ResearchPad - jejunum https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Broilers divergently selected for digestibility differ for their digestive microbial ecosystems]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_15757 Improving the digestive efficiency of broiler chickens (Gallus gallus) could reduce organic waste, increase the use of alternative feed not used for human consumption and reduce the impact of feed in production costs. By selecting chicken lines divergently for their digestive efficiency, we showed previously that digestive efficiency is under genetic control and that the two resulting divergent lines, D+ (high digestive efficiency or “digestibility +”) and D- (low digestive efficiency or “digestibility -”), also differ for the abundance of specific bacteria in their caeca. Here we perform a more extensive census of the bacteria present in the digestive microbiota of 60 chickens selected for their low apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen balance (AMEn-) or high (AMEn+) digestive efficiency in a [D+ x D-] F8 progeny of 200 individuals. We sequenced the 16S rRNA genes of the ileal, jejunal and caecal microbiotas, and compared the compositions and predicted functions of microbiotas from the different intestinal segments for 20 AMEn+ and 19 AMEn- birds. The intestinal segment of origin was the main factor structuring the samples. The caecal microbiota was the most impacted by the differences in digestive efficiency, with 41 bacterial species with abundances differing between highly and poorly efficient birds. Furthermore, we predicted that the caecal microbiota of efficient birds might be enriched in genes contributing to the degradation of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) from non-starch polysaccharides. These results confirm the impact of the genetic selection led on digestibility on the caecal microbiota taxonomic composition. They open the way toward the identification of specific, causal genes of the host controlling variations in the abundances of bacterial taxons.

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<![CDATA[A new set of reference housekeeping genes for the normalization RT-qPCR data from the intestine of piglets during weaning]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5bb530d640307c24312bb0b2

The intestinal mucosal development of piglets (Sus scrofa) during the weaning stage is important to their disease susceptibility and later growth. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is commonly used to screen for differentially expressed genes and, for accurate results, proper reference housekeeping genes are essential. Here we assessed the mRNA expression of 18 well-known candidate reference genes at different parts of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of piglets during the weaning process by RT-qPCR assay. GeNorm analysis revealed that B2M/HMBS/HPRT1 were the three most stable reference genes and GAPDH was the least stable gene in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, and whole GIT. BestKeeper analysis found that B2M/HMBS/PGK11, HMBS/B2M/HPRT1, B2M/HMBS/HSPCB, B2M/HPRT1/HMBS, and B2M/HMBS/HPRT1 were the most stable genes in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, and whole GIT, respectively, whereas GAPDH, B-actin, and 18S rRNA were the least stable genes at different parts of the GIT. To confirm the crucial role of appropriate housekeeping genes in obtaining reliable results, we analyzed the expression of ALP using each of the 18 reference genes to normalize the RT-qPCR data. We found that the expression levels of ALP normalized using the most stable reference genes (B2M/HMBS/HPRT1) differed greatly from the expression levels obtained when the data were normalized using the least stable genes (GAPDH, B-actin, and 18S). We concluded that B2M/HMBS/HPRT1 were the optimal reference genes for gene expression analysis by RT-qPCR in the intestinal mucosal development stages of piglets at weaning. Our findings provide a set of porcine housekeeping reference genes for studies of mRNA expression in different parts of the pig intestine.

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<![CDATA[A Microbiological Map of the Healthy Equine Gastrointestinal Tract]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dac7ab0ee8fa60bb2ba0

Horses are exquisitely sensitive to non-specific gastrointestinal disturbances as well as systemic and extraintestinal conditions related to gut health, yet minimal data are available regarding the composition of the microbiota present in the equine stomach, small intestine, and cecum and their relation to fecal microbiota. Moreover, there is minimal information regarding the concordance of the luminal and mucosal microbial communities throughout the equine gut. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of the luminal and mucosal microbiota present in seven regions of the gastrointestinal tract of nine healthy adult horses revealed a distinct compositional divide between the small and large intestines. This disparity in composition was more pronounced within the luminal contents, but was also detected within mucosal populations. Moreover, the uniformity of the gut microbiota was much higher in the cecum and colon relative to that in the stomach, jejunum and ileum, despite a significantly higher number of unique sequences detected in the colon. Collectively, the current data suggest that while colonic samples (a proxy for feces) may provide a reasonable profile of the luminal contents of the healthy equine large intestine, they are not informative with regard to the contents of the stomach or small intestine. In contrast to the distinct difference between the highly variable upper gastrointestinal tract microbiota and relatively uniform large bowel microbiota present within the lumen, these data also demonstrate a regional continuity present in mucosal microbial communities throughout the length of the equine gut.

