ResearchPad - lipoproteins https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Association between attending exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation and cardiovascular risk factors at one-year post myocardial infarction]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7688 Randomized trials confirm the benefits of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on cardiovascular risk factors. Whether exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation provides the same favourable effects in real-life cardiac rehabilitation settings, in the modern era of myocardial infarction treatment, is less well known. We examined the association between attending exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation and improvements in cardiovascular risk factors at one-year post myocardial infarction in patients included in the Swedish heart disease registry, SWEDEHEART.MethodsIn this retrospective registry-based cohort study, we included 19 136 patients post myocardial infarction (75% men, 62.8±8.7 years) who were registered in SWEDEHEART between 2011 and 2013. The association between attending exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (43% participation rate) and changes in cardiovascular risk profile between baseline and one-year follow-up was assessed using multivariable regression analysis adjusting for age, comorbidities and medication.ResultsAttenders more often reported to have stopped smoking (men 64% vs 50%; women 64% vs 53%, p<0.001 for both, only smokers at baseline considered), be more physically active (men 3.9±2.5 vs 3.4±2.7 days/week; women 3.8±2.6 vs 3.0±2.8 days/week, p<0.001 for both) and achieved a slightly larger reduction in triglycerides (men -0.2±0.8 vs -0.1±0.9 mmol/L, p = 0.001; women -0.1±0.6 vs 0.0±0.8 mmol/L, p = 0.01) at one-year compared to non-attenders. Male attenders gained less weight (+0.0±5.7 vs +0.3±5.7 kg, p = 0.01) while female attenders achieved better lipid control (total cholesterol -1.2±1.4 vs -0.9±1.4 mmol/L, p<0.001; low-density lipoprotein -1.2±1.2 vs -0.9 ±1.2 mmol/L, p<0.001) compared to non-attenders.ConclusionsIn an unselected registry cohort of patients post myocardial infarction, compared to non-attenders those attending exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation achieved significantly larger improvements in cardiovascular risk factors at one-year after the acute event. ]]> <![CDATA[Opposing effects of HNP1 (α-defensin-1) on plasma cholesterol and atherogenesis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Ndf7081dd-c312-4392-aa9c-ddf6cf67dfa0

Atherosclerosis, the predominant cause of death in well-resourced countries, may develop in the presence of plasma lipid levels within the normal range. Inflammation may contribute to lesion development in these individuals, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Transgenic mice expressing α-def-1 released from activated neutrophils develop larger lipid and macrophage-rich lesions in the proximal aortae notwithstanding hypocholesterolemia caused by accelerated clearance of α-def-1/low-density lipoprotein (LDL) complexes from the plasma. The phenotype does not develop when the release of α-def-1 is prevented with colchicine. However, ApoE-/- mice crossed with α-def-1 mice or given exogenous α-def-1 develop smaller aortic lesions associated with reduced plasma cholesterol, suggesting a protective effect of accelerated LDL clearance. Experiments were performed to address this seeming paradox and to determine if α-def-1 might provide a means to lower cholesterol and thereby attenuate atherogenesis. We confirmed that exposing ApoE-/- mice to α-def-1 lowers total plasma cholesterol and decreases lesion size. However, lesion size was larger than in mice with total plasma cholesterol lowered to the same extent by inhibiting its adsorption or by ingesting a low-fat diet. Furthermore, α-def-1 levels correlated independently with lesion size in ApoE-/- mice. These studies show that α-def-1 has competing effects on atherogenesis. Although α-def-1 accelerates LDL clearance from plasma, it also stimulates deposition and retention of LDL in the vasculature, which may contribute to development of atherosclerosis in individuals with normal or even low plasma levels of cholesterol. Inhibiting α-def-1 may attenuate the impact of chronic inflammation on atherosclerotic vascular disease.

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<![CDATA[Apolipoprotein B correlates with intra-plaque necrotic core volume in stable coronary artery disease]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c75ac91d5eed0c484d08a4e

Objective

To determine the relationship between plaque composition and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), apolipoprotein B (Apo-B), and Apo-A1 using virtual-histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS).

