ResearchPad - muscle-analysis https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Relationship between maximal incremental and high-intensity interval exercise performance in elite athletes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13822 This descriptive study aimed to explore the physiological factors that determine tolerance to exertion during high-intensity interval effort. Forty-seven young women (15–28 years old) were enrolled: 23 athletes from Taiwan national or national reserve teams and 24 moderately active females. Each participant underwent a maximal incremental INC (modified Bruce protocol) cardiopulmonary exercise test on the first day and high-intensity interval testing (HIIT) on the second day, both performed on a treadmill. The HIIT protocol involved alternation between 1-min effort at 120% of the maximal speed, at the same slope reached at the end of the INC, and 1-min rest until volitional exhaustion. Gas exchange, heart rate (HR), and muscle oxygenation at the right vastus lateralis, measured by near-infrared spectroscopy, were continuously recorded. The number of repetitions completed (Rlim) by each participant was considered the HIIT tolerance index. The results showed a large difference in the Rlim (range, 2.6–12.0 repetitions) among the participants. Stepwise linear regression revealed that the variance in the Rlim within the cohort was related to the recovery rates of oxygen consumption (V˙O2), HR at the second minute after INC, and muscle tissue saturation index at exhaustion (R = 0.644). In addition, age was linearly correlated with Rlim (adjusted R = −0.518, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the recovery rates for V˙O2 and HR after the incremental test, and muscle saturation index at exhaustion, were the major physiological factors related to HIIT performance. These findings provide insights into the role of the recovery phase after maximal INC exercise testing. Future research investigating a combination of INC and HIIT testing to determine training-induced performance improvement is warranted.

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<![CDATA[Low relative muscle volume: Correlation with prevalence of venous thromboembolism following total knee arthroplasty]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8823ced5eed0c484639081

Background

There have been many efforts to find modifiable risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the perioperative period of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), while no study has investigated the relationship between the muscle mass and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism frequency following TKA. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between muscle volume and the prevalence of symptomatic and radiologically confirmed venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Methods

A total of 261 consecutive patients who underwent primary TKA between 2013 and 2015 were enrolled. Computed tomographic venography with pulmonary angiography (CTVPA) was performed between the 5th and 7th postoperative days to assess the presence of VTE. Four parameters of muscle volume at three levels were evaluated on CTVPA: (i) the cross-sectional area of all skeletal muscles (skeletal muscle index) and total psoas area at the level of the third lumbar vertebrae; (ii) the vastus lateralis muscle at the thigh level; and (iii) the posterior crural muscle at the lower leg level. The relationship between the muscle volume at each level and the prevalence of VTE after TKA was evaluated with multivariate adjusted logistic regression models.

Results

The CTVPA scan showed no proximal DVT, and all thrombi were located in muscular, peroneal, and posterior tibial veins. In unilateral TKA, patients with lower muscle volume of the vastus lateralis at the thigh level in the nonoperated limb had significantly higher prevalence of distal DVT in the operated limb (adjusted OR: 2.97 at subclinical DVT revealed by CTVPA and adjusted OR: 2.68 at symptomatic DVT). This finding was also discovered in patients who underwent simultaneous bilateral TKA (adjusted OR: 1.73–2.97 at subclinical DVT and adjusted OR:1.76–1.86 at symptomatic DVT).

Conclusions

The relative muscle volume of the vastus lateralis at the thigh level was negatively associated with the prevalence of symptomatic and radiologically confirmed DVT, suggesting that low thigh muscle mass is an independent risk factor for VTE in the postoperative period of TKA.

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<![CDATA[Is there an accurate relationship between simple self-reported functional limitations and the assessment of physical capacity in early old age?]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8c194dd5eed0c484b4d398

Study design

Observational study.

Objective

To assess the relationship between individual self-reports and measurements of physical condition in early old age.

Background

The use of self-reported questions assessing physical limitations remains questionable in large epidemiological studies. We aimed to test whether there is an accurate relationship between objective measures of physical capabilities and answers given to questions asked of general early old age populations.

