ResearchPad - myoblasts https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Single-nucleus RNA-seq identifies divergent populations of FSHD2 myotube nuclei]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14649 Although misexpression of DUX4 has been known as the major cause in FSHD, it is lowly expressed in patient samples and analysis of the consequences of DUX4 expression has largely relied on artificial overexpression. Here, we took advantage of recent methodological advances to observe native DUX4 expression at the single-nucleus level in FSHD2 patient-derived myotubes. Using single-nucleus RNA-seq (snRNA-seq), we were able to detect endogenous DUX4-expressing nuclei and the extent of spreading of DUX4-target gene expression across many nuclei. Our highly sensitive snRNA-seq method further allowed us to identify two populations of FSHD myotube nuclei with distinct transcriptional profiles. One is highly enriched with DUX4 and target genes (FSHD-Hi) while the other has sparser DUX4 and FSHD-induced genes expressed (FSHD-Lo), reflecting two potentially different pathological states of patient myotubes. We observed a set of transcription factors specifically upregulated in FSHD-Hi myotube nuclei associated with the cell cycle, and significant upregulation of DUX4 paralog DUXA that contributes to further upregulation of DUX4 target genes. We propose that transcription factors downstream of DUX4 may amplify DUX4 signal and thus act to perpetuate FSHD.

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<![CDATA[Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db44ab0ee8fa60bd801c

Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were recently shown to exit the nucleus via a novel mechanism of nuclear envelope budding. Following DUX4 or DUX4c overexpression in muscle cell cultures, we observed their association with similar nuclear buds. In conclusion, our study demonstrated unexpected interactions of DUX4/4c with cytoplasmic proteins playing major roles during muscle differentiation. Further investigations are on-going to evaluate whether these interactions play roles during muscle regeneration as previously suggested for DUX4c.

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<![CDATA[The Mutual Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Myoblasts in an Autologous Co-Culture Model]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daccab0ee8fa60bb4a79

Both myoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) take part in the muscle tissue regeneration and have been used as experimental cellular therapy in muscular disorders treatment. It is possible that co-transplantation approach could improve the efficacy of this treatment. However, the relations between those two cell types are not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the reciprocal interactions between myoblasts and MSC in vitro in terms of the features important for the muscle regeneration process. Primary caprine muscle-derived cells (MDC) and bone marrow-derived MSC were analysed in autologous settings. We found that MSC contribute to myotubes formation by fusion with MDC when co-cultured directly, but do not acquire myogenic phenotype if exposed to MDC-derived soluble factors only. Experiments with exposure to hydrogen peroxide showed that MSC are significantly more resistant to oxidative stress than MDC, but a direct co-culture with MSC does not diminish the cytotoxic effect of H2O2 on MDC. Cell migration assay demonstrated that MSC possess significantly greater migration ability than MDC which is further enhanced by MDC-derived soluble factors, whereas the opposite effect was not found. MSC-derived soluble factors significantly enhanced the proliferation of MDC, whereas MDC inhibited the division rate of MSC. To conclude, presented results suggest that myogenic precursors and MSC support each other during muscle regeneration and therefore myoblasts-MSC co-transplantation could be an attractive approach in the treatment of muscular disorders.

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<![CDATA[In silico discovery of substituted pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines and pentamidine-like compounds with biological activity in myotonic dystrophy models]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be0332

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a rare multisystemic disorder associated with an expansion of CUG repeats in mutant DMPK (dystrophia myotonica protein kinase) transcripts; the main effect of these expansions is the induction of pre-mRNA splicing defects by sequestering muscleblind-like family proteins (e.g. MBNL1). Disruption of the CUG repeats and the MBNL1 protein complex has been established as the best therapeutic approach for DM1, hence two main strategies have been proposed: targeted degradation of mutant DMPK transcripts and the development of CUG-binding molecules that prevent MBNL1 sequestration. Herein, suitable CUG-binding small molecules were selected using in silico approaches such as scaffold analysis, similarity searching, and druggability analysis. We used polarization assays to confirm the CUG repeat binding in vitro for a number of candidate compounds, and went on to evaluate the biological activity of the two with the strongest affinity for CUG repeats (which we refer to as compounds 12 and 25) in DM1 mutant cells and Drosophila DM1 models with an impaired locomotion phenotype. In particular, 12 and 25 enhanced the levels of free MBNL1 in patient-derived myoblasts in vitro and greatly improved DM1 fly locomotion in climbing assays. This work provides new computational approaches for rational large-scale virtual screens of molecules that selectively recognize CUG structures. Moreover, it contributes valuable knowledge regarding two compounds with desirable biological activity in DM1 models.

