ResearchPad - lysosomes https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Odiparcil, a potential glycosaminoglycans clearance therapy in mucopolysaccharidosis VI—Evidence from <i>in vitro</i> and <i>in vivo</i> models]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14726 Mucopolysaccharidoses are a class of lysosomal storage diseases, characterized by enzymatic deficiency in the degradation of specific glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Pathological accumulation of excess GAG leads to multiple clinical symptoms with systemic character, most severely affecting bones, muscles and connective tissues. Current therapies include periodic intravenous infusion of supplementary recombinant enzyme (Enzyme Replacement Therapy–ERT) or bone marrow transplantation. However, ERT has limited efficacy due to poor penetration in some organs and tissues. Here, we investigated the potential of the β-D-xyloside derivative odiparcil as an oral GAG clearance therapy for Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome (Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, MPS VI). In vitro, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, odiparcil stimulated the secretion of sulphated GAG into culture media, mainly of chondroitin sulphate (CS) /dermatan sulphate (DS) type. Efficacy of odiparcil in reducing intracellular GAG content was investigated in skin fibroblasts from MPS VI patients where odiparcil was shown to reduce efficiently the accumulation of intracellular CS with an EC50 in the range of 1 μM. In vivo, in wild type rats, after oral administrations, odiparcil was well distributed, achieving μM concentrations in MPS VI disease-relevant tissues and organs (bone, cartilage, heart and cornea). In MPS VI Arylsulphatase B deficient mice (Arsb-), after chronic oral administration, odiparcil consistently stimulated the urinary excretion of sulphated GAG throughout the treatment period and significantly reduced tissue GAG accumulation in liver and kidney. Furthermore, odiparcil diminished the pathological cartilage thickening observed in trachea and femoral growth plates of MPS VI mice. The therapeutic efficacy of odiparcil was similar in models of early (treatment starting in juvenile, 4 weeks old mice) or established disease (treatment starting in adult, 3 months old mice). Our data demonstrate that odiparcil effectively diverts the synthesis of cellular glycosaminoglycans into secreted soluble species and this effect can be used for reducing cellular and tissue GAG accumulation in MPS VI models. Therefore, our data reveal the potential of odiparcil as an oral GAG clearance therapy for MPS VI patients.

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<![CDATA[Betanin purification from red beetroots and evaluation of its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity on LPS-activated microglial cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13861 Microglial activation can release free radicals and various pro-inflammatory cytokines, which implicates the progress of a neurodegenerative disease. Therefore suppression of microglial activation can be an appropriate strategy for combating neurodegenerative diseases. Betanin is a red food dye that acts as free radical scavenger and can be a promising candidate for this purpose. In this study, purification of betanin from red beetroots was carried out by normal phase colum chromatography, yielding 500 mg of betanin from 100 g of red beetroot. The purified betanin was evaluated by TLC, UV-visible, HPLC, ESI-MASS, FT-IR spectroscopy. Investigation on the inhibitory effect of betanin on activated microglia was performed using primary microglial culture. The results showed that betanin significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide induced microglial function including the production of nitric oxide free radicals, reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). Moreover, betanin modulated mitochondrial membrane potential, lysosomal membrane permeabilization and adenosine triphosphate. We further investigated the interaction of betanin with TNF-α, IL-6 and Nitric oxide synthase (iNOS or NOS2) using in silico molecular docking analysis. The docking results demonstrated that betanin have significant negative binding energy against active sites of TNF-α, IL-6 and iNOS.

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<![CDATA[Control of basal autophagy rate by vacuolar peduncle]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c67309ed5eed0c484f37df3

Basal autophagy is as a compressive catabolic mechanism engaged in the breakdown of damaged macromolecules and organelles leading to the recycling of elementary nutrients. Thought essential to cellular refreshing, little is known about the origin of a constitutional rate of basal autophagy. Here, we found that loss of Drosophila vacuolar peduncle (vap), a presumed GAP enzyme, is associated with enhanced basal autophagy rate and physiological alterations resulting in a wasteful cell energy balance, a hallmark of overactive autophagy. By contrast, starvation-induced autophagy was disrupted in vap mutant conditions, leading to a block of maturation into autolysosomes. This phenotype stem for exacerbated biogenesis of PI(3)P-dependent endomembranes, including autophagosome membranes and ectopic fusions of vesicles. These findings shed new light on the neurodegenerative phenotype found associated to mutant vap adult brains in a former study. A partner of Vap, Sprint (Spri), acting as an endocytic GEF for Rab5, had the converse effect of leading to a reduction in PI(3)P-dependent endomembrane formation in mutants. Spri was conditional to normal basal autophagy and instrumental to the starvation-sensitivity phenotype specific of vap. Rab5 activity itself was essential for PI(3)P and for pre-autophagosome structures formation. We propose that Vap/Spri complexes promote a cell surface-derived flow of endocytic Rab5-containing vesicles, the traffic of which is crucial for the implementation of a basal autophagy rate.