Methods

We assessed plaque composition in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCD) admitted to our hospital for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between November 1, 2012, and March 10, 2015. Before PCI, fibrous (FI), fibrofatty (FF), necrotic core (NC), and dense calcium (DC) regions were evaluated using VH-IVUS, and the contributions of each to the culprit lesion volume were recorded. Plasma LDL-C, HDL-C, Apo-B, and Apo-A1 levels were assessed before PCI. The relationship between the regions on VH-IVUS and plasma lipid levels was assessed. Patients were categorized into low Apo-B (LAB) and high Apo-B (HAB) groups, based on the overall cohort median Apo-B level.

Results

We enrolled 115 patients (median Apo-B, 91 mg/dL, male n = 88) with 57 and 58 patients in the LAB (Apo-B ≤ 90 mg/dL) and HAB (Apo-B ≥ 91 mg/dL) groups, respectively. Vessel, plaque, and %NC volumes were significantly greater in the HAB group than in the LAB group. The %FI, %FF, and %DC volumes were similar in both groups. In all 115 patients, the %NC volume correlated with LDL-C (r = 0.2353, P = 0.0114) and Apo-B (r = 0.2487, P = 0.0074) but not with HDL-C and Apo A-1. The high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level tended to be higher in the HAB group than in the LAB group. Multiple regression analysis showed that being male, Apo-A1, and Apo-B were significant predictors of %NC volume extent.

Conclusions

Elevated Apo-B level was related to the %NC in target coronary artery lesions in SCD patients, suggesting a role of Apo-B as a biomarker of unstable plaque in this population.

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<![CDATA[Mortality risk in adults according to categories of impaired glucose metabolism after 18 years of follow-up in the North of Spain: The Asturias Study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5ca2e8d5eed0c48441ed1d

People who develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) are known to have a higher mortality risk. We estimated all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality-risks in our patient cohort according to categories of impaired glucose metabolism. This 18-year retrospective analysis included a region-wide, representative sample of a population aged 30–75 years. Age- and sex-stratified hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for 48 participants with diagnosed T2D, 83 with undiagnosed T2D (HbA1c ≥6.5%, fasting glycemia ≥126 mg/dL, or glycemia after 75 g glucose load ≥200 mg/dL); 296 with prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7%-6.4%, fasting glycemia 100–125 mg/dL, or glycemia after 75 g glucose load 140–199 mg/dL), and 607 with normoglycemia. Over 18,612 person-years, 32 individuals with undiagnosed T2D, 30 with diagnosed T2D, 62 with prediabetes, and 80 with normoglycemia died. Total sample crude mortality rate (MR) was 10.96 deaths per 1,000 person-years of follow-up. MR of the diagnosed T2D group was more than 3-times higher and that of newly diagnosed T2D was 2-times higher (34.72 and 21.42, respectively) than total sample MR. Adjusted HR for all-cause mortality was 2.02 (95% confidence interval 1.29–3.16) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.00–2.28) in the diagnosed T2D group and the newly diagnosed T2D group, respectively. Adjusted HR for cardiovascular mortality in the T2D group was 2.79 (95% CI 1.35–5.75); this risk was greatly increased in women with T2D: 6.72 (95% CI 2.50–18.07). In Asturias, age- and sex-standardized all-cause mortality is more than 2-times higher for adults with T2D than for adults without T2D. The HR for cardiovascular mortality is considerably higher in T2D women than in normoglycemic women.

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<![CDATA[Tofu and fish oil independently modulate serum lipid profiles in rats: Analyses of 10 class lipoprotein profiles and the global hepatic transcriptome]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c605a43d5eed0c4847ccc8f

Soy protein and fish oil are food components that decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease. Previous studies demonstrated that these food components reduced serum cholesterol levels and suppressed hepatic lipogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms of action of these food components remain unclear. Ten classes of serum lipoprotein profiles showed that dietary tofu, a soybean curd, suppressed cholesterol absorption, while fish oil reduced most of the lipoprotein classes in rats. Tofu and fish oil both halved the level of the lipoprotein class LAC1 (LDL-anti-protease complex), a 15-nm LDL-anti-protease complex, which is speculated to be a cause of atherosclerosis. Moreover, a global transcriptome analysis revealed that tofu inhibited the mRNA expression of genes involved in hepatic lipogenesis, while fish oil stimulated that of genes related to fatty acid degradation. Therefore, tofu and fish oil independently regulate lipid metabolism. The decrease observed in LAC1 may have been due to reduced cholesterol absorption in the tofu diet group and the interference of lipogenesis via the activation of polyunsaturated fatty acid detoxification in the fish oil group.

