ResearchPad - motion https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Robust pollution source parameter identification based on the artificial bee colony algorithm using a wireless sensor network]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14751 Pollution source parameter identification (PSPI) is significant for pollution control, since it can provide important information and save a lot of time for subsequent pollution elimination works. For solving the PSPI problem, a large number of pollution sensor nodes can be rapidly deployed to cover a large area and form a wireless sensor network (WSN). Based on the measurements of WSN, least-squares estimation methods can solve the PSPI problem by searching for the solution that minimize the sum of squared measurement noises. They are independent of the measurement noise distribution, i.e., robust to the noise distribution. To search for the least-squares solution, population-based parallel search techniques usually can overcome the premature convergence problem, which can stagnate the single-point search algorithm. In this paper, we adapt the relatively newly presented artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to solve the WSN-based PSPI problem and verifies its feasibility and robustness. Extensive simulation results show that the ABC and the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm obtained similar identification results in the same simulation scenario. Moreover, the ABC and the PSO achieved much better performance than a traditionally used single-point search algorithm, i.e., the trust-region reflective algorithm.

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<![CDATA[Ethnic disparities in initiation and intensification of diabetes treatment in adults with type 2 diabetes in the UK, 1990–2017: A cohort study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14688 In the UK, ethnic minority populations, particularly of South Asian and black African/Caribbean descent, have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and related adverse outcomes, such as cardiovascular disease, than the white population.Timely and appropriate diabetes treatment can substantially reduce risk of adverse outcomes associated with T2DM.We sought to quantify ethnic differences in time to initiation and intensification of diabetes treatment among individuals newly diagnosed with T2DM to assess whether these clinically modifiable factors may contribute to ethnic differences in outcomes.What did the researchers do and find?We used routinely recorded data from general practices across the UK to identify people newly diagnosed with T2DM and compared how long it took to initiate and intensify diabetes treatment, comparing people of white, South Asian, and black ethnicity.We found that South Asian and black groups initiated diabetes treatment more quickly than white groups but were slower to intensify to second- and third-line treatment regimes.What do these findings mean?Although time to initial treatment of type 2 diabetes was appropriate, ethnic disparities in subsequent longer-term treatment may contribute to the worse outcomes seen in ethnic minority populations in the UK.Interventions to improve timely and appropriate intensification of diabetes treatment are key to reducing disparities in the downstream adverse outcomes of T2DM. ]]> <![CDATA[Conservation laws by virtue of scale symmetries in neural systems]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14657 Considerations of the way in which a dynamical system changes under transformation of scale offer insight into its operational principles. Scale freeness is a paradigm that has been observed in a variety of physical and biological phenomena and describes a situation in which appropriately scaling the space and time coordinates of any evolution of the system yields another possible evolution. In the brain, scale freeness has drawn considerable attention, as it has been associated with optimal information transmission capabilities. Scale symmetry describes a special case of scale freeness, in which a system is perfectly unchanged under transformation of scale. Noether’s theorem tells us that in a system that possesses such a symmetry, an associated conservation law must also exist. Here we show that scale symmetry can be identified, and the related conserved quantities measured, in both simulations and real-world data. We achieve this by deriving a generalised equation of motion that leaves the action invariant under spatiotemporal scale transformations and using a modified version of Noether’s theorem to write the associated family of conservation laws. Our contribution allows for the first such statistical characterisation of the quantity that is conserved purely by virtue of scale symmetry.