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<![CDATA[Fluctuations in cell density alter protein markers of multiple cellular compartments, confounding experimental outcomes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c61e8c6d5eed0c48496f14c

The life cycle of cultured proliferating cells is characterized by fluctuations in cell population density induced by periodic subculturing. This leads to corresponding changes in micro- and macroenvironment of the cells, accompanied by altered cellular metabolism, growth rate and locomotion. Studying cell density-dependent morphological, physiological and biochemical fluctuations is relevant for understanding basic cellular mechanisms and for uncovering the intrinsic variation of commonly used tissue culture experimental models. Using multiple cell lines, we found that expression levels of the autophagic markers p62 and LC3II, and lysosomal enzyme cathepsin D were altered in highly confluent cells as a consequence of nutrient depletion and cell crowding, which led to inactivation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Furthermore, both Lamp1 and active focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were reduced in high-density cells, while chemical inhibition or deletion of FAK led to alterations in lysosomal and autophagic proteins, as well as in the mTOR signaling. This was accompanied by alterations in the Hippo signaling pathway, while cell cycle checkpoint regulator p-cdc2 remained unaffected in at least one studied cell line. On the other hand, allometric scaling of cellular compartments in growing cell populations resulted in biochemically detectable changes in the plasma membrane proteins Na+K+-ATPase and cadherin, and nuclear proteins HDAC1 and Lamin B1. Finally, we demonstrate how treatment-induced changes in cell density and corresponding modulation of susceptible proteins may lead to ambiguous experimental outcomes, or erroneous interpretation of cell culture data. Together, our data emphasize the need to recognize cell density as an important experimental variable in order to improve scientific rigor of cell culture-based studies.

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<![CDATA[The type III intermediate filament vimentin regulates organelle distribution and modulates autophagy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b52e2d5eed0c4842bd1ca

The cytoskeletal protein vimentin plays a key role in positioning of organelles within the cytosol and has been linked to the regulation of numerous cellular processes including autophagy, however, how vimentin regulates autophagy remains relatively unexplored. Here we report that inhibition of vimentin using the steroidal lactone Withaferin A (WFA) causes vimentin to aggregate, and this is associated with the relocalisation of organelles including autophagosomes and lysosomes from the cytosol to a juxtanuclear location. Vimentin inhibition causes autophagosomes to accumulate, and we demonstrate this results from modulation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTORC1) activity, and disruption of autophagosome-lysosome fusion. We suggest that vimentin plays a physiological role in autophagosome and lysosome positioning, thus identifying vimentin as a key factor in the regulation of mTORC1 and autophagy.

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<![CDATA[The role of microtubules and the dynein/dynactin motor complex of host cells in the biogenesis of the Coxiella burnetii-containing vacuole]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c466526d5eed0c484517b0f