Methods

20,335 subjects (45 to 69 years old) performed two gait speed tests at usual and at rapid speeds, and a hand grip strength test. They also completed an interview which included questions about general and specific limitations on their ability to walk one kilometer, climb stairs, and carry 5 kg over a distance of 10 meters. The questions were coded by the patients on a 4-point scale according to the severity of the limitation. Analyses were performed using description of distributions and related tests were carried out.

Results

A fair association was found between individual self-reports and measurements of physical state: limitations on walking one kilometer and climbing stairs were more closely related to rapid than to usual gait speed and to carrying a 5 kg load. For general limitations, the strength of these associations was weaker than the other scores. The association between hand grip strength and the reported score for carrying a mass was better than that for gait speed tests.

Conclusion

Such simple self-assessment questions on physical performance might be useful tools for evaluating functional limitations across a large early old age population in epidemiological research.

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<![CDATA[Minimal force transmission between human thumb and index finger muscles under passive conditions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c706784d5eed0c4847c7163

It has been hypothesized that force can be transmitted between adjacent muscles. Intermuscle force transmission violates the assumption that muscles act in mechanical isolation, and implies that predictions from biomechanical models are in error due to mechanical interactions between muscles, but the functional relevance of intermuscle force transmission is unclear. To investigate intermuscle force transmission between human flexor pollicis longus and the index finger part of flexor digitorum profundus, we compared finger flexion force produced by passive thumb flexion after one of three conditioning protocols: passive thumb flexion-extension cycling, thumb flexion maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and thumb extension stretch. Finger flexion force increased after all three conditions. Compared to passive thumb flexion-extension cycling, change in finger flexion force was less after thumb extension stretch (mean difference 0.028 N, 95% CI 0.005 to 0.051 N), but not after thumb flexion MVC (0.007 N, 95% CI -0.020 to 0.033 N). As muscle conditioning changed finger flexion force produced by passive thumb flexion, the change in force is likely due to intermuscle force transmission. Thus, intermuscle force transmission resulting from passive stretch of an adjacent muscle is probably small enough to be ignored.

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<![CDATA[Peak torque angle of anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed knee flexor muscles in patients with semitendinosus and gracilis autograft is shifted towards extension regardless of the postoperative duration of supervised physiotherapy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c633944d5eed0c484ae6385

Background

The observational cohort study investigated whether the flexor muscles peak torque (PT) angle shifting towards extension observed in the involved knee in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) using semitendinosus and gracilis tendon (STGR) autograft is associated with the postoperative physiotherapy supervision duration.

Methods

From 230 ACL-reconstructed males, we identified patients after ACLR utilizing STGR autograft and divided them into those who completed supervised physiotherapy <6 months (Group I; n = 77) and those who completed supervised physiotherapy ≥6 months (Group II; n = 66). The mean follow-up time was 6.84 ± 1.47 months. The ACL-reconstructed patients were compared to 98 controls (Group III). Bilateral knee flexor muscle PT measurements were performed. The relative PT at 180°/s (RPT), PT angle at 180°/s, and range of motion at 180°/s were analysed. The RPT limb symmetry index (LSI) was calculated. Tests for dependent samples, one-way analysis of variance, post hoc test, and linear Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) calculations were performed.

Results

The shift towards extension was noted when comparing the ACL-reconstructed limb to the uninvolved limb (Group I, p ≤ 0.001; Group II, p ≤ 0.001) and to Group III (p ≤ 0.001), but it was not correlated with physiotherapy supervision duration (r = -0.037, p = 0.662). In ACL-reconstructed patients, there was a moderate association of supervision duration and knee flexor LSI (r = 0.587, p < 0.001).

Conclusions

The ACL-reconstructed knee flexors PT angle shift towards extension was observed regardless of the duration of postoperative physiotherapy supervision. However, the analysis revealed that the duration of supervised physiotherapy positively influenced the RPT and LSI in patients after the ACLR.

