ResearchPad - interesting-images https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[“Nature Abhors a Vaccuum”: Invagination of the Small Intestine into the Lumbar Disc Space After a Spinal Fusion Operation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_11804 A 77-year-old woman having back pain due to an L2 vertebral body compression fracture took a lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In MRI, in addition to the L2 vertebral body fracture, invagination of the small intestine into the intervertebral disc space at L5-S1 was found by chance. On a lateral lumbar spinal X-ray, the lordotic angle was markedly increased at the L5-S1 level. Additionally, the L5-S1 disc space had widened. These X-ray findings indicate the segmental instability at L5-S1. The spinal fusion operation on L3-4-5 seems to have resulted in overt mechanical loading on the inferior spinal segment (L5-S1). We think the instability damaged the anterior longitudinal ligament and caused a tear in the anterior portion of the annulus fibrosus. The defect in the L5-S1 intervertebral disc after the tear would have caused the vacuum, which is presumed to have pulled the patient’s small intestine into the empty space within the L5-S1 intervertebral disc. Although intervertebral invagination of intra-abdominal structures is not common, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of this complication in patients who have spinal segmental instability.

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<![CDATA[Lyme Neuroborreliosis in a Patient with Breast Cancer: MRI and PET/CT Findings]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N97948376-9802-43ac-b171-6d4a20654a49

We present a case demonstrating the performance of different radiographical and nuclear medicine imaging modalities in the diagnostic work-up of a patient with Lyme neuroborreliosis. The patient presented in late summer 2019 with radicular pains followed by a foot drop and peripheral facial palsy, both right-sided. Due to a history of breast cancer, disseminated malignant disease was initially suspected. Bone metastasis was ruled out by skeletal scintigraphy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the neuroaxis and a whole body 18F-FDG PET-CT was performed within 48 hours. The MRI revealed a strong contrast enhancement of the conus medullaris and fibers of the cauda equina, while the 18F-FDG PET/CT was without pathological findings. Examination of cerebrospinal fluid led to the definitive diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis with monocytic pleocytosis and a positive intrathecal test for Borrelia burgdorferi. The patient became pain-free after 10 days of ceftriaxone, and the paralysis slowly regressed the following month. This case highlights the difficulty of the diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis and discusses the relevant imaging findings.

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<![CDATA[Demonstration of Blood Flow by Color Doppler in the Femoral Artery Distal to Arterial Cannula during Peripheral Venoarterial-extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b36a4de463d7e5a25ee92c1

In spite of distal perfusion of the limb using a cannula, the limb can have ischemic events if there is an undetected kink or clot anywhere in the line or thrombus in the artery. There are several ways to monitor and assess the limb ischemia. Monitoring for clinical signs of limb ischemia like temperature change and pallor is reliable and mandatory. We report a method where we used color Doppler to document the blood flow. Curvilinear vascular probe of an echo machine is used to identify the flow in the distal femoral artery of the lower limb. As we have demonstrated in the video attached, once flow to the distal limb perfusion system is shut off by closing the three way stop cock, we can appreciate the immediate cessation of flow in the artery by Doppler.

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<![CDATA[Right ventricular thrombus in case of atrial septal defect with massive pulmonary embolism: A diagnostic dilemma]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5afeb941463d7e1b0264d8d0 ]]>