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<![CDATA[The Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Is Superior to Tocopherol in Promoting Myogenic Differentiation in the Prevention of Replicative Senescence of Myoblasts]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db3dab0ee8fa60bd57b8

Aging results in a loss of muscle mass and strength. Myoblasts play an important role in maintaining muscle mass through regenerative processes, which are impaired during aging. Vitamin E potentially ameliorates age-related phenotypes. Hence, this study aimed to determine the effects of the tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) and α-tocopherol (ATF) in protecting myoblasts from replicative senescence and promoting myogenic differentiation. Primary human myoblasts were cultured into young and senescent stages and were then treated with TRF or ATF for 24 h, followed by an analysis of cell proliferation, senescence biomarkers, cellular morphology and differentiation. Our data showed that replicative senescence impaired the normal regenerative processes of myoblasts, resulting in changes in cellular morphology, cell proliferation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) expression, myogenic differentiation and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) expression. Treatment with both TRF and ATF was beneficial to senescent myoblasts in reclaiming the morphology of young cells, improved cell viability and decreased SA-β-gal expression. However, only TRF treatment increased BrdU incorporation in senescent myoblasts, as well as promoted myogenic differentiation through the modulation of MRFs at the mRNA and protein levels. MYOD1 and MYOG gene expression and myogenin protein expression were modulated in the early phases of myogenic differentiation. In conclusion, the tocotrienol-rich fraction is superior to α-tocopherol in ameliorating replicative senescence-related aberration and promoting differentiation via modulation of MRFs expression, indicating vitamin E potential in modulating replicative senescence of myoblasts.

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<![CDATA[Pax7 remodels the chromatin landscape in skeletal muscle stem cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db59ab0ee8fa60bdf0df

Pluripotent stem cells (PSC) hold great promise for the treatment of human skeletal muscle diseases. However, it remains challenging to convert PSC to skeletal muscle cells, and the mechanisms by which the master regulatory transcription factor, Pax7, promotes muscle stem (satellite) cell identity are not yet understood. We have taken advantage of PSC-derived skeletal muscle precursor cells (iPax7), wherein the induced expression of Pax7 robustly initiates the muscle program and enables the in vitro generation of precursors that seed the satellite cell compartment upon transplantation. Remarkably, we found that chromatin accessibility in myogenic precursors pre-figures subsequent activation of myogenic differentiation genes. We also found that Pax7 binding is generally restricted to euchromatic regions and excluded from H3K27 tri-methylated regions in muscle cells, suggesting that recruitment of this factor is circumscribed by chromatin state. Further, we show that Pax7 binding induces dramatic, localized remodeling of chromatin characterized by the acquisition of histone marks associated with enhancer activity and induction of chromatin accessibility in both muscle precursors and lineage-committed myoblasts. Conversely, removal of Pax7 leads to rapid reversal of these features on a subset of enhancers. Interestingly, another cluster of Pax7 binding sites is associated with a durably accessible and remodeled chromatin state after removal of Pax7, and persistent enhancer accessibility is associated with subsequent, proximal binding by the muscle regulatory factors, MyoD1 and myogenin. Our studies provide new insights into the epigenetic landscape of skeletal muscle stem cells and precursors and the role of Pax7 in satellite cell specification.