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<![CDATA[Can changes in implant macrogeometry accelerate the osseointegration process?: An <i>in vivo</i> experimental biomechanical and histological evaluations]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14638 The propose was to compare this new implant macrogeometry with a control implant with a conventional macrogeometry.Materials and methodsEighty-six conical implants were divided in two groups (n = 43 per group): group control (group CON) that were used conical implants with a conventional macrogeometry and, group test (group TEST) that were used implants with the new macrogeometry. The new implant macrogeometry show several circular healing cambers between the threads, distributed in the implant body. Three implants of each group were used to scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis and, other eighty samples (n = 40 per group) were inserted the tibia of ten rabbit (n = 2 per tibia), determined by randomization. The animals were sacrificed (n = 5 per time) at 3-weeks (Time 1) and at 4-weeks after the implantations (Time 2). The biomechanical evaluation proposed was the measurement of the implant stability quotient (ISQ) and the removal torque values (RTv). The microscopical analysis was a histomorphometric measurement of the bone to implant contact (%BIC) and the SEM evaluation of the bone adhered on the removed implants.ResultsThe results showed that the implants of the group TEST produced a significant enhancement in the osseointegration in comparison with the group CON. The ISQ and RTv tests showed superior values for the group TEST in the both measured times (3- and 4-weeks), with significant differences (p < 0.05). More residual bone in quantity and quality was observed in the samples of the group TEST on the surface of the removed implants. Moreover, the %BIC demonstrated an important increasing for the group TEST in both times, with statistical differences (in Time 1 p = 0.0103 and in Time 2 p < 0.0003).ConclusionsThen, we can conclude that the alterations in the implant macrogeometry promote several benefits on the osseointegration process. ]]> <![CDATA[Discriminant validity of 3D joint kinematics and centre of mass displacement measured by inertial sensor technology during the unipodal stance task]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14569 The unipodal stance task is a clinical task that quantifies postural stability and alignment of the lower limb joints, while weight bearing on one leg. As persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) have poor postural and knee joint stability, objective assessment of this task might be useful.ObjectiveTo investigate the discriminant validity of three-dimensional joint kinematics and centre of mass displacement (COM) between healthy controls and persons with knee KOA, during unipodal stance using inertial sensors. Additionally, the reliability, agreement and construct validity are assessed to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of the discriminating parameters.MethodsTwenty healthy controls and 19 persons with unilateral severe KOA were included. Five repetitions of the unipodal stance task were simultaneously recorded by an inertial sensor system and a camera-based system (gold standard). Statistical significant differences in kinematic waveforms between healthy controls and persons with severe knee KOA were determined using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping (SPM1D).ResultsPersons with severe knee KOA had more lateral trunk lean towards the contralateral leg, more hip flexion throughout the performance of the unipodal stance task, more pelvic obliquity and COM displacement towards the contralateral side. However, for the latter two parameters the minimum detectable change was greater than the difference between healthy controls and persons with severe knee KOA. The construct validity was good (coefficient of multiple correlation 0.75, 0.83 respectively) and the root mean squared error (RMSE) was low (RMSE <1.5°) for the discriminant parameters.ConclusionInertial sensor based movement analysis can discriminate between healthy controls and persons with severe knee KOA for lateral trunk lean and hip flexion, but unfortunately not for the knee angles. Further research is required to improve the reproducibility and accuracy of the inertial sensor measurements before they can be used to assess differences in tasks with a small range of motion. ]]> <![CDATA[The Language of Innovation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_10245 Predicting innovation is a peculiar problem in data science. Following its definition, an innovation is always a never-seen-before event, leaving no room for traditional supervised learning approaches. Here we propose a strategy to address the problem in the context of innovative patents, by defining innovations as never-seen-before associations of technologies and exploiting self-supervised learning techniques. We think of technological codes present in patents as a vocabulary and the whole technological corpus as written in a specific, evolving language. We leverage such structure with techniques borrowed from Natural Language Processing by embedding technologies in a high dimensional euclidean space where relative positions are representative of learned semantics. Proximity in this space is an effective predictor of specific innovation events, that outperforms a wide range of standard link-prediction metrics. The success of patented innovations follows a complex dynamics characterized by different patterns which we analyze in details with specific examples. The methods proposed in this paper provide a completely new way of understanding and forecasting innovation, by tackling it from a revealing perspective and opening interesting scenarios for a number of applications and further analytic approaches.

