ResearchPad - invited-commentary https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Is reporting many cases of COVID-19 in Iran due to strength or weakness of Iran’s health system?]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_8352 <![CDATA[Tropical Medicine in the Horse Latitudes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N23c16d82-8593-4480-b7c5-0eaa7f518896

Some of the world’s highest rates of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) now occur among impoverished populations who live in the midst of wealth, especially in middle- and high-income countries. An illustrative example is the poor who live in nations between the 30th and 35th parallels, also known as the “horse latitudes.” Focusing on the northern horse latitudes, emerging information reveals that the neglected tropical diseases are widespread in the Middle East and North Africa, Afghanistan, Pakistan, North India, Nepal, China, and in Texas and the southern United States, particularly vector-borne tropical infections such as dengue fever and other arbovirus infections, leishmaniasis, as well as selected helminthiases. In Texas a new tropical medicine school has been established to combat such neglected tropical diseases, but worldwide there is an urgent need to generate a public policy for these conditions, as they emerge primarily among the poor and disenfranchised.

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<![CDATA[Sustaining Hospital Readiness for Ebola]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N4f0b0f11-cdb2-40aa-8e39-b0f89f05b5e9 ]]> <![CDATA[Building the political case for investing in public health and public health research]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nbbc1076a-817a-48be-8bc4-bfa848123668

Governments around the world vastly underinvest in public health, despite ever growing evidence demonstrating its economic and social benefits. Challenges in securing greater public health investment largely stem from the necessity for governments to demonstrate visible impacts within an election cycle, whereas public health initiatives operate over the long term and generally involve prevention, statistical lives and underlying conditions. It is time for the public health community to rethink its strategies and craft political wins by building a political case for investing in public health—which extends far beyond mere economic and social arguments. These strategies need to make public health visible, account for the complexities of policymaking networks and adapt knowledge translation efforts to the appropriate policy instrument.

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<![CDATA[Improving children’s diets to address the double burden of malnutrition: a healthy diet is key for all]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N50e7a34f-bb12-4c80-b22c-2328de6b56d5 ]]> <![CDATA[Blastocyst culture in the Era of PGS and FreezeAlls: Is a ‘C’ a failing grade?]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c9e53bcd5eed0c484239801 ]]> <![CDATA[Brief Report on the 11th Meeting of the European Forum on Antiphospholipid Antibodies]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c970a51d5eed0c48491e162 ]]> <![CDATA[Laparoscopy for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis catheter placement and management of malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c37bb88d5eed0c48449a102 ]]> <![CDATA[Effect of neurostimulation on cognition and mood in refractory epilepsy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5bfb3000d5eed0c484960a10

Summary

Epilepsy is a common, debilitating neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. Mood disorders and cognitive deficits are common comorbidities in epilepsy that, like seizures, profoundly influence quality of life and can be difficult to treat. For patients with refractory epilepsy who are not candidates for resection, neurostimulation, the electrical modulation of epileptogenic brain tissue, is an emerging treatment alternative. Several forms of neurostimulation are currently available, and therapy selection hinges on relative efficacy for seizure control and amelioration of neuropsychiatric comorbidities. Here, we review the current evidence for how invasive and noninvasive neurostimulation therapies affect mood and cognition in persons with epilepsy. Invasive therapies include vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS), and responsive neurostimulation (RNS). Noninvasive therapies include trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Overall, current evidence supports stable cognition and mood with all neurostimulation therapies, although there is some evidence that cognition and mood may improve with invasive forms of neurostimulation. More research is required to optimize the effects of neurostimulation for improvements in cognition and mood.

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<![CDATA[Cancer genetics program: Follow‐up on clinical genetics and genomic medicine in Qatar]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c36877ad5eed0c4841fef63

This article presents an overview of the cancer genetics program in Qatar. In addition to summarizing clinical, research, educational, and other aspects, data related to testing outcomes (over the course of approximately 5.5 years) are presented.

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<![CDATA[Improving clinical trial efficiency: Is technology the answer?]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5bfb2f56d5eed0c48495e6c6 ]]> <![CDATA[Ketogenic diet for treatment of intractable epilepsy in adults: A meta‐analysis of observational studies]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5bfb2ffed5eed0c484960998

Summary

The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for children with drug‐resistant epilepsy and has been widely used in young children. Adult patients with intractable epilepsy would also benefit from this dietary treatment. However, only a few studies have been published, and the use of the KD in intractable epilepsy in adults has been limited. This meta‐analysis summarized the findings of the relevant published studies to identify the efficacy of the KD for the treatment of intractable epilepsy in adults. In this meta‐analysis, PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library were used for searching studies concerning the effects of the KD and its major subtypes with intractable epilepsy in adults published up to January 10, 2017. The primary outcomes were seizure freedom, seizure reduction by 50% or more, and seizure reduction by <50%. The quality of the methodology of the observational studies was reviewed by using the Newcastle‐Ottawa Scale. We identified 402 articles, of which, 16 studies including 338 patients met the inclusion criteria. The results of the meta‐analysis showed that the combined efficacy rates of all the symptoms of seizure freedom, seizure reduction by 50% or more, and seizure reduction below 50% in adults with intractable epilepsy were 13%, 53%, and 27%, respectively. The adverse reactions of the KD were mild, whereas low glycemic index diet (LGID) and low‐dose fish oil diet (LFOD) may have fewer side effects. Weight loss, high level of low‐density lipoprotein, and elevated total cholesterol were most frequent. The meta‐analysis indicates that the KD for refractory epilepsy in adults is a well‐tolerated treatment and that its side effects are acceptable, which show that the KD is a promising treatment in adult intractable epilepsy. Further research is needed to assess which type of diet or ratio is more effective in the KD treatment.

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