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<![CDATA[Protected graft copolymer-formulated fibroblast growth factors mitigate the lethality of partial body irradiation injury]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db51ab0ee8fa60bdc30d

We evaluated the mitigating effects of fibroblast growth factor 4 and 7 (FGF4 and FGF7, respectively) in comparison with long acting protected graft copolymer (PGC)-formulated FGF4 and 7 (PF4 and PF7, respectively) administered to C57BL/6J mice a day after exposure to LD50/30 (15.7 Gy) partial body irradiation (PBI) which targeted the gastrointestinal (GI) system. The PGC that we developed increased the bioavailability of FGF4 and FGF7 by 5- and 250-fold compared to without PGC, respectively, and also sustained a 24 hr presence in the blood after a single subcutaneous administration. The dose levels tested for mitigating effects on radiation injury were 3 mg/kg for the PF4 and PF7 and 1.5 mg each for their combination (PF4/7). Amifostine administered prior to PBI was used as a positive control. The PF4, PF7, or PF4/7 mitigated the radiation lethality in mice. The mitigating effect of PF4 and PF7 was similar to the positive control and PF7 was better than other mitigators tested. The plasma citrulline levels and hematology parameters were early markers of recovery and survival. GI permeability function appeared to be a late or full recovery indicator. The villus length and crypt number correlated with plasma citrulline level, indicating that it can act as a surrogate marker for these histology evaluations. The IL-18 concentrations in jejunum as early as day 4 and TPO levels in colon on day 10 following PBI showed statistically significant changes in irradiated versus non-irradiated mice which makes them potential biomarkers of radiation exposure. Other colon and jejunum cytokine levels are potentially useful but require larger numbers of samples than in the present study before their full utility can be realized.

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<![CDATA[The Distribution of SIgA and IgG Antibody-Secreting Cells in the Small Intestine of Bactrian Camels (Camelus bactrianus) of Different Ages]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db0fab0ee8fa60bcb90c

Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) are two important cell types in the mucosal immune system. This study aimed to explore the distribution of these ASC populations in the small intestine of Bactrian camels of different ages. Twenty-four Alashan Bactrian camels were divided into the following four age groups: young (1–2 years), pubertal (3–5 years), middle-aged (6–16 years) and old (17–20 years). SIgA and IgG ASCs in the intestinal mucosa lamina propria (LP) were observed and analyzed using immunohistochemcal techniques. The results from all age groups show that both SIgA and IgG ASCs were diffusely distributed in the intestinal LP, and some cells aggregated around the crypts. Moreover, the densities of the two ASC populations gradually increased from the duodenum to the jejunum and then decreased in the ileum. Meanwhile, there were more SIgA ASCs than IgG ASCs in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, and these differences were significant in the young and pubertal groups (P<0.05). In addition, the SIgA and IgG ASC densities increased from the young to the pubertal period, peaked at puberty, and then gradually decreased with age. The results demonstrate that the SIgA and IgG ASC distributions help to form two immunoglobulin barriers in the intestinal mucosa to provide full protection, helping to maintain homeostasis. These findings also underscore the importance of researching the development and degeneration of intestinal mucosal immunity in Bactrian camels.

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<![CDATA[Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Regulation of Gene Expression for Lipid Catabolism in Young Broilers by Butyrate Glycerides]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da84ab0ee8fa60b9be1c

Background & Aims

Butyrate has been shown to potently regulate energy expenditure and lipid metabolism in animals, yet the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of butyrate (in the form of butyrate glycerides, BG)-induced lipid metabolism at the level of gene expression in the jejunum and liver of broilers.