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<![CDATA[Fuzzy jump wavelet neural network based on rule induction for dynamic nonlinear system identification with real data applications]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Ndb8f5881-c148-4c1d-a8e2-b5151d4191da

Aim

Fuzzy wavelet neural network (FWNN) has proven to be a promising strategy in the identification of nonlinear systems. The network considers both global and local properties, deals with imprecision present in sensory data, leading to desired precisions. In this paper, we proposed a new FWNN model nominated “Fuzzy Jump Wavelet Neural Network” (FJWNN) for identifying dynamic nonlinear-linear systems, especially in practical applications.

Methods

The proposed FJWNN is a fuzzy neural network model of the Takagi-Sugeno-Kang type whose consequent part of fuzzy rules is a linear combination of input regressors and dominant wavelet neurons as a sub-jump wavelet neural network. Each fuzzy rule can locally model both linear and nonlinear properties of a system. The linear relationship between the inputs and the output is learned by neurons with linear activation functions, whereas the nonlinear relationship is locally modeled by wavelet neurons. Orthogonal least square (OLS) method and genetic algorithm (GA) are respectively used to purify the wavelets for each sub-JWNN. In this paper, fuzzy rule induction improves the structure of the proposed model leading to less fuzzy rules, inputs of each fuzzy rule and model parameters. The real-world gas furnace and the real electromyographic (EMG) signal modeling problem are employed in our study. In the same vein, piecewise single variable function approximation, nonlinear dynamic system modeling, and Mackey–Glass time series prediction, ratify this method superiority. The proposed FJWNN model is compared with the state-of-the-art models based on some performance indices such as RMSE, RRSE, Rel ERR%, and VAF%.

Results

The proposed FJWNN model yielded the following results: RRSE (mean±std) of 10e-5±6e-5 for piecewise single-variable function approximation, RMSE (mean±std) of 2.6–4±2.6e-4 for the first nonlinear dynamic system modelling, RRSE (mean±std) of 1.59e-3±0.42e-3 for Mackey–Glass time series prediction, RMSE of 0.3421 for gas furnace modelling and VAF% (mean±std) of 98.24±0.71 for the EMG modelling of all trial signals, indicating a significant enhancement over previous methods.

Conclusions

The FJWNN demonstrated promising accuracy and generalization while moderating network complexity. This improvement is due to applying main useful wavelets in combination with linear regressors and using fuzzy rule induction. Compared to the state-of-the-art models, the proposed FJWNN yielded better performance and, therefore, can be considered a novel tool for nonlinear system identification.

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<![CDATA[The faster, the better? Relationships between run-up speed, the degree of difficulty (D-score), height and length of flight on vault in artistic gymnastics]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c99030dd5eed0c484b98b90

On vault in artistic gymnastics, a high run-up speed is thought to be important when performing difficult vaults. To test this assumption in a large cohort of elite athletes, we calculated the correlations between the run-up speed, scores, height and length of flight for handspring-, Tsukahara- and Yurchenko-style vaults and compared the performances of male and female elite and junior athletes (n = 407) during the 2016 European Championships. In females, run-up speed correlated significantly with the difficulty (D-) score and height of flight for all vaulting styles (r ≤ 0.80). In males, run-up speed correlated significantly with the D-score, height and length of flight of Tsukahara (r ≤ 0.69) and Yurchenko vaults only (r ≤ 0.65). Males reached 8–9% higher run-up speeds performing handspring and Tsukahara vaults than did females, but similar run-up speeds performing Yurchenko vaults. Elite females achieved higher run-up speeds than junior females performing Yurchenko vaults. Elite males displayed higher run-up speeds than junior males performing handspring and Tsukahara vaults. We conclude that, in females, more difficult vaults require higher run-up speeds than vaults with lower D-scores and thus, within the measured range of speeds, the faster the run-up, the better, regardless of vaulting style. Males, on the other hand, may not need to exhaust their sprinting capacity, even for the most difficult vaults. Finally, the knowledge of the required run-up speed for each vault helps coaches to estimate each athlete’s potential and/or to focus the training on developing the required physical qualities.