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<![CDATA[The effects of prednisolone treatment on serological responses and lipid profiles in Ethiopian leprosy patients with Erythema Nodosum Leprosum reactions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c2fcf50d5eed0c484a6e0c2

Background

Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) is a systemic inflammatory complication occurring mainly in patients with lepromatous leprosy (LL) and borderline lepromatous leprosy (BL). Prednisolone is widely used for treatment of ENL reactions. However, it has been reported that prolonged treatment with prednisolone increases the risk for prednisolone-induced complications such as osteoporosis, diabetes, cataract and arteriosclerosis. It has been speculated that perhaps these complications result from lipid profile alterations by prednisolone. The effects of extended prednisolone treatment on lipid profiles in ENL patients have not been studied in leprosy patients with ENL reactions. Therefore, in this study we conducted a case-control study to investigate the changes in lipid profiles and serological responses in Ethiopian patients with ENL reaction after prednisolone treatment.

Methods

A prospective matched case–control study was employed to recruit 30 patients with ENL and 30 non-reactional LL patient controls at ALERT Hospital, Ethiopia. Blood samples were obtained from each patient with ENL reaction before and after prednisolone treatment as well as from LL controls. The serological host responses to PGL-1, LAM and Ag85 M. leprae antigens were measured by ELISA. Total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were measured by spectrophotometric method.

Results

The host antibody response to M. leprae PGL-1, LAM and Ag85 antigens were significantly reduced in patients with ENL reactions compared to LL controls after treatment. Comparison between patients with acute and chronic ENL showed that host-response to PGL-1 was significantly reduced in chronic ENL after prednisolone treatment. Untreated patients with ENL reactions had low lipid concentration compared to LL controls. However, after treatment, both groups had comparable lipid profiles except for LDL, which was significantly higher in patients with ENL reaction. Comparison within the ENL group before and after treatment showed that prednisolone significantly increased LDL and HDL levels in ENL patients and this was more prominent in chronic ENL than in acute patients with ENL.

Conclusion

The significantly increased prednisolone-induced LDL and TG levels, particularly in patients with chronic ENL reactions, is a concern in the use of prednisolone for extended periods in ENL patients. The findings highlight the importance of monitoring lipid profiles during treatment of patients to minimize the long-term risk of prednisolone-induced complications.

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<![CDATA[Mid-arm muscle circumference: A significant factor of all-cause and cancer mortalities in individuals with elevated platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c1c0b0bd5eed0c4844272fd

Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) is an inflammatory maker, and high PLR is associated with mortality in several diseases. The predictors of mortality in individuals with high PLR is still lacking. Our aims were to assess if mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC) can predict all-cause mortality, cancer mortality, and cardiovascular mortality in individuals with high PLR. Adult participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (1988–1994) were included. All participants were divided into low PLR and high PLR groups with the cut-off point being the median PLR level, and each group was evaluated for risk factors of mortality. MAMC was divided into tertiles and the general characteristics of the study population related to MAMC were evaluated. The study included 14,221 adults with 6,701 (47.1%) male and 7,520 (52.9%) female participants. The median PLR ratio was 122. Higher levels of systolic blood pressure, total triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, C-reactive protein, uric acid, and glucose, as well as a higher age, were associated with increased risk of mortality in both groups. After adjusting for all the covariates, in the higher PLR group, the highest MAMC tertile was significantly associated with lower hazard ratios for all-cause and cancer mortalities compared with the lowest MAMC tertile. However, this association was not observed in the low PLR group. The highest MAMC tertile showed protective effects from all-cause and cancer mortalities compared with the lowest MAMC tertile in individuals with PLR ≥ 122. In conclusion, the highest MAMC tertile was significantly associated with decreasing HRs for all-cause and cancer mortalities compared with the lowest MAMC tertile in individuals with elevated PLR.