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<![CDATA[Lifestyle factors and visceral adipose tissue: Results from the PREDIMED-PLUS study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e6ead5eed0c484ef4342

Background

Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is a strong predictor of cardiometabolic health, and lifestyle factors may have a positive influence on VAT depot. This study aimed to assess the cross-sectional associations between baseline levels of physical activity (PA), sedentary behaviours (SB) and adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with VAT depot in older individuals with overweight/obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Methods

Baseline data of the PREDIMED-Plus study including a sample of 1,231 Caucasian men and women aged 55–75 years were used. Levels of leisure-time PA (total, light, and moderate-to-vigorous, in METs·min/day) and SB (total and TV-viewing, in h/day) were evaluated using validated questionnaires. Adherence to the MedDiet was evaluated using a 17-item energy-restricted MedDiet (erMedDiet) screener. The chair-stand test was used to estimate the muscle strength. VAT depot was assessed with DXA-CoreScan. Multivariable adjusted linear regression models were used to evaluate the association between lifestyle factors and VAT. For the statistics we had used multiadjusted linear regression models.

Results

Total leisure-time PA (100 METs·min/day: β -24.3g, -36.7;-11.9g), moderate-to-vigorous PA (β -27.8g, 95% CI -40.8;-14.8g), chair-stand test (repeat: β -11.5g, 95% CI -20.1;-2.93g) were inversely associated, and total SB (h/day: β 38.2g, 95% CI 14.7;61.7) positively associated with VAT. Light PA, TV-viewing time and adherence to an erMedDiet were not significantly associated with VAT.

Conclusions

In older adults with overweigh/obesity and metabolic syndrome, greater PA, muscle strength, and lower total SB were associated with less VAT depot. In this study, adherence to an erMedDiet was not associated with lower VAT.

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<![CDATA[Nandrolone decanoate administration does not attenuate muscle atrophy during a short period of disuse]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c58d610d5eed0c484031507

Background

A few days of bed rest or immobilization following injury, disease, or surgery can lead to considerable loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. It has been speculated that such short, successive periods of muscle disuse may be largely responsible for the age-related loss of muscle mass throughout the lifespan.

Objective

To assess whether a single intramuscular injection of nandrolone decanoate prior to immobilization can attenuate the loss of muscle mass and strength in vivo in humans.

Design, setting and participants

Thirty healthy (22 ± 1 years) men were subjected to 7 days of one-legged knee immobilization by means of a full leg cast with (NAD, n = 15) or without (CON, n = 15) prior intramuscular nandrolone decanoate injection (200 mg).

Measures

Before and immediately after immobilization, quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) (by means of single-slice computed tomography (CT) scans of the upper leg) and one-legged knee extension strength (one-repetition maximum [1-RM]) were assessed for both legs. Furthermore, muscle biopsies from the immobilized leg were taken before and after immobilization to assess type I and type II muscle fiber cross-sectional area.

Results

Quadriceps muscle CSA decreased during immobilization in both CON and NAD (-6 ± 1% and -6 ± 1%, respectively; main effect of time P<0.01), with no differences between the groups (time × treatment interaction, P = 0.59). Leg muscle strength declined following immobilization (-6 ± 2% in CON and -7 ± 3% in NAD; main effect of time, P<0.05), with no differences between groups (time × treatment interaction, P = 0.55).

Conclusions

This is the first study to report that nandrolone decanoate administration does not preserve skeletal muscle mass and strength during a short period of leg immobilization in vivo in humans.

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<![CDATA[Leg muscle strength is reduced and is associated with physical quality of life in Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c61e902d5eed0c48496f649

Objective

Physical quality of life is reduced in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). This study aims to investigate whether this may be explained by reduced muscle strength and physical activity resulting from disease damage and steroid myopathy.

Methods

Forty-eight AAV patients were sequentially included from the outpatient clinic. Patients in different stages of disease and treatment underwent measurements of muscle strength and anthropometric parameters. Patients filled in physical activity (Baecke) and quality of life questionnaires (RAND-36) and carried an accelerometer for a week. Muscle strength and physical activity were compared to quality of life, prednisolone use and disease duration.

Results

Most AAV patients had lower knee extension (76%) and elbow flexion (67%) forces than expected based on healthy norms. Also, physical (P<0.001) and mental (P = 0.01) quality of life were significantly reduced compared to healthy norm values. Lower knee extension force (P = 0.009), younger age <70 (P<0.001) and relapse of vasculitis (P = 0.003) were associated with lower age-adjusted physical quality of life. Lower Baecke index (P = 0.006), higher prednisolone dose (P = 0.005) and ENT involvement (P = 0.006) were associated with lower age-adjusted mental quality of life. Leg muscle strength showed no association with current or cumulative prednisolone use. Disease duration was longer in patients with knee extension force below healthy norms (P = 0.006).