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<![CDATA[Laws of concatenated perception: Vision goes for novelty, decisions for perseverance]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c88240cd5eed0c484639615

Every instant of perception depends on a cascade of brain processes calibrated to the history of sensory and decisional events. In the present work, we show that human visual perception is constantly shaped by two contrasting forces exerted by sensory adaptation and past decisions. In a series of experiments, we used multilevel modeling and cross-validation approaches to investigate the impact of previous stimuli and decisions on behavioral reports during adjustment and forced-choice tasks. Our results revealed that each perceptual report is permeated by opposite biases from a hierarchy of serially dependent processes: Low-level adaptation repels perception away from previous stimuli, whereas decisional traces attract perceptual reports toward the recent past. In this hierarchy of serial dependence, “continuity fields” arise from the inertia of decisional templates and not from low-level sensory processes. This finding is consistent with a Two-process model of serial dependence in which the persistence of readout weights in a decision unit compensates for sensory adaptation, leading to attractive biases in sequential perception. We propose a unified account of serial dependence in which functionally distinct mechanisms, operating at different stages, promote the differentiation and integration of visual information over time.

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<![CDATA[A computational scheme for internal models not requiring precise system parameters]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c803c6ed5eed0c484ad895a

Utilization by humans of a precise and adaptable internal model of the dynamics of the body in generating movements is a well-supported concept. The prevailing opinion is that such an internal model ceaselessly develops through long-term repetition and accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS). However, a long-term learning process would not be absolutely necessary for the formation of internal models. It is possible to estimate the dynamics of the system by using a motor command and its resulting output, instead of constructing a model of the dynamics with precise parameters. In this study, a computational model is proposed that uses a motor command and its corresponding output to estimate the dynamics of the system and it is examined whether the proposed model is capable of describing a series of empirical movements. The proposed model was found to be capable of describing humans’ fast movements which require compensation for system dynamics as well as sensory delays. In addition, the proposed model shows equifinality under inertial perturbations as seen in several experimental studies. This satisfactory reproducibility of the proposed computation raises the possibility that humans make a movement by estimating the system dynamics with a copy of motor command and sensory output on a momentary basis, without the need to identify precise system parameters.

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<![CDATA[CEO traits, dynamic compensation and capital structure]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dca25d5eed0c48452a840

This paper studies the impact of managerial traits, i.e. optimism, confidence and risk aversion, on capital structure using a principle-agent framework. We discover that optimistic manager perceives equity as more undervalued than debt, while, confident manager perceives debt as more undervalued than equity. We also find that there exists the level of risk aversion eliminating the impact of optimism and confidence on the leverage. Furthermore, in contrast to rational manager, the optimistic/confident manger has higher level of effort. And then, the increasing in risk aversion reduces the level of effort. Our results are in line with some empirical findings.

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<![CDATA[Quality of INR control and switching to non-Vitamin K oral anticoagulants between women and men with atrial fibrillation treated with Vitamin K Antagonists in Spain. A population-based, real-world study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6c75bad5eed0c4843d0092

Background

Worldwide, there is growing evidence that quality of international normalized ratio (INR) control in atrial fibrillation patients treated with Vitamin K Antagonists (VKA) is suboptimal. However, sex disparities in population-based real-world settings have been scarcely studied, as well as patterns of switching to second-line Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC). We aimed to assess the quality of INR control in atrial fibrillation patients treated with VKA in the region of Valencia, Spain, for the whole population and differencing by sex, and to identify factors associated with poor control. We also quantified switching to Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC) and we identified factors associated to switching.

Methods

This is a cross-sectional, population-based study. Information was obtained through linking different regional electronic databases. Outcome measures were Time in Therapeutic Range (TTR) and percentage of INR determinations in range (PINRR) in 2015, and percentage of switching to NOAC in 2016, for the whole population and stratified by sex.

Results

We included 22,629 patients, 50.4% were women. Mean TTR was 62.3% for women and 63.7% for men, and PINNR was 58.3% for women and 60.1% for men (p<0.001). Considering the TTR<65% threshold, 53% of women and 49.3% of men had poor anticoagulation control (p<0.001). Women, long-term users antiplatelet users, and patients with comorbidities, visits to Emergency Department and use of alcohol were more likely to present poor INR control. 5.4% of poorly controlled patients during 2015 switched to a NOAC throughout 2016, with no sex differences.