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<![CDATA[Characterization and Functional Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles and Muscle-Abundant miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-206) in C2C12 Myocytes and mdx Mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dadcab0ee8fa60bba122

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder. Here, we show that the CD63 antigen, which is located on the surface of extracellular vesicles (EVs), is associated with increased levels of muscle-abundant miRNAs, namely myomiRs miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-206, in the sera of DMD patients and mdx mice. Furthermore, the release of EVs from the murine myoblast C2C12 cell line was found to be modulated by intracellular ceramide levels in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Next, to investigate the effects of EVs on cell survival, C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes were cultured with EVs from the sera of mdx mice or C2C12 cells overexpressing myomiRs in presence of cellular stresses. Both the exposure of C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes to EVs from the serum of mdx mice, and the overexpression of miR-133a in C2C12 cells in presence of cellular stress resulted in a significant decrease in cell death. Finally, to assess whether miRNAs regulate skeletal muscle regeneration in vivo, we intraperitoneally injected GW4869 (an inhibitor of exosome secretion) into mdx mice for 5 and 10 days. Levels of miRNAs and creatine kinase in the serum of GW4869-treated mdx mice were significantly downregulated compared with those of controls. The tibialis anterior muscles of the GW4869-treated mdx mice showed a robust decrease in Evans blue dye uptake. Collectively, these results indicate that EVs and myomiRs might protect the skeletal muscle of mdx mice from degeneration.

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<![CDATA[DUX4-induced dsRNA and MYC mRNA stabilization activate apoptotic pathways in human cell models of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db54ab0ee8fa60bdcfe2

Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by the mis-expression of DUX4 in skeletal muscle cells. DUX4 is a transcription factor that activates genes normally associated with stem cell biology and its mis-expression in FSHD cells results in apoptosis. To identify genes and pathways necessary for DUX4-mediated apoptosis, we performed an siRNA screen in an RD rhabdomyosarcoma cell line with an inducible DUX4 transgene. Our screen identified components of the MYC-mediated apoptotic pathway and the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) innate immune response pathway as mediators of DUX4-induced apoptosis. Further investigation revealed that DUX4 expression led to increased MYC mRNA, accumulation of nuclear dsRNA foci, and activation of the dsRNA response pathway in both RD cells and human myoblasts. Nuclear dsRNA foci were associated with aggregation of the exon junction complex component EIF4A3. The elevation of MYC mRNA, dsRNA accumulation, and EIF4A3 nuclear aggregates in FSHD muscle cells suggest that these processes might contribute to FSHD pathophysiology.

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<![CDATA[Conessine Interferes with Oxidative Stress-Induced C2C12 Myoblast Cell Death through Inhibition of Autophagic Flux]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da85ab0ee8fa60b9c12b

Conessine, a steroidal alkaloid isolated from Holarrhena floribunda, has anti-malarial activity and interacts with the histamine H3 receptor. However, the cellular effects of conessine are poorly understood. Accordingly, we evaluated the involvement of conessine in the regulation of autophagy. We searched natural compounds that modulate autophagy, and conessine was identified as an inhibitor of autophagic flux. Conessine treatment induced the formation of autophagosomes, and p62, an autophagic adapter, accumulated in the autophagosomes. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) result in muscle cell death by inducing excessive autophagic flux. Treatment with conessine inhibited H2O2-induced autophagic flux in C2C12 myoblast cells and also interfered with cell death. Our results indicate that conessine has the potential effect to inhibit muscle cell death by interfering with autophagic flux.

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<![CDATA[The Impact of Hyperthermia on Receptor-Mediated Interleukin-6 Regulation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f9ab0ee8fa60b71329