Conclusion

Knee extension force and physical activity are positively associated with quality of life in AAV. Knee extension force decreases with longer disease duration, suggesting that disease- and treatment-related damage have a cumulative negative effect on muscle strength.

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<![CDATA[Antagonist muscle activity during reactive balance responses is elevated in Parkinson’s disease and in balance impairment]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e6c8d5eed0c484ef3d8a

Background

Abnormal antagonist leg muscle activity could indicate increased muscle co-contraction and clarify mechanisms of balance impairments in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Prior studies in carefully selected patients showed PD patients demonstrate earlier, longer, and larger antagonist muscle activation during reactive balance responses to perturbations.

Research question

Here, we tested whether antagonist leg muscle activity was abnormal in a group of PD patients who were not selected for phenotype and most of whom had volunteered for exercise-based rehabilitation.

Methods

We compared antagonist activation during reactive balance responses to multidirectional support-surface translation perturbations in 31 patients with mild-moderate PD (age 68±9; H&Y 1–3; UPDRS-III 32±10) and 13 matched individuals (age 65±9). We quantified modulation of muscle activity (i.e., the ability to activate and inhibit muscles appropriately according to the perturbation direction) using modulation indices (MI) derived from minimum and maximum EMG activation levels observed across perturbation directions.

Results

Antagonist leg muscle activity was abnormal in unselected PD patients compared to controls. Linear mixed models identified significant associations between impaired modulation and PD (P<0.05) and PD severity (P<0.01); models assessing the entire sample without referencing PD status identified associations with balance ability (P<0.05), but not age (P = 0.10).

Significance

Antagonist activity is increased during reactive balance responses in PD patients who are not selected on phenotype and are candidates for exercise-based rehabilitation. This activity may be a mechanism of balance impairment in PD and a potential rehabilitation target or outcome measure.

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<![CDATA[Associations between cervical disc degeneration and muscle strength in a cross-sectional population-based study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e6dbd5eed0c484ef3f9e

The physical and biochemical factors related to cervical disc degeneration (CDD), which is involved in several spinal disorders, remain uncertain. We investigated associations between CDD and muscle strength in a general Japanese population. We used mid-sagittal-plane MRIs to assess CDD in 344 subjects recruited from participants in our community health-check project, and measured body mass index (BMI), skeletal muscle index (SMI), and muscle strength in the neck, trunk, hands, and legs. CDD was scored based on the prevalence and severity of intravertebral disc degeneration. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to evaluate whether the SMI or muscle-strength values were correlated with the disc degenerative score. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were then conducted with the CDD score as the dependent variable, and age, sex, BMI, and muscle strength as independent variables, for each gender. These analyses used the muscle-strength parameters that were found to be correlated with the CDD scores in the single correlation analyses. The CDD scores were similar in men and women. Men had significantly more muscle strength in the neck, trunk, hands, and legs. There was a significant negative corelation between the CDD score and the trunk strength in both sexes, handgrip in men, and leg strength in women in the single-variable correlation analysis. Including age and the limb- or trunk-muscle strength comprehensively, multiple linear regression analyses showed that age was the strongest factor that was independently associated with CDD in both sexes, and that the effects were attenuated by limb and trunk muscle strength.

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<![CDATA[Dynamic stretching alone can impair slower velocity isokinetic performance of young male handball players for at least 24 hours]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e66ed5eed0c484ef3164