Microtubules (Mts) are dynamic cytoskeleton structures that play a key role in vesicular transport. The Mts-mediated transport depends on motor proteins named kinesins and the dynein/dynactin motor complex. The Rab7 adapter protein FYCO1 controls the anterograde transport of the endocytic compartments through the interaction with the kinesin KIF5. Rab7 and its partner RILP induce the recruitment of dynein/dynactin to late endosomes regulating its retrograde transport to the perinuclear area to fuse with lysosomes. The late endosomal-lysosomal fusion is regulated by the HOPS complex through its interaction with RILP and the GTPase Arl8. Coxiella burnetii (Cb), the causative agent of Q fever, is an obligate intracellular pathogen, which generates a large compartment with autophagolysosomal characteristics named Cb-containing vacuole (CCV). The CCV forms through homotypic fusion between small non-replicative CCVs (nrCCV) and through heterotypic fusion with other compartments, such as endosomes and lysosomes. In this work, we characterise the role of Mts, motor proteins, RILP/Rab7 and Arl8 on the CCV biogenesis. The formation of the CCV was affected when either the dynamics and/or the acetylation state of Mts were modified. Similarly, the overexpression of the dynactin subunit non-functional mutants p150Glued and RILP led to the formation of small nrCCVs. This phenomenon is not observed in cells overexpressing WT proteins, the motor KIF5 or its interacting protein FYCO1. The formation of the CCV was normal in infected cells that overexpressed Arl8 alone or together with hVps41 (a HOPS subunit) or in cells co-overexpressing hVps41 and RILP. The dominant negative mutant of Arl8 and the non-functional hVps41 inhibited the formation of the CCV. When the formation of CCV was affected, the bacterial multiplication diminished. Our results suggest that nrCCVs recruit the molecular machinery that regulate the Mts-dependent retrograde transport, Rab7/RILP and the dynein/dynactin system, as well as the tethering processes such as HOPS complex and Arl8 to finally originate the CCV where C. burnetii multiplies.

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<![CDATA[The ESCRT and autophagy machineries cooperate to repair ESX-1-dependent damage at the Mycobacterium-containing vacuole but have opposite impact on containing the infection]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6059d0d5eed0c4847cbf91

Phagocytic cells capture and kill most invader microbes within the bactericidal phagosome, but some pathogens subvert killing by damaging the compartment and escaping to the cytosol. To prevent the leakage of pathogen virulence and host defence factors, as well as bacteria escape, host cells have to contain and repair the membrane damage, or finally eliminate the cytosolic bacteria. All eukaryotic cells engage various repair mechanisms to ensure plasma membrane integrity and proper compartmentalization of organelles, including the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) and autophagy machineries. We show that during infection of Dictyostelium discoideum with Mycobacterium marinum, the ESCRT-I component Tsg101, the ESCRT-III protein Snf7/Chmp4/Vps32 and the AAA-ATPase Vps4 are recruited to sites of damage at the Mycobacterium-containing vacuole. Interestingly, damage separately recruits the ESCRT and the autophagy machineries. In addition, the recruitment of Vps32 and Vps4 to repair sterile membrane damage depends on Tsg101 but appears independent of Ca2+. Finally, in absence of Tsg101, M. marinum accesses prematurely the cytosol, where the autophagy machinery restricts its growth. We propose that ESCRT has an evolutionary conserved function to repair small membrane damage and to contain intracellular pathogens in intact compartments.

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<![CDATA[STAT6 degradation and ubiquitylated TRIML2 are essential for activation of human oncogenic herpesvirus]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c181346d5eed0c4847749b0

Aberrations in STAT6-mediated signaling are linked to the development of multiple cancer types. Increasing evidence has shown that activation of human oncogenic herpesvirus lytic replication is crucial for viral tumorigenesis. However, the role of STAT6 in herpesvirus lytic replication remains elusive. Here, by using Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) as a model, we revealed that RTA, the master regulator of lytic replication, interacts with STAT6 and promotes lysine 48 (K48) and K63-linked ubiquitylation of STAT6 for degradation via the proteasome and lysosome systems. Moreover, degradation of STAT6 is dramatically associated with the increased ubiquitylated form of tripartite motif family like 2 (TRIML2, a tumor suppressor) for prolonged cell survival and virion production, which is also commonly observed in lytic activation of Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus 1 and cytomegalovirus. These results suggest that degradation of STAT6 is important for the lytic activation of KSHV and as such, may be an attractive therapeutic target.

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<![CDATA[Function and regulation of the Caenorhabditis elegans Rab32 family member GLO-1 in lysosome-related organelle biogenesis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5bf3295ed5eed0c4843beab4