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<![CDATA[Longer TOMM40 poly-T variants associated with higher FDDNP-PET medial temporal tau and amyloid binding]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c117bdfd5eed0c48469abab

Background

The translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 (TOMM40), which lies in linkage disequilibrium with the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene, has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). TOMM40 influences AD pathology through mitochondrial neurotoxicity, and the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is the most likely brain region for identifying early manifestations of AD-related morphology changes. While early reports indicated that the longer length poly-T allele of TOMM40 increases risk for AD, these findings have not been consistently replicated in further studies. We examined the effect of TOMM40 and APOE on regional brain positron emission tomography (PET) 2-(1-{6-[(2 [F18]fluoroethyl) (methyl) amino]-2-naphthyl}ethylidene)malononitrile (FDDNP) binding values in MTL.

Methods

A total of 73 non-demented older adults (42 females; mean age: 62.9(10.9) completed genotyping for both APOE and TOMM40 and received FDDNP-PET scans. For TOMM40, the lengths of the poly-T sequence were classified as short (14–20 repeats; S), long (21–29 repeats, L) or very long (>29 repeats, VL). Using general linear models, we examined medial temporal lobe FDDNP binding and cognitive functioning between TOMM40 and APOE-4 groups, with age, sex, and education as covariates.

Results

Data from 30 individuals with APOE-4 and L TOMM40 poly-T length, 11 non E4 TOMM40 S/S, 14 non E4 TOMM40 S/VL and 13 non E4 TOMM40 VL/VL were analyzed. Medial temporal FDDNP binding differed significantly between TOMM40/APOE groups (F(3,62) = 3.3,p = .03). Participants with TOMM40 S/S exhibited significantly lower binding compared to TOMM40 S/VL and APOE-4 carriers. We did not find a significant relationship between TOMM40 poly-T lengths/APOE risk groups and cognitive functioning.

Conclusions

This is the first report to demonstrate a significant association between longer TOMM40 poly-T lengths and higher medial temporal plaque and tangle burden in non-demented older adults. Identifying biomarkers that are risk factors for AD will enhance our ability to identify subjects likely to benefit from novel AD treatments.

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<![CDATA[Mycoplasmas are no exception to extracellular vesicles release: Revisiting old concepts]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c0841ebd5eed0c484fcb27d

Release of extracellular vesicles (EV) by Gram-negative and positive bacteria is being frequently reported. EV are nano-sized, membrane-derived, non-self-replicating, spherical structures shed into the extracellular environment that could play a role in bacteria-host interactions. Evidence of EV production in bacteria belonging to the class Mollicutes, which are wall-less, is mainly restricted to the genus Acholeplasma and is scanty for the Mycoplasma genus that comprises major human and animal pathogens. Here EV release by six Mycoplasma (sub)species of clinical importance was investigated. EV were obtained under nutritional stress conditions, purified by ultracentrifugation and observed by electron microscopy. The membrane proteins of EV from three different species were further identified by mass spectrometry as a preliminary approach to determining their potential role in host-pathogen interactions. EV were shown to be released by all six (sub)species although their quantities and sizes (30–220 nm) were very variable. EV purification was complicated by the minute size of viable mycoplasmal cells. The proteins of EV-membranes from three (sub)species included major components of host-pathogen interactions, suggesting that EV could contribute to make the host-pathogen interplay more complex. The process behind EV release has yet to be deciphered, although several observations demonstrated their active release from the plasma membrane of living cells. This work shed new light on old concepts of “elementary bodies” and “not-cell bound antigens”.

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<![CDATA[Proteomic Analysis of Aortae from Human Lipoprotein(a) Transgenic Mice Shows an Early Metabolic Response Independent of Atherosclerosis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f0ab0ee8fa60b6e3fc

Background

Elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL) and lipoprotein(a) are independent risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis. Using a proteomic approach we aimed to determine early changes in arterial protein expression in transgenic mice containing both human LDL and lipoprotein(a) in circulation.

