ResearchPad - leukemia-cells https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Patient-derived oral mucosa organoids as an <i>in vitro</i> model for methotrexate induced toxicity in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_15720 We have recently established a protocol to grow wildtype human oral mucosa organoids. These three-dimensional structures can be maintained in culture long-term, do not require immortalization, and recapitulate the multilayered composition of the epithelial lining of the oral mucosa. Here, we validate the use of this model to study the effect of Leucovorin (LV) on Methotrexate (MTX)-induced toxicity. MTX is a chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Although effective, the use of MTX often results in severe side-effects, including oral mucositis, which is characterized by epithelial cell death. Here, we show that organoids are sensitive to MTX, and that the addition of LV reduces MTX toxicity, in both a concentration- and timing-dependent manner. Additionally, we show that a 24 hour ‘pretreatment’ with LV reduces MTX-induced cell death, suggesting that such a pretreatment could decrease mucositis in patients. Taken together, we provide the first in vitro model to study the effect of MTX on wildtype oral mucosa cells. Our findings underscore the relevance of the clinically applied LV regimen and highlight the potential of this model to further optimize modifications in dosing and timing of Leucovorin on oral mucosa cells.

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<![CDATA[Discovery of a Family of Genomic Sequences Which Interact Specifically with the c-MYC Promoter to Regulate c-MYC Expression]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da42ab0ee8fa60b8a740

G-quadruplex forming sequences are particularly enriched in the promoter regions of eukaryotic genes, especially of oncogenes. One of the most well studied G-quadruplex forming sequences is located in the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 of the c-MYC promoter region. The oncoprotein c-MYC regulates a large array of genes which play important roles in growth regulation and metabolism. It is dysregulated in >70% of human cancers. The silencer NHEIII1 located upstream of the P1 promoter regulates up-to 80% of c-MYC transcription and includes a G-quadruplex structure (Pu27) that is required for promoter inhibition. We have identified, for the first time, a family of seventeen G-quadruplex-forming motifs with >90% identity with Pu27, located on different chromosomes throughout the human genome, some found near or within genes involved in stem cell maintenance or neural cell development. Notably, all members of the Pu27 family interact specifically with NHEIII1 sequence, in vitro. Crosslinking studies demonstrate that Pu27 oligonucleotide binds specifically to the C-rich strand of the NHEIII1 resulting in the G-quadruplex structure stabilization. Pu27 homologous sequences (Pu27-HS) significantly inhibit leukemic cell lines proliferation in culture. Exposure of U937 cells to the Pu27-HS induces cell growth inhibition associated with cell cycle arrest that is most likely due to downregulation of c-MYC expression at the RNA and/or protein levels. Expression of SOX2, another gene containing a Pu27-HS, was affected by Pu27-HS treatment as well. Our data suggest that the oligonucleotides encoding the Pu27 family target complementary DNA sequences in the genome, including those of the c-MYC and SOX2 promoters. This effect is most likely cell type and cell growth condition dependent. The presence of genomic G-quadruplex-forming sequences homologous to Pu27 of c-MYC silencer and the fact that they interact specifically with the parent sequence suggest a common regulatory mechanism for genes whose promoters contain these sequences.

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<![CDATA[Ethyl Pyruvate Combats Human Leukemia Cells but Spares Normal Blood Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da26ab0ee8fa60b80987

Ethyl pyruvate, a known ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory drug was found to combat leukemia cells. Tumor cell killing was achieved by concerted action of necrosis/apoptosis induction, ATP depletion, and inhibition of glycolytic and para-glycolytic enzymes. Ethyl lactate was less harmful to leukemia cells but was found to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Both, ethyl pyruvate and ethyl lactate were identified as new inhibitors of GSK-3β. Despite the strong effect of ethyl pyruvate on leukemia cells, human cognate blood cells were only marginally affected. The data were compiled by immune blotting, flow cytometry, enzyme activity assay and gene array analysis. Our results inform new mechanisms of ethyl pyruvate-induced cell death, offering thereby a new treatment regime with a high therapeutic window for leukemic tumors.

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<![CDATA[The human asparaginase enzyme (ASPG) inhibits growth in leukemic cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be000a

The human protein ASPG is an enzyme with a putative antitumor activity. We generated in bacteria and then purified a recombinant GST-ASPG protein that we used to characterize the biochemical and cytotoxic properties of the human ASPG. We demonstrated that ASPG possesses asparaginase and PAF acetylhydrolase activities that depend on a critical threonine residue at position 19. Consistently, ASPG but not its T19A mutant showed cytotoxic activity in K562, NALM-6 and MOLT-4 leukemic cell lines but not in normal cells. Regarding the mechanism of action of ASPG, it was able to induce a significant apoptotic death in K562 cells. Taken together our data suggest that ASPG, combining different enzymatic activities, should be considered a promising anti-cancer agent for inhibiting the growth of leukemia cells.