Cell type-specific modifications of conventional endosomal trafficking pathways lead to the formation of lysosome-related organelles (LROs). C. elegans gut granules are intestinally restricted LROs that coexist with conventional degradative lysosomes. The formation of gut granules requires the Rab32 family member GLO-1. We show that the loss of glo-1 leads to the mistrafficking of gut granule proteins but does not significantly alter conventional endolysosome biogenesis. GLO-3 directly binds to CCZ-1 and they both function to promote the gut granule association of GLO-1, strongly suggesting that together, GLO-3 and CCZ-1 activate GLO-1. We found that a point mutation in GLO-1 predicted to spontaneously activate, and function independently of it guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), localizes to gut granules and partially restores gut granule protein localization in ccz-1(-) and glo-3(-) mutants. CCZ-1 forms a heterodimeric complex with SAND-1(MON1), which does not function in gut granule formation, to activate RAB-7 in trafficking pathways to conventional lysosomes. Therefore, our data suggest a model whereby the function of a Rab GEF can be altered by subunit exchange. glo-3(-) mutants, which retain low levels of GLO-3 activity, generate gut granules that lack GLO-1 and improperly accumulate RAB-7 in a SAND-1 dependent process. We show that GLO-1 and GLO-3 restrict the distribution of RAB-7 to conventional endolysosomes, providing insights into the segregation of pathways leading to conventional lysosomes and LROs.

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<![CDATA[Therapeutic potential of CPI-613 for targeting tumorous mitochondrial energy metabolism and inhibiting autophagy in clear cell sarcoma]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b28b8b3463d7e14181b1865

Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is an aggressive type of soft tissue tumor that is associated with high rates of metastasis. In the present study, we found that CPI-613, which targets tumorous mitochondrial energy metabolism, induced autophagosome formation followed by lysosome fusion in HS-MM CCS cells in vitro. Interestingly, CPI-613 along with chloroquine, which inhibits the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, significantly induced necrosis of HS-MM CCS cell growth in vitro. Subsequently, we established a murine orthotropic metastatic model of CCS and evaluated the putative suppressive effect of a combination of CPI-613 and chloroquine on CCS progression. Injection of HS-MM into the aponeuroses of the thigh, the most frequently affected site in CCS, resulted in massive metastasis in SCID-beige mice. By contrast, intraperitoneal administration of CPI-613 (25 mg/kg) and chloroquine (50 mg/kg), two days a week for two weeks, significantly decreased tumor growth at the injection site and abolished metastasis. The present results imply the inhibitory effects of a combination of CPI-613 and chloroquine on the progression of CCS.

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<![CDATA[Identification of Putative Receptors for the Novel Adipokine CTRP3 Using Ligand-Receptor Capture Technology]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da9fab0ee8fa60ba53e2

C1q TNF Related Protein 3 (CTRP3) is a member of a family of secreted proteins that exert a multitude of biological effects. Our initial work identified CTRP3’s promise as an effective treatment for Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Specifically, we demonstrated that mice fed a high fat diet failed to develop NAFLD when treated with CTRP3. The purpose of this current project is to identify putative receptors which mediate the hepatic actions of CTRP3.

Methods

We used Ligand-receptor glycocapture technology with TriCEPS™-based ligand-receptor capture (LRC-TriCEPS; Dualsystems Biotech AG). The LRC-TriCEPS experiment with CTRP3-FLAG protein as ligand and insulin as a control ligand was performed on the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell line.

Results

Initial analysis demonstrated efficient coupling of TriCEPS to CTRP3. Further, flow cytometry analysis (FACS) demonstrated successful oxidation and crosslinking of CTRP3-TriCEPS and Insulin-TriCEPS complexes to cell surface glycans. Demonstrating the utility of TriCEPS under these conditions, the insulin receptor was identified in the control dataset. In the CTRP3 treated cells a total enrichment of 261 peptides was observed. From these experiments 5 putative receptors for CTRP3 were identified with two reaching statistically significance: Lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) and Lysosome membrane protein 2 (LIMP II). Follow-up Co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the association between LAMP1 and CTRP3 and further testing using a polyclonal antibody to block potential binding sites of LAMP1 prevented CTRP3 binding to the cells.

Conclusion

The LRC-TriCEPS methodology was successful in identifying potential novel receptors for CTRP3.

Relevance

The identification of the receptors for CTRP3 are important prerequisites for the development of small molecule drug candidates, of which none currently exist, for the treatment NAFLD.