Methods and Results

Plasma lipid analyses showed the lipoprotein(a) transgenic mice had significantly higher lipid levels than wildtype, including a much increased LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Analysis of aortae from lipoprotein(a) mice showed lipoprotein(a) accumulation but no lipid accumulation or foam cells, leaving the arteries essentially atherosclerosis free. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we identified 34 arterial proteins with significantly altered abundance (P<0.05) in lipoprotein(a) transgenic mice compared to wildtype including 17 that showed a ≥2 fold difference. Some proteins of interest showed a similarly altered abundance at the transcript level. These changes collectively indicated an initial metabolic response that included a down regulation in energy, redox and lipid metabolism proteins and changes in structural proteins at a stage when atherosclerosis had not yet developed.

Conclusions

Our study shows that human LDL and lipoprotein(a) promote changes in the expression of a unique set of arterial proteins which may be early indicators of the metabolic disturbances preceding atherosclerosis.

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<![CDATA[Anabaenolysins, Novel Cytolytic Lipopeptides from Benthic Anabaena Cyanobacteria]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da7cab0ee8fa60b98b26

Two novel cyclic lipopeptides, anabaenolysin A and anabaenolysin B, were isolated from two benthic cyanobacterial strains of the genus Anabaena. This novel class of cyanobacterial lipopeptides has a general structure of a small peptide ring consisting of four amino acids from which two are proteinogenic and two unusual; glycine1, glycine2, 2-(3-amino-5-oxytetrahydrofuran-2-yl)-2-hydroxyacetic acid3 and a long unsaturated C18 β-amino acid4 with a conjugated triene structure. They are distinguished by the presence of a conjugated dienic structure in the C18 β-amino acid present in anabaenolysin A but not in anabaenolysin B. Conjugated triene structure generates a typical UV spectrum for anabaenolysins for easy recognition. Anabaenolysin A constituted up to 400 ppm of the cyanobacterial dry weight. We found evidence of thirteen variants of anabaenolysins in one cyanobacterial strain. This suggests that the anabaenolysins are an important class of secondary metabolites in benthic Anabaena cyanobacteria. Both anabaenolysin A and B had cytolytic activity on a number of mammalian cell lines.

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<![CDATA[Apolipoprotein A-II Influences Apolipoprotein E-Linked Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Women with High Levels of HDL Cholesterol and C-Reactive Protein]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db3bab0ee8fa60bd4fa2

Background

In a previous report by our group, high levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) were demonstrated to be associated with risk of incident cardiovascular disease in women with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the setting of both low (designated as HR1 subjects) and high (designated as HR2 subjects) levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C).

To assess whether apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) plays a role in apoE-associated risk in the two female groups.

Methodology/Principal

Outcome event mapping, a graphical data exploratory tool; Cox proportional hazards multivariable regression; and curve-fitting modeling were used to examine apoA-II influence on apoE-associated risk focusing on HDL particles with apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) without apoA-II (LpA-I) and HDL particles with both apoA-I and apoA-II (LpA-I:A-II). Results of outcome mappings as a function of apoE levels and the ratio of apoA-II to apoA-I revealed within each of the two populations, a high-risk subgroup characterized in each situation by high levels of apoE and additionally: in HR1, by a low value of the apoA-II/apoA-I ratio; and in HR2, by a moderate value of the apoA-II/apoA-I ratio. Furthermore, derived estimates of LpA-I and LpA-I:A-II levels revealed for high-risk versus remaining subjects: in HR1, higher levels of LpA-I and lower levels of LpA-I:A-II; and in HR2 the reverse, lower levels of LpA-I and higher levels of LpA-I:A-II. Results of multivariable risk modeling as a function of LpA-I and LpA-I:A-II (dichotomized as highest quartile versus combined three lower quartiles) revealed association of risk only for high levels of LpA-I:A-II in the HR2 subgroup (hazard ratio 5.31, 95% CI 1.12–25.17, p = 0.036). Furthermore, high LpA-I:A-II levels interacted with high apoE levels in establishing subgroup risk.