There are many adult studies reporting static stretch (SS)-induced deficits and dynamic stretch (DS) performance improvements shortly after the intervention. However, there is only a single study examining stretch-induced performance changes with youth at 24 hours’ post-stretch. The objective of this study was to examine physiological responses of young trained athletes at 24-hours after experiencing SS or DS protocols. Eight young male, elite handball players (age: 16.1±5.1 years) were tested prior to-, 3-minutes and 24-hours following the three conditions (DS, SS, Control) in a randomized and counterbalanced order. Similar volumes of SS (2 repetitions of 75s for each leg) and DS (5 repetitions of 30s for each leg) involved one stretch each for the quadriceps and hamstrings. Tests included (i) two 4s maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) at 60° of knee flexion with 2-min rest, (ii) two maximal isokinetic contractions each at 60°/sec and 300°/sec with 1-min rest, and (iii) two drop jumps with 30-sec rest. To simulate a full warm-up, dynamic activity including 5 minutes of aerobic cycling (70 rpm; 1 kilopond), 4 submaximal isometric contractions and 4 drop jumps were instituted before the pre-tests and following the interventions. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs revealed that 1) both the SS and control conditions exhibited knee extensor 60°.s-1 (SS:-10.3%; p = 0.04, Control: -8.7%; p = 0.07) and 300°.s-1 (SS: -12.9%; p = 0.005, Control: -16.3%; p = 0.02) isokinetic deficits at post-test, 2) DS impaired knee flexor 60°.s-1 isokinetic work and power-related measures at post-test (Work: -10.1%; p = 0.0006; Power: -19.1%; p = 0.08) and at 24-hours’ post-test (Work: 9.9%; p = 0.023; Power: -9.6%; p = 0.01), 3) DS (12.07% and 10.47%) and SS (13.7% and 14.6%) enhanced knee flexor 300°.s-1 isokinetic force and power-related measures compared to control. In conclusion, testing-induced knee extensor isokinetic impairments were counterbalanced by DS, however the hip flexion DS could have produced minor muscle damage for at least 24-hours decreasing knee flexor forces and power at 60°.s-1.

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<![CDATA[Eccentric cycling does not improve cycling performance in amateur cyclists]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c3667acd5eed0c4841a5fd5

Eccentric cycling training induces muscle hypertrophy and increases joint power output in non-athletes. Moreover, eccentric cycling can be considered a movement-specific type of strength training for cyclists, but it is hitherto unknown if eccentric cycling training can improve cycling performance in trained cyclists. Twenty-three male amateur cyclists were randomized to an eccentric or a concentric cycling training group. The eccentric cycling was performed at a low cadence (~40 revolution per minute) and the intensity was controlled by perceived effort (12–17 on the Borgs scale) during 2 min intervals (repeated 5–8 times). The cadence and perceived effort of the concentric group matched those of the eccentric group. Additionally, after the eccentric or concentric cycling, both groups performed traditionally aerobic intervals with freely chosen cadence in the same session (4–5 x 4–15 min). The participants trained twice a week for 10 weeks. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), maximal aerobic power output (Wmax), lactate threshold, isokinetic strength, muscle thickness, pedaling characteristics and cycling performance (6- and 30-sec sprints and a 20-min time trial test) were assessed before and after the intervention period. Inferences about the true value of the effects were evaluated using probabilistic magnitude-based inferences. Eccentric cycling induced muscle hypertrophy (2.3 ± 2.5% more than concentric) and augmented eccentric strength (8.8 ± 5.9% more than concentric), but these small magnitude effects seemed not to transfer into improvements in the physiological assessments or cycling performance. On the contrary, the eccentric training appeared to have limiting or detrimental effects on cycling performance, measured as Wmax and a 20-min time trial. In conclusion, eccentric cycling training did not improve cycling performance in amateur cyclists. Further research is required to ascertain whether the present findings reflect an actual lack of efficacy, negative effects or a delayed response to eccentric cycling training.

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<![CDATA[The ACE I/D polymorphism does not explain heterogeneity of natural course and response to enzyme replacement therapy in Pompe disease]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c141e82d5eed0c484d26ef8