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<![CDATA[Mutations of RagA GTPase in mTORC1 Pathway Are Associated with Autosomal Dominant Cataracts]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da6fab0ee8fa60b941cb

Cataracts are a significant public health problem with no proven methods for prevention. Discovery of novel disease mechanisms to delineate new therapeutic targets is of importance in cataract prevention and therapy. Herein, we report that mutations in the RagA GTPase (RRAGA), a key regulator of the mechanistic rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), are associated with autosomal dominant cataracts. We performed whole exome sequencing in a family with autosomal dominant juvenile-onset cataracts, and identified a novel p.Leu60Arg mutation in RRAGA that co-segregated with the disease, after filtering against the dbSNP database, and at least 123,000 control chromosomes from public and in-house exome databases. In a follow-up direct screening of RRAGA in another 22 families and 142 unrelated patients with congenital or juvenile-onset cataracts, RRAGA was found to be mutated in two unrelated patients (p.Leu60Arg and c.-16G>A respectively). Functional studies in human lens epithelial cells revealed that the RRAGA mutations exerted deleterious effects on mTORC1 signaling, including increased relocation of RRAGA to the lysosomes, up-regulated mTORC1 phosphorylation, down-regulated autophagy, altered cell growth or compromised promoter activity. These data indicate that the RRAGA mutations, associated with autosomal dominant cataracts, play a role in the disease by acting through disruption of mTORC1 signaling.

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<![CDATA[Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles for Brain Delivery of High Molecular Weight Molecules in Lysosomal Storage Disorders]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db07ab0ee8fa60bc89c5

Lysosomal Storage Disorders (LSDs) are a group of metabolic syndromes, each one due to the deficit of one lysosomal enzyme. Many LSDs affect most of the organ systems and overall about 75% of the patients present neurological impairment. Enzyme Replacement Therapy, although determining some systemic clinical improvements, is ineffective on the CNS disease, due to enzymes' inability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). With the aim to deliver the therapeutic enzymes across the BBB, we here assayed biodegradable and biocompatible PLGA-nanoparticles (NPs) in two murine models for LSDs, Mucopolysaccharidosis type I and II (MPS I and MPS II). PLGA-NPs were modified with a 7-aminoacid glycopeptide (g7), yet demonstrated to be able to deliver low molecular weight (MW) molecules across the BBB in rodents. We specifically investigated, for the first time, the g7-NPs ability to transfer a model drug (FITC-albumin) with a high MW, comparable to the enzymes to be delivered for LSDs brain therapy. In vivo experiments, conducted on wild-type mice and knockout mouse models for MPS I and II, also included a whole series of control injections to obtain a broad preliminary view of the procedure efficiency. Results clearly showed efficient BBB crossing of albumin in all injected mice, underlying the ability of NPs to deliver high MW molecules to the brain. These results encourage successful experiments with enzyme-loaded g7-NPs to deliver sufficient amounts of the drug to the brain district on LSDs, where exerting a corrective effect on the pathological phenotype.

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<![CDATA[The Trypanosome Exocyst: A Conserved Structure Revealing a New Role in Endocytosis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db54ab0ee8fa60bdd0d0

Membrane transport is an essential component of pathogenesis for most infectious organisms. In African trypanosomes, transport to and from the plasma membrane is closely coupled to immune evasion and antigenic variation. In mammals and fungi an octameric exocyst complex mediates late steps in exocytosis, but comparative genomics suggested that trypanosomes retain only six canonical subunits, implying mechanistic divergence. We directly determined the composition of the Trypanosoma brucei exocyst by affinity isolation and demonstrate that the parasite complex is nonameric, retaining all eight canonical subunits (albeit highly divergent at the sequence level) plus a novel essential subunit, Exo99. Exo99 and Sec15 knockdowns have remarkably similar phenotypes in terms of viability and impact on morphology and trafficking pathways. Significantly, both Sec15 and Exo99 have a clear function in endocytosis, and global proteomic analysis indicates an important role in maintaining the surface proteome. Taken together these data indicate additional exocyst functions in trypanosomes, which likely include endocytosis, recycling and control of surface composition. Knockdowns in HeLa cells suggest that the role in endocytosis is shared with metazoan cells. We conclude that, whilst the trypanosome exocyst has novel components, overall functionality appears conserved, and suggest that the unique subunit may provide therapeutic opportunities.