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<![CDATA[A Critical Role of CDKN3 in Bcr-Abl-Mediated Tumorigenesis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e5ab0ee8fa60b6ae8c

CDKN3 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3), a dual specificity protein phosphatase, dephosphorylates cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and thus functions as a key negative regulator of cell cycle progression. Deregulation or mutations of CDNK3 have been implicated in various cancers. However, the role of CDKN3 in Bcr-Abl-mediated chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) remains unknown. Here we found that CDKN3 acts as a tumor suppressor in Bcr-Abl-mediated leukemogenesis. Overexpression of CDKN3 sensitized the K562 leukemic cells to imanitib-induced apoptosis and dramatically inhibited K562 xenografted tumor growth in nude mouse model. Ectopic expression of CDKN3 significantly reduced the efficiency of Bcr-Abl-mediated transformation of FDCP1 cells to growth factor independence. In contrast, depletion of CDKN3 expression conferred resistance to imatinib-induced apoptosis in the leukemic cells and accelerated the growth of xenograph leukemia in mice. In addition, we found that CDKN3 mutant (CDKN3-C140S) devoid of the phosphatase activity failed to affect the K562 leukemic cell survival and xenografted tumor growth, suggesting that the phosphatase of CDKN3 was required for its tumor suppressor function. Furthermore, we observed that overexpression of CDKN3 reduced the leukemic cell survival by dephosphorylating CDK2, thereby inhibiting CDK2-dependent XIAP expression. Moreover, overexpression of CDKN3 delayed G1/S transition in K562 leukemic cells. Our results highlight the importance of CDKN3 in Bcr-Abl-mediated leukemogenesis, and provide new insights into diagnostics and therapeutics of the leukemia.

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<![CDATA[The CCL2/CCR2 Axis Affects Transmigration and Proliferation but Not Resistance to Chemotherapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da36ab0ee8fa60b864d0

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has a high mortality rate despite chemotherapy and transplantation. Both CXCR4/SDF-1 and VLA-4/VCAM1 axes are involved in leukemia protection but little is known about the role of CCL2/CCR2 in AML biology and protection against chemotherapy. We measured CCR2 expression in AML cell lines and primary AML cells by flow cytometry (FCM), real time PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot (WB). CCL2 production was quantified by solid phase ELISA in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) serum. We measured chemotaxis in a transwell system with different concentrations of CCL2/CCR2 blockers; cell cycle with BrDU and propidium iodide and proliferation with yellow tetrazolium MTT. We determined synergy in in vitro cell apoptosis combining chemotherapy and CCL2/CCR2 blockade. Finally, we performed chemoprotection studies in an in vivo mouse model. Of 35 patients, 23 (65%) expressed CCR2 by FCM in PB. Two cell lines expressed high levels of CCR2 (THP-1 and murine AML). RT-PCR and WB confirmed CCR2 production. CCL2 solid phase ELISA showed significantly lower levels of CCL2 in PB and BM compared to normal controls. Chemotaxis experiments confirmed a dose-dependent migration in AML primary cells expressing CCR2 and THP-1 cells. A significant inhibition of transmigration was seen after CCL2/CCR2 blockade. Proliferation of CCR2+ AML cell lines was slightly increased (1.4-fold) after axis stimulation. We observed a non-significant increase in phase S THP-1 cells exposed to CCL2 and a concomitant decrease of cells in G1. The chemotherapy studies did not show a protective effect of CCL2 on cytarabine-induced apoptosis or synergy with chemotherapy after CCL2/CCR2 blockade both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, CCL2/CCR2 axis is expressed in the majority of monocytoid AML blasts. The axis is involved in cell trafficking and proliferation but no in vitro and in vivo chemotherapy protective effect was seen.

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<![CDATA[Thymoquinone Inhibits Murine Leukemia WEHI-3 Cells In Vivo and In Vitro]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daa1ab0ee8fa60ba5f82

Background

Thymoquinone is an active ingredient isolated from Nigella sativa (Black Seed). This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-leukemic effects of thymoquinone on WEHI-3 cells.

Methodology/Principal Findings

The cytotoxic effect of thymoquinone was assessed using an MTT assay, while the inhibitory effect of thymoquinone on murine WEHI-3 cell growth was due to the induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by chromatin condensation dye, Hoechst 33342 and acridine orange/propidium iodide fluorescent staining. In addition, Annexin V staining for early apoptosis was performed using flowcytometric analysis. Apoptosis was found to be associated with the cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Expression of Bax, Bcl2 and HSP 70 proteins were observed by western blotting. The effects of thymoquinone on BALB/c mice injected with WEHI-3 cells were indicated by the decrease in the body, spleen and liver weights of the animal, as compared to the control.