The majority of children and adults with Pompe disease in the population of European descent carry the leaky splicing GAA variant c.-32-13T>G (IVS1) in combination with a fully deleterious GAA variant on the second allele. The phenotypic spectrum of this patient group is exceptionally broad, with symptom onset ranging from early infancy to late adulthood. In addition, the response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) varies between patients. The insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) has been suggested to be a modifier of disease onset and/or response to ERT. Here, we have investigated the effect of the ACE I/D polymorphism in a relatively large cohort of 131 children and adults with Pompe disease, of whom 112 were followed during treatment with ERT for 5 years. We assessed the use of wheelchair and mechanical ventilation, muscle strength assessed via manual muscle testing and hand-held dynamometry (HHD), distance walked on the six-minute walk test (6MWT), forced vital capacity (FVC) in sitting and supine position and daily-life activities assessed by R-PAct. Cross sectional analysis at first visit showed no differences between the genotypes with respect to age at first symptoms, diagnosis, wheelchair use, or ventilator use. Also response to ERT over 5 years assessed by linear mixed model analyses showed no significant differences between ACE groups for any of the outcome measures. The patient cohort contained 24 families with 54 siblings. Differences in ACE genotype could neither explain inter nor intra familial differences. We conclude that the ACE I/D polymorphism does not explain the large variation in disease severity and response to ERT observed among Pompe patients with the same c.-32-13T>G GAA variant.

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<![CDATA[A spasticity model based on feedback from muscle force explains muscle activity during passive stretches and gait in children with cerebral palsy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c141ebed5eed0c484d2806b

Muscle spasticity is characterized by exaggerated stretch reflexes and affects about 85% of the children with cerebral palsy. However, the mechanisms underlying spasticity and its influence on gait are not well understood. Here, we first aimed to model the response of spastic hamstrings and gastrocnemii in children with cerebral palsy to fast passive stretches. Then, we evaluated how the model applied to gait. We developed three models based on exaggerated proprioceptive feedback. The first model relied on feedback from muscle fiber length and velocity (velocity-related model), the second model relied on feedback from muscle fiber length, velocity, and acceleration (acceleration-related model), and the third model relied on feedback from muscle force and its first time derivative (force-related model). The force-related model better reproduced measured hamstrings and gastrocnemii activity during fast passive stretches (coefficients of determination (R2): 0.73 ± 0.10 and 0.60 ± 0.13, respectively, and root mean square errors (RMSE): 0.034 ± 0.031 and 0.009 ± 0.007, respectively) than the velocity-related model (R2: 0.46 ± 0.15 and 0.07 ± 0.13, and RMSE: 0.053 ± 0.051 and 0.015 ± 0.009), and the acceleration-related model (R2: 0.47 ± 0.15 and 0.09 ± 0.14, and RMSE: 0.052 ± 0.050 and 0.015 ± 0.008). Additionally, the force-related model predicted hamstrings and gastrocnemii activity that better correlated with measured activity during gait (cross correlations: 0.82 ± 0.09 and 0.85 ± 0.06, respectively) than the activity predicted by the velocity-related model (cross correlations: 0.49 ± 0.17 and 0.71 ± 0.22) and the acceleration-related model (cross correlations: 0.51 ± 0.16 and 0.67 ± 0.20). Our results therefore suggest that force encoding in muscle spindles in combination with altered feedback gains and thresholds underlie activity of spastic muscles during passive stretches and gait. Our model of spasticity opens new perspectives for studying movement impairments due to spasticity through simulation.

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<![CDATA[Reproducibility of isokinetic strength assessment of knee muscle actions in adult athletes: Torques and antagonist-agonist ratios derived at the same angle position]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b8acdf940307c144d0de05f

The current study aimed to examine the reliability of the conventional and functional ratios derived from peak torques (PTs) and those obtained from the combination of knee flexors torque at the angle of knee extensors PT. Twenty-six male athletes (mean of 24.0±0.7 years) from different sports completed a test-to-test variation in isokinetic strength (Biodex, System 3) within a period of one week. Anthropometry and body composition assessed by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry were also measured. The proposed isokinetic strength ratio measurements appeared to be highly reliable: conventional ratio at PT angle (intra-class correlation, ICC = 0.98; 95% confidence interval; 95%CI: 0.95 to 0.99); functional extension ratio at PT angle (ICC = 0.98; 95%CI: 0.96 to 0.99); and, functional flexion ratio at PT angle (ICC = 0.95; 95%CI: 0.89 to 0.98). Technical error of measurement (TEM) and associated percentage of the coefficient of variation (%CV) were as follows: conventional ratio at PT angle (TEM = 0.02; %CV = 4.1); functional extension ratio at PT angle (TEM = 0.02; %CV = 3.8); and, functional flexion ratio at PT angle (TEM = 0.03; %CV = 3.6). The current study demonstrated that the traditional and new obtained simple and combined isokinetic indicators seem highly reliable to assess muscle strength and function in adult male athletes. A single testing session seems to be sufficiently to obtain these isokinetic strength indicators.