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<![CDATA[Identification of small molecules that disrupt vacuolar function in the pathogen Candida albicans]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db51ab0ee8fa60bdc421

The fungal vacuole is a large acidified organelle that performs a variety of cellular functions. At least a sub-set of these functions are crucial for pathogenic species of fungi, such as Candida albicans, to survive within and invade mammalian tissue as mutants with severe defects in vacuolar biogenesis are avirulent. We therefore sought to identify chemical probes that disrupt the normal function and/or integrity of the fungal vacuole to provide tools for the functional analysis of this organelle as well as potential experimental therapeutics. A convenient indicator of vacuolar integrity based upon the intracellular accumulation of an endogenously produced pigment was adapted to identify Vacuole Disrupting chemical Agents (VDAs). Several chemical libraries were screened and a set of 29 compounds demonstrated to reproducibly cause loss of pigmentation, including 9 azole antifungals, a statin and 3 NSAIDs. Quantitative analysis of vacuolar morphology revealed that (excluding the azoles) a sub-set of 14 VDAs significantly alter vacuolar number, size and/or shape. Many C. albicans mutants with impaired vacuolar function are deficient in the formation of hyphal elements, a process essential for its pathogenicity. Accordingly, all 14 VDAs negatively impact C. albicans hyphal morphogenesis. Fungal selectivity was observed for approximately half of the VDA compounds identified, since they did not alter the morphology of the equivalent mammalian organelle, the lysosome. Collectively, these compounds comprise of a new collection of chemical probes that directly or indirectly perturb normal vacuolar function in C. albicans.

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<![CDATA[High Content Analysis Provides Mechanistic Insights on the Pathways of Toxicity Induced by Amine-Modified Polystyrene Nanoparticles]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9feab0ee8fa60b7324b

The fast-paced development of nanotechnology needs the support of effective safety testing. We have developed a screening platform measuring simultaneously several cellular parameters for exposure to various concentrations of nanoparticles (NPs). Cell lines representative of different organ cell types, including lung, endothelium, liver, kidney, macrophages, glia, and neuronal cells were exposed to 50 nm amine-modified polystyrene (PS-NH2) NPs previously reported to induce apoptosis and to 50 nm sulphonated and carboxyl-modified polystyrene NPs that were reported to be silent. All cell lines apart from Raw 264.7 executed apoptosis in response to PS-NH2 NPs, showing specific sequences of EC50 thresholds; lysosomal acidification was the most sensitive parameter. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and plasma membrane integrity measured by High Content Analysis resulted comparably sensitive to the equivalent OECD-recommended assays, allowing increased output. Analysis of the acidic compartments revealed good cerrelation between size/fluorescence intensity and dose of PS-NH2 NPs applied; moreover steatosis and phospholipidosis were observed, consistent with the lysosomal alterations revealed by Lysotracker green; similar responses were observed when comparing astrocytoma cells with primary astrocytes. We have established a platform providing mechanistic insights on the response to exposure to nanoparticles. Such platform holds great potential for in vitro screening of nanomaterials in highthroughput format.

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<![CDATA[Scavenger Receptor C Mediates Phagocytosis of White Spot Syndrome Virus and Restricts Virus Proliferation in Shrimp]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da74ab0ee8fa60b95e0f

Scavenger receptors are an important class of pattern recognition receptors that play several important roles in host defense against pathogens. The class C scavenger receptors (SRCs) have only been identified in a few invertebrates, and their role in the immune response against viruses is seldom studied. In this study, we firstly identified an SRC from kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus, designated MjSRC, which was significantly upregulated after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge at the mRNA and protein levels in hemocytes. The quantity of WSSV increased in shrimp after knockdown of MjSRC, compared with the controls. Furthermore, overexpression of MjSRC led to enhanced WSSV elimination via phagocytosis by hemocytes. Pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the interaction between MjSRC and the WSSV envelope protein. Electron microscopy observation indicated that the colloidal gold-labeled extracellular domain of MjSRC was located on the outer surface of WSSV. MjSRC formed a trimer and was internalized into the cytoplasm after WSSV challenge, and the internalization was strongly inhibited after knockdown of Mjβ-arrestin2. Further studies found that Mjβ-arrestin2 interacted with the intracellular domain of MjSRC and induced the internalization of WSSV in a clathrin-dependent manner. WSSV were co-localized with lysosomes in hemocytes and the WSSV quantity in shrimp increased after injection of lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine. Collectively, this study demonstrated that MjSRC recognized WSSV via its extracellular domain and invoked hemocyte phagocytosis to restrict WSSV systemic infection. This is the first study to report an SRC as a pattern recognition receptor promoting phagocytosis of a virus.