Conclusions/Significance

We conclude that apoA-II plays a significant role in apoE-associated risk of incident CVD in women with high levels of HDL-C and CRP.

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<![CDATA[Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli CusC, the Outer Membrane Component of a Heavy Metal Efflux Pump]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f1ab0ee8fa60b6e6d5

Background

While copper has essential functions as an enzymatic co-factor, excess copper ions are toxic for cells, necessitating mechanisms for regulating its levels. The cusCBFA operon of E. coli encodes a four-component efflux pump dedicated to the extrusion of Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions.

Methodology/Principal Findings

We have solved the X-ray crystal structure of CusC, the outer membrane component of the Cus heavy metal efflux pump, to 2.3 Å resolution. The structure has the largest extracellular opening of any outer membrane factor (OMF) protein and suggests, for the first time, the presence of a tri-acylated N-terminal lipid anchor.

Conclusions/Significance

The CusC protein does not have any obvious features that would make it specific for metal ions, suggesting that the narrow substrate specificity of the pump is provided by other components of the pump, most likely by the inner membrane component CusA.

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<![CDATA[Associations of Circulating Oxidized LDL and Conventional Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of the Navajo Population]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daa9ab0ee8fa60ba8a5f

The prevalences of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have increased among the Navajo Native American community in recent decades. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a novel CVD biomarker that has never been assessed in the Navajo population. We examined the relationship of oxLDL to conventional CVD and T2D risk factors and biomarkers in a cross-sectional population of Navajo participants. This cross-sectional study included 252 participants from 20 Navajo communities from the Diné Network for Environmental Health Project. Plasma samples were tested for oxLDL levels by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the relationship of oxLDL and oxidized- to non-oxidized lipoprotein ratios to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL6) and demographic and health variables. Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and obesity are very prevalent in this Navajo population. HbA1c, CRP, body mass index (BMI), high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides were at levels that may increase risk for CVD and T2D. Median oxLDL level was 47 (36.8–57) U/L. Correlational analysis showed that although oxLDL alone was not associated with HbA1c, oxLDL/HDL, oxLDL/LDL and CRP were significantly associated with HbA1c and glucose. OxLDL, oxLDL/HDL and oxLDL/LDL were significantly associated with CRP. Multivariate analysis showed that triglycerides were a common and strong predictor of oxLDL, oxLDL/HDL and oxLDL/LDL. OxLDL was trended with HbA1c and glucose but did not reach significance, however, HbA1c was an independent predictor of OxLDL/HDL. CRP trended with oxLDL/HDL and was a weak predictor of oxLDL/LDL. This Navajo subset appears to have oxLDL levels comparable to subjects without evidence of CVD reported in other studies. The high prevalence of T2D, hypertension and obesity along with abnormal levels of other biomarkers including HbA1c indicate that the Navajo population has a worsening CVD risk profile.

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<![CDATA[Caveolin-1-Mediated Apolipoprotein A-I Membrane Binding Sites Are Not Required for Cholesterol Efflux]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db1bab0ee8fa60bce153

Caveolin-1 (Cav1), a structural protein required for the formation of invaginated membrane domains known as caveolae, has been implicated in cholesterol trafficking and homeostasis. Here we investigated the contribution of Cav1 to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) cell surface binding and intracellular processing using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from wild type (WT) or Cav1-deficient (Cav1−/−) animals. We found that cells expressing Cav1 have 2.6-fold more apoA-I binding sites than Cav1−/− cells although these additional binding sites are not associated with detergent-free lipid rafts. Further, Cav1-mediated binding targets apoA-I for internalization and degradation and these processes are not correlated to cholesterol efflux. Despite lower apoA-I binding, cholesterol efflux from Cav1−/− MEFs is 1.7-fold higher than from WT MEFs. Stimulation of ABCA1 expression with an LXR agonist enhances cholesterol efflux from both WT and Cav1−/− cells without increasing apoA-I surface binding or affecting apoA-I processing. Our results indicate that there are at least two independent lipid binding sites for apoA-I; Cav1-mediated apoA-I surface binding and uptake is not linked to cholesterol efflux, indicating that membrane domains other than caveolae regulate ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux.

