safe disposition.Results:After the implementation of the dot-phrase, use was variable, but averaged 33.4% over 1 year. The percentage of DKA admissions classified as potentially avoidable PICU stays decreased from 4.1% to 0.5%, with a concurrent decrease in the total percentage of PICU admissions for DKA from 19.1% to 8.4%. The percentage of endocrinology ward-to-PICU transfers also declined from 0.8% to 0%.Conclusions:A novel EHR-based intervention increasing awareness and documentation of established pediatric DKA management guidelines can be used to safely reduce PICU admissions for DKA without increasing the rate of endocrinology ward-to-intensive care unit transfers. ]]> <![CDATA[Optimizing Analgesic Use During Infant Lumbar Puncture in the Emergency Department]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7748 Lumbar puncture (LP) for the collection of cerebrospinal fluid is an important diagnostic tool for the evaluation of febrile or ill-appearing infants. This invasive procedure is painful for patients; inadequate analgesia may have lasting effects. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends analgesia during all LP procedures, and oral sucrose alone does not offer sufficient analgesia. Our objective was to identify analgesic use trends during infant LP in our emergency department and create a system of analgesic administration. We aimed for complete compliance with one method of analgesia and an increase in our use of 2 or more methods to 85% over 12 months.Methods:We utilized Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle methodology and retrospective chart review. Five interventions focused on staff communication, collaboration, and education. Inclusion criteria: infants <60 days who underwent LP procedure due to fever >38°C, hypothermia <36.5°C of unknown origin, or ill-appearance.Results:One hundred infant LPs analyzed: 52 preintervention and 48 intervention. The use of one analgesic increased from 98% preintervention to 100%. The use of 2 or more analgesics increased from 58% preintervention to 87%. Topical lidocaine use increased from 56% preintervention to 73%. LP success rates were high in both groups, with no statistically significant change in the success rate.Conclusion:We created a streamlined process to ensure all infants undergoing lumbar puncture received at least 1 analgesic and increased the proportion of infants treated with 2 or more analgesics. This work could be expanded to improve analgesia during other invasive procedures in the emergency department. ]]> <![CDATA[Decreasing the Duration of Discharge Antibiotic Treatment Following Inpatient Skin and Soft Tissue Abscess Drainage]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7746 Skin and soft tissue abscesses do not require prolonged systemic antimicrobial treatment following drainage. We aimed to decrease the duration of discharge antibiotic treatment to less than 5 days following inpatient incision and drainage of uncomplicated abscesses.Methods:A new treatment protocol that defined uncomplicated abscesses, as well as inclusion and exclusion criteria, was created to monitor the accurate duration of prescribed therapy at discharge. We implemented a treatment algorithm that takes into account the epidemiologic changes in microbial etiologies and the presence of systemic findings for patients after surgical incision and drainage. We used control charts to assess the impact of the interventions.Results:Four hundred and eighteen patients were discharged following abscess drainage from our inpatient infectious diseases unit in 2016. The patients were 3 months to 21 years of age. Only 72 (17%) patients had prescribed discharge antibiotic treatment courses that were less than 5 days [range 0–31 days, median 8 days (IQR 6, 9)], and the average prescribed course at discharge was 8.6 days. During the study period, we significantly decreased the average duration of discharge antibiotics to 7.3 days in all patients (P = 0.0016, 95% CI: −2.1036 to −0.4964, difference of means −1.3). The discharge treatment duration of patients with uncomplicated abscess was shorter at 4.7 days [range 0–9 days, median 5 days, (IQR 3, 5)]. Prescription compliance to less than 5 days treatment course at