Conclusion

The quality of INR control of all AF patients treated with VKA in 2015 in our Southern European region was suboptimal, and women were at a higher risk of poor INR control. This reflects sex disparities in care, and programs for improving the quality of oral anticoagulation should incorporate the gender perspective. Clinical inertia may be lying behind the observed low rates of switching in patient with poor INR control.

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<![CDATA[Overcoming the problem of multicollinearity in sports performance data: A novel application of partial least squares correlation analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f1492d5eed0c48467a325

Objectives

Professional sporting organisations invest considerable resources collecting and analysing data in order to better understand the factors that influence performance. Recent advances in non-invasive technologies, such as global positioning systems (GPS), mean that large volumes of data are now readily available to coaches and sport scientists. However analysing such data can be challenging, particularly when sample sizes are small and data sets contain multiple highly correlated variables, as is often the case in a sporting context. Multicollinearity in particular, if not treated appropriately, can be problematic and might lead to erroneous conclusions. In this paper we present a novel ‘leave one variable out’ (LOVO) partial least squares correlation analysis (PLSCA) methodology, designed to overcome the problem of multicollinearity, and show how this can be used to identify the training load (TL) variables that influence most ‘end fitness’ in young rugby league players.

Methods

The accumulated TL of sixteen male professional youth rugby league players (17.7 ± 0.9 years) was quantified via GPS, a micro-electrical-mechanical-system (MEMS), and players’ session-rating-of-perceived-exertion (sRPE) over a 6-week pre-season training period. Immediately prior to and following this training period, participants undertook a 30–15 intermittent fitness test (30-15IFT), which was used to determine a players ‘starting fitness’ and ‘end fitness’. In total twelve TL variables were collected, and these along with ‘starting fitness’ as a covariate were regressed against ‘end fitness’. However, considerable multicollinearity in the data (VIF >1000 for nine variables) meant that the multiple linear regression (MLR) process was unstable and so we developed a novel LOVO PLSCA adaptation to quantify the relative importance of the predictor variables and thus minimise multicollinearity issues. As such, the LOVO PLSCA was used as a tool to inform and refine the MLR process.

Results

The LOVO PLSCA identified the distance accumulated at very-high speed (>7 m·s-1) as being the most important TL variable to influence improvement in player fitness, with this variable causing the largest decrease in singular value inertia (5.93). When included in a refined linear regression model, this variable, along with ‘starting fitness’ as a covariate, explained 73% of the variance in v30-15IFT ‘end fitness’ (p<0.001) and eliminated completely any multicollinearity issues.

Conclusions

The LOVO PLSCA technique appears to be a useful tool for evaluating the relative importance of predictor variables in data sets that exhibit considerable multicollinearity. When used as a filtering tool, LOVO PLSCA produced a MLR model that demonstrated a significant relationship between ‘end fitness’ and the predictor variable ‘accumulated distance at very-high speed’ when ‘starting fitness’ was included as a covariate. As such, LOVO PLSCA may be a useful tool for sport scientists and coaches seeking to analyse data sets obtained using GPS and MEMS technologies.

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<![CDATA[Dynamic stability and stepping strategies of young healthy adults walking on an oscillating treadmill]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dc9dad5eed0c48452a314

Understanding how people modify their stepping to maintain gait stability may provide information on fall risk and help to understand strategies used to reduce loss of balance. The purpose of this study was to identify the stepping strategies healthy young individuals select to maintain balance while walking on a destabilizing surface in various directions. A treadmill mounted on top of a 6 degree-of-freedom motion base was used to generate support surface oscillations in different degrees of freedom and amplitudes. Fifteen healthy young adults (21.3 ± 1.4 years) walked at self-selected speeds while continuous sinusoidal oscillations were imposed to the support surface in a one degree of freedom: rotation or translation in the mediolateral (ML) direction and rotation or translation in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, with each condition repeated at three different amplitudes. We compared step width, length, and frequency and the mean and variability of margin of stability (MoS) during each experimental walking condition with a control condition, in which the support surface was stationary. Subjects chose a common strategy of increasing step width (p < 0.001) and decreasing step length (p = 0.008) while increasing mediolateral MoS (p < 0.001), particularly during oscillations that challenged frontal plane control, with rotations of the walking surface producing the greatest changes to stepping.