Methodology/Principal Findings

Two animal experiments were included in this study. In Experiment 1, two hundred and forty male broiler chickens were equally allocated into two groups: 1) basal diet (BD), 2) BG diets (BD + BG). Growth performance was compared between treatments for the 41-day trial. In Experiment 2, forty male broiler chickens were equally allocated into two groups. The general experimental design, group and management were the same as described in Experiment 1 except for reduced bird numbers and 21-day duration of the trial. Growth performance, abdominal fat deposition, serum lipid profiles as well as serum and tissue concentrations of key enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were compared between treatments. RNA-seq was employed to identify both differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and treatment specifically expressed genes (TSEGs). Functional clustering of DEGs and TSEGs and signaling pathways associated with lipid metabolism were identified using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) and DAVID Bioinformatics Resources 6.7 (DAVID-BR). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were subsequently conducted to further examine the expression of genes in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) signaling pathway identified by DAVID-BR. Dietary BG intervention significantly reduced abdominal fat ratio (abdominal fat weight/final body weight) in broilers. The decreased fat deposition in BG-fed chickens was in accordance with serum lipid profiles as well as the level of lipid metabolism-related enzymes in the serum, abdominal adipose, jejunum and liver. RNA-seq analysis indicated that dietary BG intervention induced 79 and 205 characterized DEGs in the jejunum and liver, respectively. In addition, 255 and 165 TSEGs were detected in the liver and jejunum of BG-fed group, while 162 and 211 TSEGs genes were observed in the liver and jejunum of BD-fed birds, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis with both IPA and DAVID-BR further revealed a significant enrichment of DEGs and TSEGs in the biological processes for reducing the synthesis, storage, transportation and secretion of lipids in the jejunum, while those in the liver were for enhancing the oxidation of ingested lipids and fatty acids. In particular, transcriptional regulators of THRSP and EGR-1 as well as several DEGs involved in the PPAR-α signaling pathway were significantly induced by dietary BG intervention for lipid catabolism.

Conclusions

Our results demonstrate that BG reduces body fat deposition via regulation of gene expression, which is involved in the biological events relating to the reduction of synthesis, storage, transportation and secretion, and improvement of oxidation of lipids and fatty acids.

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<![CDATA[Changes in bacterial community composition of Escherichia coli O157:H7 super-shedder cattle occur in the lower intestine]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db53ab0ee8fa60bdcb57

Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a foodborne pathogen that colonizes ruminants. Cattle are considered the primary reservoir of E. coli O157:H7 with super-shedders, defined as individuals excreting > 104 E. coli O157:H7 CFU g-1 feces. The mechanisms leading to the super-shedding condition are largely unknown. Here, we used 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to examine the composition of the fecal bacterial community in order to investigate changes in the bacterial microbiota at several locations along the digestive tract (from the duodenum to the rectal-anal junction) in 5 steers previously identified as super-shedders and 5 non-shedders. The overall bacterial community structure did not differ by E. coli O157:H7 shedding status; but several differences in the relative abundance of taxa and OTUs were noted between the two groups. The genus Prevotella was most enriched in the non-shedders while the genus Ruminococcus and the Bacteroidetes phylum were notably enriched in the super-shedders. There was greater bacterial diversity and richness in samples collected from the lower- as compared to the upper gastrointestinal tract (GI). The spiral colon was the only GI location that differed in terms of bacterial diversity between super-shedders and non-shedders. These findings reinforced linkages between E. coli O157:H7 colonization in cattle and the nature of the microbial community inhabiting the digestive tract of super-shedders.

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<![CDATA[Physiological Concentration of Exogenous Lactate Reduces Antimycin A Triggered Oxidative Stress in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2 In Vitro]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da16ab0ee8fa60b7b585

Weaning triggers an adaptation of the gut function including luminal lactate generation by lactobacilli, depending on gastrointestinal site. We hypothesized that both lactobacilli and lactate influence porcine intestinal epithelial cells. In vivo experiments showed that concentration of lactate was significantly higher in gastric, duodenal and jejunal chyme of suckling piglets compared to their weaned counterparts. In an in vitro study we investigated the impact of physiological lactate concentration as derived from the in vivo study on the porcine intestinal epithelial cells IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2. We detected direct adherence of lactobacilli on the apical epithelial surface and a modulated F-actin structure. Application of lactobacilli culture supernatant alone or lactate (25 mM) at low pH (pH 4) changed the F-actin structure in a similar manner. Treatment of IPEC cultures with lactate at near neutral pH resulted in a significantly reduced superoxide-generation in Antimycin A-challenged cells. This protective effect was nearly completely reversed by inhibition of cellular lactate uptake via monocarboxylate transporter. Lactate treatment enhanced NADH autofluorescence ratio (Fcytosol/Fnucleus) in non-challenged cells, indicating an increased availability of reduced nucleotides, but did not change the overall ATP content of the cells. Lactobacilli-derived physiological lactate concentration in intestine is relevant for alleviation of redox stress in intestinal epithelial cells.