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<![CDATA[Changes in Achilles tendon stiffness and energy cost following a prolonged run in trained distance runners]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b87836b40307c3c4509766e

During prolonged running, the magnitude of Achilles tendon (AT) length change may increase, resulting in increased tendon strain energy return with each step. AT elongation might also affect the magnitude of triceps surae (TS) muscle shortening and shortening velocity, requiring greater activation and increased muscle energy cost. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the tendon strain energy return and muscle energy cost necessary to allow energy storage to occur prior to and following prolonged running. 14 trained male (n = 10) and female (n = 4) distance runners (24±4 years, 1.72±0.09 m, 61±10 kg, V˙O2max 64.6±5.8 ml•kg-1•min-1) ran 90 minutes (RUN) at approximately 85% of lactate threshold speed (sLT). Prior to and following RUN, AT stiffness and running energy cost (Erun) at 85% sLT were determined. AT energy return was calculated from AT stiffness, measured with dynamometry and ultrasound and estimated TS force during stance. TS energy cost was estimated on the basis of AT force and assumed crossbridge mechanics and energetics. Following RUN, AT stiffness was reduced from 328±172 N•mm-1 to 299±148 N•mm-1 (p = 0.022). Erun increased from 4.56±0.32 J•kg-1•m-1 to 4.62±0.32 J•kg-1•m-1 (p = 0.049). Estimated AT energy return was not different following RUN (p = 0.99). Estimated TS muscle energy cost increased significantly by 11.8±12.3 J•stride-1, (p = 0.0034), accounting for much of the post-RUN increase in Erun (8.6±14.5 J•stride-1,r2 = 0.31). These results demonstrate that a prolonged, submaximal run can reduce AT stiffness and increase Erun in trained runners, and that the elevated TS energy cost contributes substantially to the elevated Erun.

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<![CDATA[Surgical outcomes of unilateral recession and resection in intermittent exotropia according to forced duction test results]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b694666463d7e3867f4ad0a

Purpose

To compare the surgical outcomes of unilateral lateral rectus recession–medial rectus resection (RR) according to forced duction test (FDT) results with those of conventional RR in intermittent exotropia.

Methods

A total of 129 patients aged 3 to 10 years with intermittent exotropia who underwent RR between 2006 and 2011 were included. The operator compared the tension of the lateral rectus (LR) between both eyes. When FDT results were asymmetric, RR was performed on the eye with more LR tension. RR was performed on the nondominant eye when FDT results were symmetric. Patients were divided into two groups; one group (n = 64) underwent RR without FDT (RR group) and the other group (n = 65) underwent RR considering FDT results (RR-FDT group). Success, recurrence, reoperation rates and cumulative probabilities of success were evaluated in both groups. Surgical outcome was considered satisfactory if the distance deviation in the primary position was between ≤ 10 PD of exophoria/tropia and ≤ 10 PD of esophoria/tropia. Recurrence was defined as an alignment of > 10 PD of exophoria/tropia, and overcorrection defined as > 10 PD of esophoria/tropia. Reoperation for recurrence was recommended for constant exotropia ≥ 14 PD at distance.

Results

The total follow-up periods were 4.4±2.3 years in the RR group, and 3.9±2.0 years in the RR-FDT group (P = .310). In the RR group, 50 patients (78.1%) were successful, 13 patients (20.3%) had recurrence, and 1 patient (1.6%) had overcorrection at 2 years after surgery. In the RR-FDT group, 58 patients (89.2%) were successful, 5 patients (7.7%) had recurrence, and 2 patients (3.1%) were overcorrected. The recurrence rate at 2 years after operation was significantly lower in the RR-FDT group (P = .045). Recurrence rates during the follow-up period were 5.6% per person-year in the RR group and 2.7% per person-year in the RR-FDT group. Reoperation for recurrence was performed on 7 patients (10.8%) in the RR-FDT group and 16 patients (25.0%) in the RR group (P = .035). Postoperative sensory outcomes were similar between both groups.