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<![CDATA[Modeling financial interval time series]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f148ad5eed0c48467a270

In financial economics, a large number of models are developed based on the daily closing price. When using only the daily closing price to model the time series, we may discard valuable intra-daily information, such as maximum and minimum prices. In this study, we propose an interval time series model, including the daily maximum, minimum, and closing prices, and then apply the proposed model to forecast the entire interval. The likelihood function and the corresponding maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) are obtained by stochastic differential equation and the Girsanov theorem. To capture the heteroscedasticity of volatility, we consider a stochastic volatility model. The efficiency of the proposed estimators is illustrated by a simulation study. Finally, based on real data for S&P 500 index, the proposed method outperforms several alternatives in terms of the accurate forecast.

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<![CDATA[Peak torque angle of anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed knee flexor muscles in patients with semitendinosus and gracilis autograft is shifted towards extension regardless of the postoperative duration of supervised physiotherapy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c633944d5eed0c484ae6385

Background

The observational cohort study investigated whether the flexor muscles peak torque (PT) angle shifting towards extension observed in the involved knee in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) using semitendinosus and gracilis tendon (STGR) autograft is associated with the postoperative physiotherapy supervision duration.

Methods

From 230 ACL-reconstructed males, we identified patients after ACLR utilizing STGR autograft and divided them into those who completed supervised physiotherapy <6 months (Group I; n = 77) and those who completed supervised physiotherapy ≥6 months (Group II; n = 66). The mean follow-up time was 6.84 ± 1.47 months. The ACL-reconstructed patients were compared to 98 controls (Group III). Bilateral knee flexor muscle PT measurements were performed. The relative PT at 180°/s (RPT), PT angle at 180°/s, and range of motion at 180°/s were analysed. The RPT limb symmetry index (LSI) was calculated. Tests for dependent samples, one-way analysis of variance, post hoc test, and linear Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) calculations were performed.

Results

The shift towards extension was noted when comparing the ACL-reconstructed limb to the uninvolved limb (Group I, p ≤ 0.001; Group II, p ≤ 0.001) and to Group III (p ≤ 0.001), but it was not correlated with physiotherapy supervision duration (r = -0.037, p = 0.662). In ACL-reconstructed patients, there was a moderate association of supervision duration and knee flexor LSI (r = 0.587, p < 0.001).

Conclusions

The ACL-reconstructed knee flexors PT angle shift towards extension was observed regardless of the duration of postoperative physiotherapy supervision. However, the analysis revealed that the duration of supervised physiotherapy positively influenced the RPT and LSI in patients after the ACLR.

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<![CDATA[Multi-sensor movement analysis for transport safety and health applications]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5ca2c0d5eed0c48441ea09

Recent increases in the use of and applications for wearable technology has opened up many new avenues of research. In this paper, we consider the use of lifelogging and GPS data to extend fine-grained movement analysis for improving applications in health and safety. We first design a framework to solve the problem of indoor and outdoor movement detection from sensor readings associated with images captured by a lifelogging wearable device. Second we propose a set of measures related with hazard on the road network derived from the combination of GPS movement data, road network data and the sensor readings from a wearable device. Third, we identify the relationship between different socio-demographic groups and the patterns of indoor physical activity and sedentary behaviour routines as well as disturbance levels on different road settings.