discharge increased from the baseline of 17% to 42% overall.Conclusions:Standardizing definitions of uncomplicated skin and soft tissue abscesses was critical to the success of this project. In addition to possible improved treatment adherence and decreased side effects, our protocol led to decreased patient care costs with no documented changes in readmission rates. ]]> <![CDATA[Screening With Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Increased Iron Sufficiency Among NICU Patients]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7744 To increase the rate of iron sufficiency among neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients from 16% to >35% within 12 months of implementing standardized assessment of reticulocyte hemoglobin (retHE).Methods:We implemented a quality improvement (QI) study to improve iron sufficiency in our out-born level III/IV NICU. We screened 2,062 admissions, of which 622 were eligible based on feeding status at discharge. QI interventions included educational efforts and guideline implementation. Our primary outcome measure was the percentage of patients with their discharge retHE measure within the normal range. We also tracked the process measure of the number of retHE tests performed and a balancing measure of the incidence of elevated retHE among patients receiving iron supplementation. Statistical process control (SPC) charts assessed for special cause variation.Results:The percentage of patients with a retHe within the normal range was significantly increased from a mean of 20% to 39% on SPC chart analysis. We measured significantly more retHE values after guideline implementation (11/mo to 24/mo) and found no cases of elevated retHE among patients receiving iron supplementation.Conclusions:After the implementation of a standardized guideline, a higher rate of iron sufficiency was found in NICU patients at discharge. This work is generalizable to neonatal populations with the potential for a significant impact on clinical practice. ]]> <![CDATA[Reduction of Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection Through Focus on the Mesosystem: Standardization, Data, and Accountability]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7743 Efforts to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates require strong microsystems for success. However, variation in practices across units leads to challenges in ensuring accountability. We redesigned the organization’s mesosystem to provide oversight and alignment of microsystem efforts and ensure accountability in the context of the macrosystem. We implemented an A3 framework to achieve reductions in CLABSI through adherence to known evidence-based bundles.Methods:We conducted this CLABSI reduction improvement initiative at a 395-bed freestanding, academic, university-affiliated children’s hospital. A mesosystem-focused A3 emphasized bundle adherence through 3 key drivers (1) practice standardization, (2) data transparency, and (3) accountability. We evaluated the impact of this intervention on CLABSI rates during the pre-intervention (01/15-09/17) and post-intervention (07/18–06/19) periods using a Poisson model controlling for baseline trends.Results:Our quarterly CLABSI rates during the pre-intervention period ranged from 1.0 to 2.3 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line-days. With the mesosystem in place, CLABSI rates ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 per 1,000 central line days during the post-intervention period. Adjusting for secular trends, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the post versus pre-intervention CLABSI rate of 71%.Conclusion:Our hospital-wide CLABSI rate declined for the first time in many years after the redesign of the mesosystem and a focus on practice standardization, data transparency, and accountability. Our approach highlights the importance of alignment across unit-level microsystems to ensure high-fidelity implementation of practice standards throughout the healthcare-delivery system. ]]> <![CDATA[Introducing a Virtual Fracture Clinic Increases Efficiency and Reduces Costs in Torus Fracture Management]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N294389ef-b270-4f54-ab2e-e86bf6706dd1