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<![CDATA[Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da7fab0ee8fa60b9a0af

Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption.

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<![CDATA[Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of Frizzled 6 in the small intestine of pigs (Sus scrofa)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5fab0ee8fa60be1098

Frizzled 6 (FZD6) encodes an integral membrane protein that functions in multiple signal transduction pathways, for example, as a receptor in Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway for polarized cell migration and organ morphogenesis. Mutations in FZD6 have been identified in a variety of tumors. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Sus scrofa FZD6 (Sfz6) was cloned and characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrates that the Sfz6 gene encodes the 712 amino-acid (aa) protein with seven transmembrane domain. Tissue distribution analysis showed that Sfz6 mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, being highest in kidney, moderate in jejunum, ileum, colon, liver, and spleen. However, FZD6 protein is highly expressed in the heart and there was no significant difference in other tissues. The relative abundance and localization of FZD6 protein in jejunum along the crypt-villus axis was determined by Western blot and immunohistochemical localization. The results show that in the jejunum, FZD6 protein is highly expressed in the villus and less in the crypt cells. Cellular proliferation and viability assays indicate that knockdown of FZD6 with small interfering RNAs (siRNA) significantly reduced the cell viability of the intestinal porcine enterocyte cells (IPEC-J2). Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot analysis revealed that expressions of ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1); ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1), some components of PCP signaling pathway were upregulated (P < 0.05) by knockdown of FZD6 in IPEC-J2 cells. In conclusion, these results showed that FZD6 abundance in the villus was higher than that in crypt cells and knockdown of FZD6 induces PCP signal pathway components expression in IPEC-J2 cells. Our findings provide the foundation for further investigation into porcine FZD6 gene.

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<![CDATA[Influence of Butyrate Loaded Clinoptilolite Dietary Supplementation on Growth Performance, Development of Intestine and Antioxidant Capacity in Broiler Chickens]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daadab0ee8fa60baa273

The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary butyrate loaded clinoptilolite (CLI-B) on growth performance, pancreatic digestive enzymes, intestinal development and histomorphology, as well as antioxidant capacity of serum and intestinal mucosal in chickens. Two hundred forty 1-day-old commercial Arbor Acres broilers were randomly assigned to 4 groups: CON group (fed basal diets), SB group (fed basal diet with 0.05% sodium butyrate), CLI group (fed basal diet with 1% clinoptilolite), and CLI-B group (fed basal diet with 1% CLI-B). The results showed that supplementation of CLI-B significantly decreased (P < 0.05) feed conservation ratio at both 21 and 42 days of age, improved the pancreatic digestive enzymes activities (P < 0.05), increased the villus length and villus/crypt ratio (P < 0.05), and decreased the crypt depth of intestine (P < 0.05) as compared to the other experimental groups. Furthermore, the CLI-B environment improved the antioxidant capacity by increasing the antioxidant enzyme activities (P < 0.05) in intestine mucosal, and decreasing the NO content and iNOS activity (P < 0.05) in serum. In addition, CLI-B supplementation had improved the development of intestine and antioxidant capacity of broilers than supplementation with either clinoptilolite or butyrate sodium alone. In conclusion, 1% CLI-B supplementation improved the health status, intestine development and antioxidant capacity in broiler chickens, thus appearing as an important feed additive for the poultry industry.