Conclusions

The forced duction test was useful in reducing the risk of recurrence at 2 years after surgery when RR was performed on the eye with more passive tension of the LR. Intraoperative FDT may be considered to choose which eye to operate on when planning RR in intermittent exotropia.

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<![CDATA[Synergistic Structure in the Speed Dependent Modulation of Muscle Activity in Human Walking]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dadeab0ee8fa60bbabe3

Recently, a modular organisation has been proposed to simplify control of the large number of muscles involved in human walking. Although previous research indicates that a single set of modular activation patterns can account for muscle activity at different speeds, these studies only provide indirect evidence for the idea that speed regulation in human walking is under modular control. Here, a more direct approach was taken to assess the synergistic structure that underlies speed regulation, by isolating speed effects through the construction of gain functions that represent the linear relation between speed and amplitude for each point in the time-normalized gait cycle. The activity of 13 muscles in 13 participants was measured at 4 speeds (0.69, 1.00, 1.31, and 1.61 ms-1) during treadmill walking. Gain functions were constructed for each of the muscles, and gain functions and the activity patterns at 1.00 ms-1 were both subjected to dimensionality reduction, to obtain modular gain functions and modular basis functions, respectively. The results showed that 4 components captured most of the variance in the gain functions (74.0% ± 1.3%), suggesting that the neuromuscular regulation of speed is under modular control. Correlations between modular gain functions and modular basis functions (range 0.58–0.89) and the associated synergistic muscle weightings (range 0.6–0.95) were generally high, suggesting substantial overlap in the synergistic control of the basic phasing of muscle activity and its modulation through speed. Finally, the combined set of modular functions and associated weightings were well capable of predicting muscle activity patterns obtained at a speed (1.31 ms-1) that was not involved in the initial dimensionality reduction, confirming the robustness of the presently used approach. Taken together, these findings provide direct evidence of synergistic structure in speed regulation, and may inspire further work on flexibility in the modular control of gait.

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<![CDATA[A reproducible semi-automatic method to quantify the muscle-lipid distribution in clinical 3D CT images of the thigh]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db59ab0ee8fa60bdf14d

Many studies use threshold-based techniques to assess in vivo the muscle, bone and adipose tissue distribution of the legs using computed tomography (CT) imaging. More advanced techniques divide the legs into subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), anatomical muscle (muscle tissue and adipocytes within the muscle border) and intra- and perimuscular adipose tissue. In addition, a so-called muscle density directly derived from the CT-values is often measured. We introduce a new integrated approach to quantify the muscle-lipid system (MLS) using quantitative CT in patients with sarcopenia or osteoporosis. The analysis targets the thigh as many CT studies of the hip do not include entire legs The framework consists of an anatomic coordinate system, allowing delineation of reproducible volumes of interest, a robust semi-automatic 3D segmentation of the fascia and a comprehensive method to quantify of the muscle and lipid distribution within the fascia. CT density-dependent features are calibrated using subject-specific internal CT values of the SAT and external CT values of an in scan calibration phantom. Robustness of the framework with respect to operator interaction, image noise and calibration was evaluated. Specifically, the impact of inter- and intra-operator reanalysis precision and addition of Gaussian noise to simulate lower radiation exposure on muscle and AT volumes, muscle density and 3D texture features quantifying MLS within the fascia, were analyzed. Existing data of 25 subjects (age: 75.6 ± 8.7) with porous and low-contrast muscle structures were included in the analysis. Intra- and inter-operator reanalysis precision errors were below 1% and mostly comparable to 1% of cohort variation of the corresponding features. Doubling the noise changed most 3D texture features by up to 15% of the cohort variation but did not affect density and volume measurements. The application of the novel technique is easy with acceptable processing time. It can thus be employed for a comprehensive quantification of the muscle-lipid system enabling radiomics approaches to musculoskeletal disorders.

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<![CDATA[Reliability of a Novel High Intensity One Leg Dynamic Exercise Protocol to Measure Muscle Endurance]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4dab0ee8fa60bdade3

We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion.

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