Conclusion

Thymoquinone promoted natural killer cell activities. This compound showed high toxicity against WEHI-3 cell line which was confirmed by an increase of the early apoptosis, followed by up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl2, and down-regulation of the apoptotic protein, Bax. On the other hand, high reduction of the spleen and liver weight, and significant histopathology study of spleen and liver confirmed that thymoquinone inhibited WEHI-3 growth in the BALB/c mice. Results from this study highlight the potential of thymoquinone to be developed as an anti-leukemic agent.

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<![CDATA[Investigating CD99 Expression in Leukemia Propagating Cells in Childhood T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da45ab0ee8fa60b8b7ff

A significant number of children with T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) fail to respond to therapy and experience early relapse. CD99 has been shown to be overexpressed on T-ALL cells and is considered to be a reliable detector of the disease. However, the relevance of CD99 overexpression in ALL has not been investigated in a functional context. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional capacity of CD99+ cells in childhood ALL and determine the suitability of CD99 as a therapeutic target. Flow cytometric analyses confirmed higher expression of CD99 in ALL blasts (81.5±22.7%) compared to normal hemopoietic stem cells (27.5±21.9%) and T cells (3.1±5.2%, P≤0.004). When ALL cells were sorted and assessed in functional assays, all 4 subpopulations (CD34+/CD99+, CD34+/CD99-, CD34-/CD99+ and CD34-/CD99-) could proliferate in vitro and establish leukemia in NSG mice. Leukemia propagating cell frequencies ranged from 1 in 300 to 1 in 7.4x104 but were highest in the CD34+/CD99- subpopulation. In addition, all four subpopulations had self-renewal ability in secondary NSG mice. Cells in each subpopulation contained patient specific TCR rearrangements and karyotypic changes that were preserved with passage through serial NSG transplants. Despite high levels of CD99 antigen on the majority of blast cells, leukemia initiating capacity in vivo was not restricted to cells that express this protein. Consequently, targeting CD99 alone would not eliminate all T-ALL cells with the ability to maintain the disease. The challenge remains to develop therapeutic strategies that can eliminate all leukemia cells with self-renewal capacity in vivo.

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<![CDATA[Glycosylation Status of CD43 Protein Is Associated with Resistance of Leukemia Cells to CTL-Mediated Cytolysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f5ab0ee8fa60b6ffeb

To improve cancer immunotherapy, it is important to understand how tumor cells counteract immune-surveillance. In this study, we sought to identify cell-surface molecules associated with resistance of leukemia cells to cytotoxic T cell (CTL)-mediated cytolysis. To this end, we first established thousands of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that react with MLL/AF9 mouse leukemia cells. Only two of these mAbs, designated R54 and B2, bound preferentially to leukemia cells resistant to cytolysis by a tumor cell antigen–specific CTLs. The antigens recognized by these mAbs were identified by expression cloning as the same protein, CD43, although their binding patterns to subsets of hematopoietic cells differed significantly from each other and from a pre-existing pan-CD43 mAb, S11. The epitopes of R54 and B2, but not S11, were sialidase-sensitive and expressed at various levels on leukemia cells, suggesting that binding of R54 or B2 is associated with the glycosylation status of CD43. R54high leukemia cells, which are likely to express sialic acid-rich CD43, were highly resistant to CTL-mediated cytolysis. In addition, loss of CD43 in leukemia cells or neuraminidase treatment of leukemia cells sensitized leukemia cells to CTL-mediated cell lysis. These results suggest that sialic acid-rich CD43, which harbors multiple sialic acid residues that impart a net negative surface charge, protects leukemia cells from CTL-mediated cell lysis. Furthermore, R54high or B2high leukemia cells preferentially survived in vivo in the presence of adaptive immunity. Taken together, these results suggest that the glycosylation status of CD43 on leukemia is associated with sensitivity to CTL-mediated cytolysis in vitro and in vivo. Thus, regulation of CD43 glycosylation is a potential strategy for enhancing CTL-mediated immunotherapy.