In inflammatory cells, hyperthermia inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene expression and protein secretion. Since hyperthermia alone stimulates IL-6 in skeletal muscle, we hypothesized that it would amplify responses to other receptor-mediated stimuli. IL-6 regulation was tested in C2C12 myotubes and in soleus during treatment with epinephrine (EPI) or LPS. In EPI-treated myotubes (100 ng/ml), 1 h exposure at 40.5°C-42°C transiently increased IL-6 mRNA compared to EPI treatment alone at 37°C. In LPS-treated myotubes (1 μg/ml), exposure to 41°C-42°C also increased IL-6 mRNA. In isolated mouse soleus, similar amplifications of IL-6 gene expression were observed in 41°C, during both low (1 ng/ml) and high dose (100 ng/ml) EPI, but only in high dose LPS (1 μg/ml). In myotubes, heat increased IL-6 secretion during EPI exposure but had no effect or inhibited secretion with LPS. In soleus there were no effects of heat on IL-6 secretion during either EPI or LPS treatment. Mechanisms for the effects of heat on IL-6 mRNA were explored using a luciferase-reporter in C2C12 myotubes. Overexpression of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) had no impact on IL-6 promoter activity during EPI stimulation, but elevated IL-6 promoter activity during LPS stimulation. In contrast, when the activator protein-1 (AP-1) element was mutated, responses to both LPS and EPI were suppressed in heat. Using siRNA against activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), a heat-stress-induced inhibitor of IL-6, no ATF-3-dependent effects were observed. The results demonstrate that, unlike inflammatory cells, hyperthermia in muscle fibers amplifies IL-6 gene expression to EPI and LPS. The effect appears to reflect differential engagement of HSF-1 and AP-1 sensitive elements on the IL-6 gene, with no evidence for involvement of ATF-3. The functional significance of increased IL-6 mRNA expression during heat may serve to overcome the well-known suppression of protein synthetic pathways occurring during heat shock.

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<![CDATA[Notch ligands regulate the muscle stem-like state ex vivo but are not sufficient for retaining regenerative capacity]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5aab0ee8fa60bdf796

Myogenic stem cells are a promising avenue for the treatment of muscular disorders. Freshly isolated muscle stem cells have a remarkable engraftment ability in vivo, but their cell number is limited. Current conventional culture conditions do not allow muscle stem cells to expand in vitro with their bona fide engraftment efficiency, requiring the improvement of culture procedures for achieving successful cell-therapy for muscle disorders. Here we expanded mouse muscle stem cells and human myoblasts with Notch ligands, DLL1, DLL4, and JAG1 to activate Notch signaling in vitro and to investigate whether these cells could retain their engraftment efficiency. Notch signaling promotes the expansion of Pax7+MyoD- mouse muscle stem-like cells and inhibits differentiation even after passage in vitro. Treatment with Notch ligands induced the Notch target genes and generated PAX7+MYOD- stem-like cells from human myoblasts previously cultured on conventional culture plates. However, cells treated with Notch ligands exhibit a stem cell-like state in culture, yet their regenerative ability was less than that of freshly isolated cells in vivo and was comparable to that of the control. These unexpected findings suggest that artificial maintenance of Notch signaling alone is insufficient for improving regenerative capacity of mouse and human donor-muscle cells and suggest that combinatorial events are critical to achieve muscle stem cell and myoblast engraftment potential.

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<![CDATA[The CELF1 RNA-Binding Protein Regulates Decay of Signal Recognition Particle mRNAs and Limits Secretion in Mouse Myoblasts]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db53ab0ee8fa60bdca16

We previously identified several mRNAs encoding components of the secretory pathway, including signal recognition particle (SRP) subunit mRNAs, among transcripts associated with the RNA-binding protein CELF1. Through immunoprecipitation of RNAs crosslinked to CELF1 in myoblasts and in vitro binding assays using recombinant CELF1, we now provide evidence that CELF1 directly binds the mRNAs encoding each of the subunits of the SRP. Furthermore, we determined the half-lives of the Srp transcripts in control and CELF1 knockdown myoblasts. Our results indicate CELF1 is a destabilizer of at least five of the six Srp transcripts and that the relative abundance of the SRP proteins is out of balance when CELF1 is depleted. CELF1 knockdown myoblasts exhibit altered secretion of a luciferase reporter protein and are impaired in their ability to migrate and close a wound, consistent with a defect in the secreted extracellular matrix. Importantly, similar defects in wound healing are observed when SRP subunit imbalance is induced by over-expression of SRP68. Our studies support the existence of an RNA regulon containing Srp mRNAs that is controlled by CELF1. One implication is that altered function of CELF1 in myotonic dystrophy may contribute to changes in the extracellular matrix of affected muscle through defects in secretion.