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<![CDATA[Neuromedin B and Its Receptor: Gene Cloning, Tissue Distribution and Expression Levels of the Reproductive Axis in Pigs]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db0eab0ee8fa60bcb139

Neuromedin B is one member of a family of bombesin-like peptides, which performs a variety of physiological functions via their receptor (NMBR) in most mammals. However, the genes encoding NMB and NMBR and their functions especially reproduction of the pigs are currently not fully understood. To research the physiological functions of NMB, we cloned and analyzed the NMB and NMBR genes, and systematically investigated the expression levels of NMB and NMBR mRNA using relative real-time PCR and the distribution of NMBR by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Experimental results show that the sequences of the amino acid and gene of NMB and NMBR were highly conservative and homology in many species, Significantly, the relative RT-PCR results revealed that NMB was mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas NMBR is highly expressed in peripheral tissues and organs, such as endocrine tissues, glands and reproductive organs. The IHC results show that NMBR positive cells were widely distributed in the body, such as respiratory and circulatory system, digestive system, urogenital system, in lymphatic organs and in the endocrine system. We also systematically investigated expression levels of NMB and NMBR in the reproductive axis using relative real-time PCR. In sow estrous cycle, the hypothalamic levels of both NMB and NMBR mRAN were similar, but the expression levels of the pituitary were negatively correlated. Expression levels in the ovarian system are lowest in metestrus phases and highest in proestrus and estrus phases. In boar post-natal development stages, the hypothalamic, pituitary and testicular levels of NMB and NMBR mRNAs showed developmental changes on postnatal day 30, 60, 90 and 120. Taken together, this study provided molecular and morphological data necessary for further research of physiological function of NMB/NMBR system in the pigs.

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<![CDATA[Apo AIV and Citrulline Plasma Concentrations in Short Bowel Syndrome Patients: The Influence of Short Bowel Anatomy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da42ab0ee8fa60b8a410

Introduction

Parenteral nutrition (PN) dependence in short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients is linked to the functionality of the remnant small bowel (RSB). Patients may wean off PN following a period of intestinal adaptation that restores this functionality. Currently, plasma citrulline is the standard biomarker for monitoring intestinal functionality and adaptation. However, available studies reveal that the relationship the biomarker with the length and function of the RSB is arguable. Thus, having additional biomarkers would improve pointing out PN weaning.

Aim

By measuring concomitant changes in citrulline and the novel biomarker apolipoprotein AIV (Apo AIV), as well as taking into account the anatomy of the RSB, this exploratory study aims to a better understanding of the intestinal adaptation process and characterization of the SBS patients under PN.

Methods

Thirty four adult SBS patients were selected and assigned to adapted (aSBS) and non-adapted (nSBS) groups after reconstructive surgeries. Remaining jejunum and ileum lengths were recorded. The aSBS patients were either on an oral diet (ORAL group), those with intestinal insufficiency, or on oral and home parenteral nutrition (HPN group), those with chronic intestinal failure. Apo AIV and citrulline were analyzed in plasma samples after overnight fasting. An exploratory ROC analysis using citrulline as gold standard was performed.

Results

Biomarkers, Apo AIV and citrulline showed a significant correlation with RSBL in aSBS patients. In jejuno-ileocolic patients, only Apo AIV correlated with RSBL (rb = 0.54) and with ileum length (rb = 0.84). In patients without ileum neither biomarker showed any correlation with RSBL. ROC analysis indicated the Apo AIV cut-off value to be 4.6 mg /100 mL for differentiating between the aSBS HPN and ORAL groups.

Conclusions

Therefore, in addition to citrulline, Apo AIV can be set as a biomarker to monitor intestinal adaptation in SBS patients. As short bowel anatomy is shown to influence citrulline and Apo AIV plasma values, both biomarkers complement each other furnishing a new insight to manage PN dependence.

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<![CDATA[Transcriptome of interstitial cells of Cajal reveals unique and selective gene signatures]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db51ab0ee8fa60bdc363

Transcriptome-scale data can reveal essential clues into understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms behind specific cellular functions and biological processes. Transcriptomics is a continually growing field of research utilized in biomarker discovery. The transcriptomic profile of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), which serve as slow-wave electrical pacemakers for gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle, has yet to be uncovered. Using copGFP-labeled ICC mice and flow cytometry, we isolated ICC populations from the murine small intestine and colon and obtained their transcriptomes. In analyzing the transcriptome, we identified a unique set of ICC-restricted markers including transcription factors, epigenetic enzymes/regulators, growth factors, receptors, protein kinases/phosphatases, and ion channels/transporters. This analysis provides new and unique insights into the cellular and biological functions of ICC in GI physiology. Additionally, we constructed an interactive ICC genome browser (http://med.unr.edu/physio/transcriptome) based on the UCSC genome database. To our knowledge, this is the first online resource that provides a comprehensive library of all known genetic transcripts expressed in primary ICC. Our genome browser offers a new perspective into the alternative expression of genes in ICC and provides a valuable reference for future functional studies.