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<![CDATA[Identification of Novel HLA-A*24:02-Restricted Epitope Derived from a Homeobox Protein Expressed in Hematological Malignancies]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db0aab0ee8fa60bc9c27

The homeobox protein, PEPP2 (RHOXF2), has been suggested as a cancer/testis (CT) antigen based on its expression pattern. However, the peptide epitope of PEPP2 that is recognized by cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) is unknown. In this study, we revealed that PEPP2 gene was highly expressed in myeloid leukemia cells and some other hematological malignancies. This gene was also expressed in leukemic stem-like cells. We next identified the first reported epitope peptide (PEPP2271-279). The CTLs induced by PEPP2271-279 recognized PEPP2-positive target cells in an HLA-A*24:02-restricted manner. We also found that a demethylating agent, 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine, could enhance PEPP2 expression in leukemia cells but not in blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. The cytotoxic activity of anti-PEPP2 CTL against leukemic cells treated with 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine was higher than that directed against untreated cells. These results suggest a clinical rationale that combined treatment with this novel antigen-specific immunotherapy together with demethylating agents might be effective in therapy-resistant myeloid leukemia patients.

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<![CDATA[Dysregulated signaling, proliferation and apoptosis impact on the pathogenesis of TCRγδ+ T cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db51ab0ee8fa60bdc447

TCRγδ+ T-LGL leukemia is a rare form of chronic mature T cell disorders in elderly, which is generally characterized by a persistently enlarged CD3+CD57+TCRγδ+ large granular lymphocyte population in the peripheral blood with a monoclonal phenotype. Clinically, the disease is heterogeneous, most patients being largely asymptomatic, although neutropenia, fatigue and B symptoms and underlying diseases such as autoimmune diseases or malignancies are also often observed. The etiology of TCRγδ+ T-LGL proliferations is largely unknown. Here, we aimed to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of these rare proliferations by performing gene expression profiling of TCRγδ+ T-LGL versus normal TCRγδ+ T cell subsets. From our initial microarray dataset we observed that TCRγδ+ T-LGL leukemia forms a separate group when compared with different healthy control TCRγδ+ T cell subsets, correlating best with the healthy TemRA subset. The lowest correlation was seen with the naive subset. Based on specific comparison between healthy control cells and TCRγδ+ T-LGL leukemia cells we observed up-regulation of survival, proliferation and hematopoietic system related genes, with a remarkable down-regulation of apoptotic pathway genes. RQ-PCR validation of important genes representative for the dataset, including apoptosis (XIAP, CASP1, BCLAF1 and CFLAR), proliferation/development (ID3) and inflammation (CD28, CCR7, CX3CR1 and IFNG) processes largely confirmed the dysregulation in proliferation and apoptosis. Based on these expression data we conclude that TCRγδ+ T-LGL leukemia is likely the result of an underlying aberrant molecular mechanisms leading to increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis.

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<![CDATA[Methylation level of CpG islands in GGH gene promoter in pediatric acute leukemia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db52ab0ee8fa60bdc5e8

Background

γ-Glutamyl hydrolase (GGH) regulates intracellular folates and antifolates such as methotrexate (MTX) for proper nucleotide biosynthesis and antifolate-induced cytotoxicity, respectively. In addition to genetic polymorphism and karyotypic abnormalities, methylation of CpG island 1 (CpG1) in the promoter region is found to modulate GGH activity by reducing GGH mRNA expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We aim to investigate methylation status of two CpG islands (CpG1 and CpG2) in the GGH promoter region in pediatric patients with ALL and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Methods

70B-ALL, 29 AML, 10 ITP (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura) and 40 healthy children are recruited in the present study. MS-HRM (methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting) and bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP) are used to detect methylation change and its level in CpG1 and CpG2 in the GGH promoter region. GGH mRNA expression is quantified by real-time PCR. Correlation between CpG island methylation and GGH mRNA expression is assessed by statistical software.

Results

Methylations of CpG1 are detected in leukemia cells samples obtained from 30.9% (21/68) of patients with ALL and 20.7% (6/29) of patients with AML. These methylations are not detected in the controls. Methylations of CpG2 are detected in leukemia cell samples obtained from 44.1% (30/68) of the ALL patients and 37.9% (11/29) of the AML patients. These percentages are significantly higher than that observed in the control cell samples: 6.0% (3/50) (Fisher's exact test, P = 0.000). The abundance of CpG1 methylation in all leukemia cell samples is classified as Grade I (methylation level is less than 10%) and the abundance of CpG2 methylation in leukemia cell samples is classified in separate grades. Our results indicate that methylation of CpG1 or hypermethylation (the methylation level is greater than 10%) of CpG2 could significantly reduce GGH mRNA expression in leukemia cells from the ALL and AML patients (ALL-CpG1: t = 4.632, P = 0.000; ALL-CpG2: t = 3.250, P = 0.006; AML-CpG1: t = -2.254, P = 0.037; AML-CpG2: t = 1.328, P = 0.202).

Conclusion

Either methylation of CpG1 or hypermethylation of CpG2 in GGH promoter region can significantly reduce GGH mRNA expression in pediatric patients with acute leukemia, which can improve the response to treatment.

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