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<![CDATA[Ck2-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Required to Maintain Pax7 Protein Levels in Proliferating Muscle Progenitors]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da9cab0ee8fa60ba440b

Skeletal muscle regeneration and long term maintenance is directly link to the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. In turn, satellite cell fate is influenced by a functional interaction between the transcription factor Pax7 and members of the MyoD family of muscle regulatory factors. Thus, changes in the Pax7-to-MyoD protein ratio may act as a molecular rheostat fine-tuning acquisition of lineage identity while preventing precocious terminal differentiation. Pax7 is expressed in quiescent and proliferating satellite cells, while its levels decrease sharply in differentiating progenitors Pax7 is maintained in cells (re)acquiring quiescence. While the mechanisms regulating Pax7 levels based on differentiation status are not well understood, we have recently described that Pax7 levels are directly regulated by the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4, thus promoting proteasome-dependent Pax7 degradation in differentiating satellite cells. Here we show that Pax7 levels are maintained in proliferating muscle progenitors by a mechanism involving casein kinase 2-dependent Pax7 phosphorylation at S201. Point mutations preventing S201 phosphorylation or casein kinase 2 inhibition result in decreased Pax7 protein in proliferating muscle progenitors. Accordingly, this correlates directly with increased Pax7 ubiquitination. Finally, Pax7 down regulation induced by casein kinase 2 inhibition results in precocious myogenic induction, indicating early commitment to terminal differentiation. These observations highlight the critical role of post translational regulation of Pax7 as a molecular switch controlling muscle progenitor fate.

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<![CDATA[Cellular and Physiological Effects of Dietary Supplementation with β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate (HMB) and β-Alanine in Late Middle-Aged Mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da1eab0ee8fa60b7ddfc

There is growing evidence that severe decline of skeletal muscle mass and function with age may be mitigated by exercise and dietary supplementation with protein and amino acid ingredient technologies. The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of the leucine catabolite, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), in C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes, and to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with HMB, the amino acid β-alanine and the combination thereof, on muscle contractility in a preclinical model of pre-sarcopenia. In C2C12 myotubes, HMB enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release beyond vehicle control in the presence of all SR agonists tested (KCl, P<0.01; caffeine, P = 0.03; ionomycin, P = 0.03). HMB also improved C2C12 myoblast viability (25 μM HMB, P = 0.03) and increased proliferation (25 μM HMB, P = 0.04; 125 μM HMB, P<0.01). Furthermore, an ex vivo muscle contractility study was performed on EDL and soleus muscle from 19 month old, male C57BL/6nTac mice. For 8 weeks, mice were fed control AIN-93M diet, diet with HMB, diet with β-alanine, or diet with HMB and β-alanine. In β-alanine fed mice, EDL muscle showed a 7% increase in maximum absolute force compared to the control diet (202 ± 3vs. 188± 5 mN, P = 0.02). At submaximal frequency of stimulation (20 Hz), EDL from mice fed HMB plus β-alanine showed an 11% increase in absolute force (88.6 ± 2.2 vs. 79.8 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.025) and a 13% increase in specific force (12.2 ± 0.4 vs. 10.8 ± 0.4 N/cm2, P = 0.021). Also in EDL muscle, β-alanine increased the rate of force development at all frequencies tested (P<0.025), while HMB reduced the time to reach peak contractile force (TTP), with a significant effect at 80 Hz (P = 0.0156). In soleus muscle, all experimental diets were associated with a decrease in TTP, compared to control diet. Our findings highlight beneficial effects of HMB and β-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle function in aging mice.