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<![CDATA[Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Mipomersen in Patients with Severe Hypercholesterolemia Receiving Maximally Tolerated Lipid-Lowering Therapy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da35ab0ee8fa60b86227

Objectives

Mipomersen, an antisense oligonucleotide targeting apolipoprotein B synthesis, significantly reduces LDL-C and other atherogenic lipoproteins in familial hypercholesterolemia when added to ongoing maximally tolerated lipid-lowering therapy. Safety and efficacy of mipomersen in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia was evaluated.

Methods and Results

Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Patients (n  = 58) were ≥18 years with LDL-C ≥7.8 mmol/L or LDL-C ≥5.1 mmol/L plus CHD disease, on maximally tolerated lipid-lowering therapy that excluded apheresis. Weekly subcutaneous injections of mipomersen 200 mg (n  = 39) or placebo (n  = 19) were added to lipid-lowering therapy for 26 weeks. Main outcome: percent reduction in LDL-C from baseline to 2 weeks after the last dose of treatment. Mipomersen (n = 27) reduced LDL-C by 36%, from a baseline of 7.2 mmol/L, for a mean absolute reduction of 2.6 mmol/L. Conversely, mean LDL-C increased 13% in placebo (n = 18) from a baseline of 6.5 mmol/L (mipomersen vs placebo p<0.001). Mipomersen produced statistically significant (p<0.001) reductions in apolipoprotein B and lipoprotein(a), with no change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Mild-to-moderate injection site reactions were the most frequently reported adverse events with mipomersen. Mild-to-moderate flu-like symptoms were reported more often with mipomersen. Alanine transaminase increase, aspartate transaminase increase, and hepatic steatosis occurred in 21%, 13% and 13% of mipomersen treated patients, respectively. Adverse events by category for the placebo and mipomersen groups respectively were: total adverse events, 16(84.2%), 39(100%); serious adverse events, 0(0%), 6(15.4%); discontinuations due to adverse events, 1(5.3%), 8(20.5%) and cardiac adverse events, 1(5.3%), 5(12.8%).

Conclusion

Mipomersen significantly reduced LDL-C, apolipoprotein B, total cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a). Mounting evidence suggests it may be a potential pharmacologic option for lowering LDL-C in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia not adequately controlled using existing therapies. Future studies will explore alternative dosing schedules aimed at minimizing side effects.

Trial Registration

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00794664.

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<![CDATA[Liver X receptor agonist treatment significantly affects phenotype and transcriptome of APOE3 and APOE4 Abca1 haplo-deficient mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4fab0ee8fa60bdbc60

ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) controls cholesterol and phospholipid efflux to lipid-poor apolipoprotein E (APOE) and is transcriptionally controlled by Liver X receptors (LXRs) and Retinoic X Receptors (RXRs). In APP transgenic mice, lack of Abca1 increased Aβ deposition and cognitive deficits. Abca1 haplo-deficiency in mice expressing human APOE isoforms, increased level of Aβ oligomers and worsened memory deficits, preferentially in APOE4 mice. In contrast upregulation of Abca1 by LXR/RXR agonists significantly ameliorated pathological phenotype of those mice. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of LXR agonist T0901317 (T0) on the phenotype and brain transcriptome of APP/E3 and APP/E4 Abca1 haplo-deficient (APP/E3/Abca1+/- and APP/E4/Abca1+/-) mice. Our data demonstrate that activated LXRs/RXR ameliorated APOE4-driven pathological phenotype and significantly affected brain transcriptome. We show that in mice expressing either APOE isoform, T0 treatment increased mRNA level of genes known to affect brain APOE lipidation such as Abca1 and Abcg1. In both APP/E3/Abca1+/- and APP/E4/Abca1+/- mice, the application of LXR agonist significantly increased ABCA1 protein level accompanied by an increased APOE lipidation, and was associated with restoration of APOE4 cognitive deficits, reduced levels of Aβ oligomers, but unchanged amyloid load. Finally, using Gene set enrichment analysis we show a significant APOE isoform specific response to LXR agonist treatment: Gene Ontology categories “Microtubule Based Process” and “Synapse Organization” were differentially affected in T0-treated APP/E4/Abca1+/- mice. Altogether, the results are suggesting that treatment of APP/E4/Abca1+/- mice with LXR agonist T0 ameliorates APOE4-induced AD-like pathology and therefore targeting the LXR-ABCA1-APOE regulatory axis could be effective as a potential therapeutic approach in AD patients, carriers of APOEε4.