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<![CDATA[Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da35ab0ee8fa60b85d84

Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress.

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<![CDATA[Finishing pigs that are divergent in feed efficiency show small differences in intestinal functionality and structure]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db51ab0ee8fa60bdc311

Controversial information is available regarding the feed efficiency-related variation in intestinal size, structure and functionality in pigs. The present objective was therefore to investigate the differences in visceral organ size, intestinal morphology, mucosal enzyme activity, intestinal integrity and related gene expression in low and high RFI pigs which were reared at three different geographical locations (Austria, AT; Northern Ireland, NI; Republic of Ireland, ROI) using similar protocols. Pigs (n = 369) were ranked for their RFI between days 42 and 91 postweaning and low and high RFI pigs (n = 16 from AT, n = 24 from NI, and n = 60 from ROI) were selected. Pigs were sacrificed and sampled on ~day 110 of life. In general, RFI-related variation in intestinal size, structure and function was small. Some energy saving mechanisms and enhanced digestive and absorptive capacity were indicated in low versus high RFI pigs by shorter crypts, higher duodenal lactase and maltase activity and greater mucosal permeability (P < 0.05), but differences were mainly seen in pigs from AT and to a lesser degree in pigs from ROI. Additionally, low RFI pigs from AT had more goblet cells in duodenum but fewer in jejunum compared to high RFI pigs (P < 0.05). Together with the lower expression of TLR4 and TNFA in low versus high RFI pigs from AT and ROI (P < 0.05), these results might indicate differences in the innate immune response between low and high RFI pigs. Results demonstrated that the variation in the size of visceral organs and intestinal structure and functionality was greater between geographic location (local environmental factors) than between RFI ranks of pigs. In conclusion, present results support previous findings that the intestinal size, structure and functionality do not significantly contribute to variation in RFI of pigs.

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<![CDATA[A Combination of Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Attenuates Radiation Induced Gastrointestinal Injury by Negatively Regulating NF-κB/p53 Signaling in Lethally Irradiated Mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da31ab0ee8fa60b847e0

Development of an effective radio protector to minimise radiation-inflicted damages have largely failed owing to inherent toxicity of most of the agents examined so far. This study is centred towards delivering protection to lethally irradiated mice by pre-administration of a safe formulation G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) majorly through regulation of inflammatory and cell death pathways in mice. Single intramuscular dose of G-003M injected 60 min prior to 9 Gy exposure rescued 89% of whole body lethally irradiated C57BL/6J mice. Studies have revealed reduction in radiation induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) generation, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels and intestinal apoptosis in G-003M pre-treated mice intestine. Restricted nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and subsequent downregulation of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS; EC 1.14.13.39) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect that G-003M exerts. Support to early hematopoietic recovery was exhibited through G-003M mediated induction of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin (IL-6) levels in lethally irradiated mice. Considerable attenuation in radiation induced morphological damage to the intestinal villi, crypts and mucosal layers was observed in G-003M pre-treated mice. Additionally, our formulation did not reduce the sensitivity of tumor tissue to radiation. Altogether, these results suggest that G-003M ameliorates the deleterious effects of radiation exposure by minimising ROS and NO generation and effectively regulating inflammatory and cell death pathways. Mechanism of protection elucidated in the current study demonstrates that G-003M can be used as a safe and effective radio protective agent in radiotherapy for human application.

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<![CDATA[Emergence and development of gut motility in the chicken embryo]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4fab0ee8fa60bdb9fc

The gastrointestinal tract transports the food bolus by peristalsis. Gut motility starts at an early age in the developing embryo, well before it is required for nutrition of the organism. We present a comprehensive kinematic study of the emergence and physiological development of gut motility in all regions of the lower digestive tract of the chicken embryo from embryonic days E5 through E9. We characterized motility emergence time, propagation patterns, speed, frequency and amplitude of peristalsis waves. We found that the emergence of an uninterrupted circular ring of smooth muscle correlated with the appearance of propagative contractile waves, at E6 in the hindgut and midgut, and at E9 in the caecal appendix. We show that peristalsis at these stages is critically dependent on calcium and is not mediated by neurons as gut motility is insensitive to tetrodotoxin and takes place in the hindgut in the absence of neurons. We further demonstrate that motility also matures in ex-vivo organ culture. We compare our results to existing literature on zebrafish, mouse and human motility development, and discuss their chronological relationship with other major developmental events occurring in the chicken embryonic gut at these stages. Our work sets a baseline for further investigations of motility development in this important animal model.