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<![CDATA[Carboxyl-Terminal SSLKG Motif of the Human Cystinosin-LKG Plays an Important Role in Plasma Membrane Sorting]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da3eab0ee8fa60b88d88

Cystinosin mediates an ATP-dependent cystine efflux from lysosomes and causes, if mutated, nephropathic cystinosis, a rare inherited lysosomal storage disease. Alternative splicing of the last exon of the cystinosin sequence produces the cystinosin-LKG isoform that is characterized by a different C-terminal region causing changes in the subcellular distribution of the protein. We have constructed RFP-tagged proteins and demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis that the carboxyl-terminal SSLKG sequence of cystinosin-LKG is an important sorting motif that is required for efficient targeting the protein to the plasma membrane, where it can mediate H+ coupled cystine transport. Deletion of the SSLKG sequence reduced cystinosin-LKG expression in the plasma membrane and cystine transport by approximately 30%, and induced significant accumulation of the protein in the Golgi apparatus and in lysosomes. Cystinosin-LKG, unlike the canonical isoform, also moves to the lysosomes by the indirect pathway, after endocytic retrieval from the plasma membrane, mainly by a clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Nevertheless, silencing of AP-2 triggers the clathrin-independent endocytosis, showing the complex adaptability of cystinosin-LKG trafficking.

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<![CDATA[Hypoxia Induces Autophagy through Translational Up-Regulation of Lysosomal Proteins in Human Colon Cancer Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4aab0ee8fa60bd9e92

Hypoxia occurs in a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis. Tumor cells have to adapt to hypoxia by altering their gene expression and protein synthesis. Here, we showed that hypoxia inhibits translation through activation of PERK and inactivation of mTOR in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Prolonged hypoxia (1% O2, 16 h) dramatically inhibits general translation in HCT116 cells, yet selected mRNAs remain efficiently translated under such a condition. Using microarray analysis of polysome- associated mRNAs, we identified a large number of hypoxia-regulated genes at the translational level. Efficiently translated mRNAs during hypoxia were validated by polysome profiling and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of the up-regulated genes are involved in lysosome, glycan and lipid metabolism, antigen presentation, cell adhesion, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. The majority of down-regulated genes are involved in apoptosis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation. Further investigation showed that hypoxia induces lysosomal autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction through translational regulation in HCT116 cells. The abundance of several translation factors and the mTOR kinase activity are involved in hypoxia-induced mitochondrial autophagy in HCT116 cells. Our studies highlight the importance of translational regulation for tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia.

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<![CDATA[Geranylated 4-Phenylcoumarins Exhibit Anticancer Effects against Human Prostate Cancer Cells through Caspase-Independent Mechanism]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dad7ab0ee8fa60bb863d

Geranylated 4-phenylcoumarins, DMDP-1 & -2 isolated from Mesua elegans were investigated for anticancer potential against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 resulted in cell death in a time and dose dependent manner in an MTT assay on all cancer cell lines tested with the exception of lung adenocarcinoma cells. DMDP-1 showed highest cytotoxic efficacy in PC-3 cells while DMDP-2 was most potent in DU 145 cells. Flow cytometry indicated that both coumarins were successful to induce programmed cell death after 24 h treatment. Elucidation on the mode-of-action via protein arrays and western blotting demonstrated death induced without any significant expressions of caspases, Bcl-2 family proteins and cleaved PARP, thus suggesting the involvement of caspase-independent pathways. In identifying autophagy, analysis of GFP-LC3 showed increased punctate in PC-3 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-1. In these cells decreased expression of autophagosome protein, p62 and cathepsin B further confirmed autophagy. In contrary, the DU 145 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-2 has reduced GFP-LC3 punctate although the number of cells with obvious GFP-LC3 puncta was significantly increased in the inhibitor-treated cells. The increase level of p62 suggested leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol to trigger potential downstream death mediators. This correlated with increased expression of cathepsin B and reduced expression after treatment with its inhibitor, CA074. Also auto-degradation of calpain-2 upon treatment with DMDP-1 &-2 and its inhibitor alone, calpeptin compared with the combination treatment, further confirmed involvement of calpain-2 in PC-3 and DU 145 cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 also showed up-regulation of total and phosphorylated p53 levels in a time dependent manner. Hence, DMDP-1 & -2 showed ability to activate multiple death pathways involving autophagy, lysosomal and endoplasmic reticulum death proteins which could potentially be manipulated to develop anti-cancer therapy in apoptosis resistant cells.

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