ResearchPad - methart https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Phen2Gene: rapid phenotype-driven gene prioritization for rare diseases]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_16194 Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) terms are increasingly used in diagnostic settings to aid in the characterization of patient phenotypes. The HPO annotation database is updated frequently and can provide detailed phenotype knowledge on various human diseases, and many HPO terms are now mapped to candidate causal genes with binary relationships. To further improve the genetic diagnosis of rare diseases, we incorporated these HPO annotations, gene–disease databases and gene–gene databases in a probabilistic model to build a novel HPO-driven gene prioritization tool, Phen2Gene. Phen2Gene accesses a database built upon this information called the HPO2Gene Knowledgebase (H2GKB), which provides weighted and ranked gene lists for every HPO term. Phen2Gene is then able to access the H2GKB for patient-specific lists of HPO terms or PhenoPacket descriptions supported by GA4GH (http://phenopackets.org/), calculate a prioritized gene list based on a probabilistic model and output gene–disease relationships with great accuracy. Phen2Gene outperforms existing gene prioritization tools in speed and acts as a real-time phenotype-driven gene prioritization tool to aid the clinical diagnosis of rare undiagnosed diseases. In addition to a command line tool released under the MIT license (https://github.com/WGLab/Phen2Gene), we also developed a web server and web service (https://phen2gene.wglab.org/) for running the tool via web interface or RESTful API queries. Finally, we have curated a large amount of benchmarking data for phenotype-to-gene tools involving 197 patients across 76 scientific articles and 85 patients’ de-identified HPO term data from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

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<![CDATA[Poly-Enrich: count-based methods for gene set enrichment testing with genomic regions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N9e48f919-f174-46d0-ba9b-55ef1ea9bb53

Abstract

Gene set enrichment (GSE) testing enhances the biological interpretation of ChIP-seq data and other large sets of genomic regions. Our group has previously introduced two GSE methods for genomic regions: ChIP-Enrich for narrow regions and Broad-Enrich for broad regions. Here, we introduce Poly-Enrich, which has wider applicability, additional capabilities and models the number of peaks assigned to a gene using a generalized additive model with a negative binomial family to determine gene set enrichment, while adjusting for gene locus length. As opposed to ChIP-Enrich, Poly-Enrich works well even when nearly all genes have a peak, illustrated by using Poly-Enrich to characterize pathways and types of genic regions enriched with different families of repetitive elements. By comparing Poly-Enrich and ChIP-Enrich results with ENCODE ChIP-seq data, we found that the optimal test depends more on the pathway being regulated than on properties of the transcription factors. Using known transcription factor functions, we discovered clusters of related biological processes consistently better modeled with Poly-Enrich. This suggests that the regulation of certain processes may be modified by multiple binding events, better modeled by a count-based method. Our new hybrid method automatically uses the optimal method for each gene set, with correct FDR-adjustment.

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