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<![CDATA[Multi-Ethnic Analysis of Lipid-Associated Loci: The NHLBI CARe Project]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da97ab0ee8fa60ba26aa

Background

Whereas it is well established that plasma lipid levels have substantial heritability within populations, it remains unclear how many of the genetic determinants reported in previous studies (largely performed in European American cohorts) are relevant in different ethnicities.

Methodology/Principal Findings

We tested a set of ∼50,000 polymorphisms from ∼2,000 candidate genes and genetic loci from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for association with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) in 25,000 European Americans and 9,000 African Americans in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe). We replicated associations for a number of genes in one or both ethnicities and identified a novel lipid-associated variant in a locus harboring ICAM1. We compared the architecture of genetic loci associated with lipids in both African Americans and European Americans and found that the same genes were relevant across ethnic groups but the specific associated variants at each gene often differed.

Conclusions/Significance

We identify or provide further evidence for a number of genetic determinants of plasma lipid levels through population association studies. In many loci the determinants appear to differ substantially between African Americans and European Americans.

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<![CDATA[Association between Birth Interval and Cardiovascular Outcomes at 30 Years of Age: A Prospective Cohort Study from Brazil]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da3fab0ee8fa60b89823

Background

Birth interval is an important and potentially modifiable factor that is associated with child health. Whether an association exists with longer-term outcomes in adults is less well known.

Methods

Using the 1982 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort Study, the association of birth interval with markers of cardiovascular health at 30 years of age was examined. Multivariable linear regression was used with birth interval as a continuous variable and categorical variable, and effect modification by gender was explored.

Results

Birth interval and cardiovascular data were present for 2,239 individuals. With birth interval as a continuous variable, no association was found but stratification by gender tended to show stronger associations for girls. When compared to birth intervals of <18 months, as binary variable, longer intervals were associated with increases in height (1.6 cm; 95% CI: 0.5, 2.8) and lean mass (1.7 kg; 95% CI: 0.2, 3.2). No difference was seen with other cardiovascular outcomes.

Conclusions

An association was generally not found between birth interval and cardiovascular outcomes at 30 years of age, though some evidence existed for differences between males and females and for an association with height and lean mass for birth intervals of 18 months and longer.

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<![CDATA[COPD Exacerbation Biomarkers Validated Using Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db10ab0ee8fa60bcc086

Background

Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) result in considerable morbidity and mortality. However, there are no objective biomarkers to diagnose AECOPD.

Methods

We used multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry to quantify 129 distinct proteins in plasma samples from patients with COPD. This analytical approach was first performed in a biomarker cohort of patients hospitalized with AECOPD (Cohort A, n = 72). Proteins differentially expressed between AECOPD and convalescent states were chosen using a false discovery rate <0.01 and fold change >1.2. Protein selection and classifier building were performed using an elastic net logistic regression model. The performance of the biomarker panel was then tested in two independent AECOPD cohorts (Cohort B, n = 37, and Cohort C, n = 109) using leave-pair-out cross-validation methods.

Results

Five proteins were identified distinguishing AECOPD and convalescent states in Cohort A. Biomarker scores derived from this model were significantly higher during AECOPD than in the convalescent state in the discovery cohort (p<0.001). The receiver operating characteristic cross-validation area under the curve (CV-AUC) statistic was 0.73 in Cohort A, while in the replication cohorts the CV-AUC was 0.77 for Cohort B and 0.79 for Cohort C.

Conclusions

A panel of five biomarkers shows promise in distinguishing AECOPD from convalescence and may provide the basis for a clinical blood test to diagnose AECOPD. Further validation in larger cohorts is necessary for future clinical translation.

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