Background:

Torus fractures of the distal radius are both a common pediatric forearm fracture and a common source of referral to orthopedic departments. Management of these injuries has moved away from traditional casting methods to using splints and softcasts.

Aim:

With the recent introduction of a virtual fracture clinic (VFC), we sought to improve our compliance with guidelines while ensuring all patients undergo review in the clinic.

Methods:

We audited the management of patients before and after the introduction of the VFC with new management protocols for torus fracture patients.

Results:

There was a 51% decrease in patients managed using plaster of Paris with 5% treated with a softcast and 59% using a splint.

Outcome:

Using the VFC can improve the management of patients with torus fractures and provide a cost-saving and a more positive experience for patients.

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<![CDATA[Multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Intervention to Achieve Sustained Improvement in Hand Hygiene Reliability in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nb2fe64fa-ecc1-41f9-898f-f03bdc8dbb61

Introduction:

Suboptimal hand hygiene (HH) remains a significant modifiable cause of healthcare-associated infections in the intensive care unit. We report a single-center, quality improvement project aimed at improving adherence to optimal HH among physicians, nurse practitioners, and nursing staff, and to sustain any improvement over time.

Methods:

A key driver diagram was developed to identify 5 primary drivers of change: leadership support, education initiatives, patient-family engagement, increased audit frequency, and individual feedback to promote accountability. We examined HH compliance over 3 years in 3 phases (pre-intervention, intervention, and post-intervention). The intervention period involved a multimodal approach designed to influence unit culture as well as individual HH practice. HH screens were installed outside the patient rooms to provide just-in-time reminders and display of regularly updated HH adherence data for provider groups.

Results:

We recorded 6,563 HH opportunities, providers included nurses (66%), attendings (12%), fellow/resident (16%), and nurse practitioners (NP) (6%). All clinical groups demonstrated HH compliance >90% during the post-intervention period. The improvements in practice were sustained for a year after the intervention.

Conclusion:

Our report highlights modifiable factors that impact HH and may inform quality improvement interventions aimed at improving HH compliance at other centers.

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<![CDATA[Timely Access to Mental Health Services for Patients with Pain]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nad242435-0e7a-46d7-b2bf-70b1d527210e

Introduction:

Efficient access to pediatric mental health services is a growing concern as the number of patients increases and outpaces efforts to expand services. This study outlines interventions implemented using quality improvement (QI) science and methodology to demonstrate how a clinic embedded in a large children’s hospital can improve access to the first appointment for a population seeking pain management services.

Methods:

A process improvement project started with a QI team, whose members designed interventions to change scheduling practices. Initial changes involved decreased time between calls to families, and efforts to streamline notifications among clinicians. Additional interventions included a close examination of waitlist assignment based on appropriateness and assessing patient interest in treatment.

Results:

Within 3 months of implementation, a significant decline in wait time occurred for patients seeking services for pain management, from 106 to 48 days. This change remained stable for 6 months. In light of a sharp increase in referrals and wait time during the study period, efforts to engage additional clinicians in managing referrals resulted in wait time to stabilize at an average of 63 days to the first appointment. This change remained for 10 months. Scheduling changes did not negatively affect other providers.

Conclusions:

This study demonstrates the application of QI science to improve patient access to mental health care. Future directions will focus on enhancing the use of the electronic health record, along with previsit family engagement.

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<![CDATA[The Effect of Smartphone-Based Application Learning on the Nursing Students’ Performance in Preventing Medication Errors in the Pediatric Units]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N353b817e-1d47-4029-b190-023422efe961

Introduction:

Medication errors (MEs) are potentially harmful patient safety events in all age groups. MEs are particularly hazardous in the pediatric population, especially with patients who require special attention due to the high incidence and severity of disease. This study aimed to determine the effect of a smartphone messenger application on nursing students’ learning regarding the prevention of MEs in pediatric patients.

Methods:

We performed this quasi-experimental study with 80 nursing students who were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. We collected the data using a researcher-made checklist. We conducted learning through Telegram, a smartphone messenger application (app), for 3 weeks. We analyzed data using SPSS version 16.0 by utilizing descriptive and inferential statistics, and P < 0.05 was considered to be significant.

Results:

The mean age of the students was 23.5 ± 2.9 years. The majority of mistakes related to MEs in the control groups included the lack of proper control of the following: high risk medication administration, medication incompatibility interactions, medication administration card, medication dose calculations, adverse drug event recognition, pharmaceutical name recognition during drug selection, aseptic and sterile technique adherence, microbore IV tubing flush practices, IV drip rate adjustment, and medication administration schedules. The mean scores of students’ performance were significantly different in the knowledge of preventing MEs between the 2 groups. (P = 0.022).

Conclusions:

Smartphone learning with the Telegram messenger app improves nursing student knowledge regarding the prevention of MEs in pediatric patients. We recommend that this form of learning be used in nursing schools to prevent errors related to medication ordering, dosing, and administration.

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<![CDATA[An Institutional Approach to the Management of Asymptomatic Chorioamnionitis-Exposed Infants Born ≥35 Weeks Gestation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N5959045f-b7f1-4dd8-9358-7326b26c0966

Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text.

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