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<![CDATA[Oral administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 alleviates rotavirus gastroenteritis through regulation of intestinal homeostasis by inducing mucosal protective factors]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db53ab0ee8fa60bdc9e8

Human rotavirus (RV) infection is a leading cause of dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Since therapeutic approaches to RV gastroenteritis are limited to alleviation of dehydration with oral rehydration solutions, more direct approaches to palliate symptoms of RV gastroenteritis are required. Treatments with probiotics have been increasingly recognized as alternative safe and low cost treatments for moderate infectious diarrhea. In this study, Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 (BBG9-1), which has been used as an intestinal drug for several decades, was shown to have a remarkable protective effect against RV gastroenteritis in a suckling mice model. As well as prophylactic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 2 days before RV infection, therapeutic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 1 day after RV infection significantly alleviated RV-induced diarrhea. Therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 reduced various types of damage in the small intestine, such as epithelial vacuolization and villous shortening, and significantly diminished the infectious RV titer in mixtures of cecal contents and feces. It was also shown that therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly increased the number of acidic mucin-positive goblet cells and the gene expression of mucosal protective factors including MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, TGFβ1 and TFF3 in the small intestine. This led to alleviation of low gut permeability shown as decreased gene expression levels of occludin, claudin-1 and villin-1 after RV infection. Furthermore, in the small intestine, therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly palliated the decreased gene expression of SGLT-1, which plays an important role in water absorption. In the large intestine, administered BBG9-1 was shown to replicate to assimilate undigested nutrients, resulting in normalization of the abnormally high osmotic pressure. These results suggested that water malabsorption caused by RV infection was alleviated in mice administered BBG9-1. Thus, the present study showed that oral administration of BBG9-1 palliated diarrhea partly through protection against RV-induced lesions by inducing mucosal protective factors. Oral administration of BBG9-1 is thought to be an efficient method for management of an RV epidemic for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes.

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<![CDATA[Mechanism(S) Involved in the Colon-Specific Expression of the Thiamine Pyrophosphate (Tpp) Transporter]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da94ab0ee8fa60ba1567

Microbiota of the large intestine synthesizes considerable amount of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in the form of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). We have recently demonstrated the existence of an efficient and specific carrier-mediated uptake process for TPP in human colonocytes, identified the TPP transporter (TPPT) involved (product of the SLC44A4 gene), and shown that expression of TPPT along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is restricted to the colon. Our aim in this study was to determine the molecular basis of the colon-specific expression of TPPT focusing on a possible epigenetic mechanism. Our results showed that the CpG island predicted in the SLC44A4 promoter is non-methylated in the human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells, but is hyper-methylated in the human duodenal epithelial HuTu80 cells (as well as in the human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE19 cells). In the mouse (where TPPT expression in the GI tract is also restricted to the colon), the CpG island predicted in the Slc44a4 promoter is non-methylated in both the jejunum and colon, thus arguing against possible contribution of DNA methylation in the colon-specific expression of TPPT. A role for histone modifications in the tissue-specific pattern of Slc44a4 expression, however, was suggested by the findings that in mouse colon, histone H3 in the 5’-regulatory region of Slc44a4 is tri-methylated at lysine 4 and acetylated at lysine 9, whereas the tri-methylation at lysine 27 modification was negligible. In contrast, in the mouse jejunum, histone H3 is hyper-trimethylated at lysine 27 (repressor mark). Similarly, possible involvement of miRNA(s) in the tissue-specific expression of TPPT was also suggested by the findings that the 3’-UTR of SLC44A4 is targeted by specific miRNAs/RNA binding proteins in non-colonic, but not in colonic, epithelial cells. These studies show, for the first time, epigenetic mechanisms (histone modifications) play a role in determining the tissue-specific pattern of expression of TPPT in the GI tract.

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