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<![CDATA[A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5ca2a2d5eed0c48441e7c0

Whilst the movement demands of players completing a whole soccer match have been well-documented, comparable information relating to substitutes is sparse. Therefore, this study profiled the match-day physical activities performed by soccer substitutes, focusing separately on the pre and post pitch-entry periods. Seventeen English Championship soccer players were monitored using 10 Hz Micromechanical Electrical Systems (MEMS) devices during 13 matches in which they participated as substitutes (35 observations). Twenty physical variables were examined and data were organised by bouts of warm-up activity (pre pitch-entry), and five min epochs of match-play (post pitch-entry). Linear mixed modelling assessed the influence of time (i.e., ‘bout’ and ‘epoch’), playing position, and match scoreline. Substitutes performed 3±1 rewarm-up bouts∙player-1∙match-1. Compared to the initial warm-up, each rewarm-up was shorter (-19.7 to -22.9 min) and elicited less distance (-606 to -741 m), whilst relative total distances were higher (+26 to +69 m∙min-1). Relative total (+13.4 m∙min-1) and high-speed (+0.4 m∙min-1) distances covered during rewarm-ups increased (p <0.001) with proximity to pitch-entry. Players covered more (+3.2 m; p = 0.047) high-speed distance per rewarm-up when the assessed team was losing compared with when winning at the time of pitch-entry. For 10 out of 20 variables measured after pitch-entry, values reduced from 0–5 min thereafter, and substitutes covered greater (p ˂0.05) total (+67 to +93 m) and high-speed (+14 to +33 m) distances during the first five min of match-play versus all subsequent epochs. Midfielders covered more distance (+41 m) per five min epoch than both attackers (p ˂0.001) and defenders (p = 0.016). Acknowledging the limitations of a solely movement data approach and the potential influence of other match-specific factors, such findings provide novel insights into the match-day demands faced by substitute soccer players. Future research opportunities exist to better understand the match-day practices of this population.

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<![CDATA[Measurement of time-varying kinematics of a dolphin in burst accelerating swimming]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b5280d5eed0c4842bca0f

Dolphins are well known as excellent swimmers for being capable of efficient cruising and sharp acceleration. While studies of the thrust production and power consumption of dolphin swimming have been the main subject for decades, time-varying acceleration process during successive fluke beats still remains poorly understood. In this study, we quantified the time-varying kinematics of a dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) by directly recording its burst-accelerating swimming before vertical jump in an aquarium with two synchronized high-speed video cameras. We tracked the three-dimensional trajectories of its beak, body sides, and fluke. We found that dolphin could quickly accelerate from 5.0 m s-1 to 8.7 m s-1 merely by 5 strokes (i.e. 2.5 fluke beats) in 0.7 seconds. During the strokes, it was further found that the dolphin demonstrated a great acceleration in downstroke but less acceleration or even a slight deceleration in upstroke. Hydrodynamic forces and thrust power for each stroke were further estimated based on the equation of body motion and a static hydrodynamic model. The drag coefficient of the dolphin was estimated through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the steady flows around a realistic geometric model based on 3-D scan data. The thrust and thrust power were then calculated by combining the body kinematics and the drag coefficient, resulting in a maximum stroke-averaged thrust and power-to-mass ratio of 1.3 × 103 N and 90 W kg-1 at downstroke, and 3.3 × 102 N and 19 W kg-1 at upstroke, respectively. Our results point out the importance of asymmetric kinematics in burst acceleration of dolphin, which may be a useful mechanism for biomimetic design of high-performance underwater robots.

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<![CDATA[Further empirical data for torsion on bowed strings]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c61e932d5eed0c48496f96e

Research on bowed string motion focuses on transverse waves rather than on torsional waves. These are believed to play only a minor role for stabilizing vibrations and no role for perception. Here, torsion is measured on both sides of the bow contact point for a variety of bridge-bow distances on a cello string. Every periodic string release is preceeded by a reverse torsional motion independent from bowing position or dynamics. Transverse and torsional motions are coupled and there are cases of stabilization, but also cases of perturbation or surrender. Structural and timing analyses of torsional waves suggest that the earlier concepts of differential slipping can be essentially confirmed while the concept of Schelleng ripples cannot be confirmed and the concept of subharmonics is under question.

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