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<![CDATA[Genetic Evidence That Captured Retroviral Envelope syncytins Contribute to Myoblast Fusion and Muscle Sexual Dimorphism in Mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da80ab0ee8fa60b9a652

Syncytins are envelope genes from endogenous retroviruses, “captured” for a role in placentation. They mediate cell-cell fusion, resulting in the formation of a syncytium (the syncytiotrophoblast) at the fetomaternal interface. These genes have been found in all placental mammals in which they have been searched for. Cell-cell fusion is also pivotal for muscle fiber formation and repair, where the myotubes are formed from the fusion of mononucleated myoblasts into large multinucleated structures. Here we show, taking advantage of mice knocked out for syncytins, that these captured genes contribute to myoblast fusion, with a >20% reduction in muscle mass, mean muscle fiber area and number of nuclei per fiber in knocked out mice for one of the two murine syncytin genes. Remarkably, this reduction is only observed in males, which subsequently show muscle quantitative traits more similar to those of females. In addition, we show that syncytins also contribute to muscle repair after cardiotoxin-induced injury, with again a male-specific effect on the rate and extent of regeneration. Finally, ex vivo experiments carried out on murine myoblasts demonstrate the direct involvement of syncytins in fusion, with a >40% reduction in fusion index upon addition of siRNA against both syncytins. Importantly, similar effects are observed with primary myoblasts from sheep, dog and human, with a 20–40% reduction upon addition of siRNA against the corresponding syncytins. Altogether, these results show a direct contribution of the fusogenic syncytins to myogenesis, with a demonstrated male-dependence of the effect in mice, suggesting that these captured genes could be responsible for the muscle sexual dimorphism observed in placental mammals.

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<![CDATA[TEAD transcription factors are required for normal primary myoblast differentiation in vitro and muscle regeneration in vivo]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db53ab0ee8fa60bdcf0b

The TEAD family of transcription factors (TEAD1-4) bind the MCAT element in the regulatory elements of both growth promoting and myogenic differentiation genes. Defining TEAD transcription factor function in myogenesis has proved elusive due to overlapping expression of family members and their functional redundancy. We show that silencing of either Tead1, Tead2 or Tead4 did not effect primary myoblast (PM) differentiation, but that their simultaneous knockdown strongly impaired differentiation. In contrast, Tead1 or Tead4 silencing impaired C2C12 differentiation showing their different contributions in PMs and C2C12 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation identified enhancers associated with myogenic genes bound by combinations of Tead4, Myod1 or Myog. Tead4 regulated distinct gene sets in C2C12 cells and PMs involving both activation of the myogenic program and repression of growth and signaling pathways. ChIP-seq from mature mouse muscle fibres in vivo identified a set of highly transcribed muscle cell-identity genes and sites bound by Tead1 and Tead4. Although inactivation of Tead4 in mature muscle fibres caused no obvious phenotype under normal conditions, notexin-induced muscle regeneration was delayed in Tead4 mutants suggesting an important role in myogenic differentiation in vivo. By combining knockdown in cell models in vitro with Tead4 inactivation in muscle in vivo, we provide the first comprehensive description of the specific and redundant roles of Tead factors in myogenic differentiation.

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<![CDATA[A Novel Lamin A Mutant Responsible for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Causes Distinct Abnormalities of the Cell Nucleus]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4fab0ee8fa60bdbae7

A-type lamins, the intermediate filament proteins participating in nuclear structure and function, are encoded by LMNA. LMNA mutations can lead to laminopathies such as lipodystrophies, premature aging syndromes (progeria) and muscular dystrophies. Here, we identified a novel heterozygous LMNA p.R388P de novo mutation in a patient with a non-previously described severe phenotype comprising congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD) and lipodystrophy. In culture, the patient’s skin fibroblasts entered prematurely into senescence, and some nuclei showed a lamina honeycomb pattern. C2C12 myoblasts were transfected with a construct carrying the patient’s mutation; R388P-lamin A (LA) predominantly accumulated within the nucleoplasm and was depleted at the nuclear periphery, altering the anchorage of the inner nuclear membrane protein emerin and the nucleoplasmic protein LAP2-alpha. The mutant LA triggered a frequent and severe nuclear dysmorphy that occurred independently of prelamin A processing, as well as increased histone H3K9 acetylation. Nuclear dysmorphy was not significantly improved when transfected cells were treated with drugs disrupting microtubules or actin filaments or modifying the global histone acetylation pattern. Therefore, releasing any force exerted at the nuclear envelope by the cytoskeleton or chromatin did not rescue nuclear shape, in contrast to what was previously shown in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria due to other LMNA mutations. Our results point to the specific cytotoxic effect of the R388P-lamin A mutant, which is clinically related to a rare and severe multisystemic laminopathy phenotype.

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<![CDATA[Photobiomodulation Protects and Promotes Differentiation of C2C12 Myoblast Cells Exposed to Snake Venom]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da30ab0ee8fa60b84268

Background

Snakebites is a neglected disease and in Brazil is considered a serious health problem, with the majority of the snakebites caused by the genus Bothrops. Antivenom therapy and other first-aid treatments do not reverse local myonecrose which is the main sequel caused by the envenomation. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of low level laser (LLL) therapy in reducing local myonecrosis induced by Bothropic venoms, however the mechanism involved in this effect is unknown. In this in vitro study, we aimed to analyze the effect of LLL irradiation against cytotoxicity induced by Bothrops jararacussu venom on myoblast C2C12 cells.

Methodology

C2C12 were utilized as a model target and were incubated with B. jararacussu venom (12.5 μg/mL) and immediately irradiated with LLL at wavelength of red 685 nm or infrared 830 nm with energy density of 2.0, 4.6 and 7.0 J/cm2. Effects of LLL on cellular responses of venom-induced cytotoxicity were examined, including cell viability, measurement of cell damage and intra and extracellular ATP levels, expression of myogenic regulatory factors, as well as cellular differentiation.

Results

In non-irradiated cells, the venom caused a decrease in cell viability and a massive release of LDH and CK levels indicating myonecrosis. Infrared and red laser at all energy densities were able to considerably decrease venom-induced cytotoxicity. Laser irradiation induced myoblasts to differentiate into myotubes and this effect was accompanied by up regulation of MyoD and specially myogenin. Moreover, LLL was able to reduce the extracellular while increased the intracellular ATP content after venom exposure. In addition, no difference in the intensity of cytotoxicity was shown by non-irradiated and irradiated venom.

Conclusion

LLL irradiation caused a protective effect on C2C12 cells against the cytotoxicity caused by B. jararacussu venom and promotes differentiation of these cells by up regulation of myogenic factors. A modulatory effect of ATP synthesis may be suggested as a possible mechanism mediating cytoprotection observed under laser irradiation.

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<![CDATA[Trbp Is Required for Differentiation of Myoblasts and Normal Regeneration of Skeletal Muscle]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da57ab0ee8fa60b8f102

Global inactivation of Trbp, a regulator of miRNA pathways, resulted in developmental defects and postnatal lethality in mice. Recently, we showed that cardiac-specific deletion of Trbp caused heart failure. However, its functional role(s) in skeletal muscle has not been characterized. Using a conditional knockout model, we generated mice lacking Trbp in the skeletal muscle. Unexpectedly, skeletal muscle specific Trbp mutant mice appear to be phenotypically normal under normal physiological conditions. However, these mice exhibited impaired muscle regeneration and increased fibrosis in response to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury, suggesting that Trbp is required for muscle repair. Using cultured myoblast cells we further showed that inhibition of Trbp repressed myoblast differentiation in vitro. The impaired myogenesis is associated with reduced expression of muscle-specific miRNAs, miR-1a and miR-133a. Together, our study demonstrated that Trbp participates in the regulation of muscle differentiation and regeneration.

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<![CDATA[Delta/Notch-Like EGF-Related Receptor (DNER) Is Not a Notch Ligand]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daa5ab0ee8fa60ba74ff

Delta/Notch-like EGF-related receptor (DNER) has been reported to act as a Notch ligand, despite lacking a Delta/Serrate/Lag (DSL) binding domain common to all other known ligands. The established Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (DLL1), but not DNER, activated Notch1 in a luciferase assay, prevented the differentiation of myoblasts through Notch signaling, and bound Notch-fc in a cell-based assay. DNER is not a Notch ligand and its true function remains unknown.

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