ResearchPad - myotonic-dystrophy https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Differences in splicing defects between the grey and white matter in myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14627 Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multi-system disorder caused by CTG repeats in the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) gene. This leads to the sequestration of splicing factors such as muscleblind-like 1/2 (MBNL1/2) and aberrant splicing in the central nervous system. We investigated the splicing patterns of MBNL1/2 and genes controlled by MBNL2 in several regions of the brain and between the grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) in DM1 patients using RT-PCR. Compared with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, as disease controls), the percentage of spliced-in parameter (PSI) for most of the examined exons were significantly altered in most of the brain regions of DM1 patients, except for the cerebellum. The splicing of many genes was differently regulated between the GM and WM in both DM1 and ALS. In 7 out of the 15 examined splicing events, the level of PSI change between DM1 and ALS was significantly higher in the GM than in the WM. The differences in alternative splicing between the GM and WM may be related to the effect of DM1 on the WM of the brain.

]]>
<![CDATA[Tracking the brain in myotonic dystrophies: A 5-year longitudinal follow-up study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8accf4d5eed0c4849903d9

Objectives

The aim of this study was to examine the natural history of brain involvement in adult-onset myotonic dystrophies type 1 and 2 (DM1, DM2).

Methods

We conducted a longitudinal observational study to examine functional and structural cerebral changes in myotonic dystrophies. We enrolled 16 adult-onset DM1 patients, 16 DM2 patients, and 17 controls. At baseline and after 5.5 ± 0.4 years participants underwent neurological, neuropsychological, and 3T-brain MRI examinations using identical study protocols that included voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging. Data were analyzed by (i) group comparisons between patients and controls at baseline and follow-up, and (ii) group comparisons using difference maps (baseline–follow-up in each participant) to focus on disease-related effects over time.

Results

We found minor neuropsychological deficits with mild progression in DM1 more than DM2. Daytime sleepiness was restricted to DM1, whereas fatigue was present in both disease entities and stable over time. Comparing results of cross-sectional neuroimaging analyses at baseline and follow-up revealed an unchanged pattern of pronounced white matter alterations in DM1. There was mild additional gray matter reduction in DM1 at follow-up. In DM2, white matter reduction was of lesser extent, but there were some additional alterations at follow-up. Gray matter seemed unaffected in DM2. Intriguingly, longitudinal analyses using difference maps and comparing them between patients and controls did not reveal any significant differences of cerebral changes over time between patients and controls.

Conclusion

The lack of significant disease-related progression of gray and white matter involvement over a period of five years in our cohort of DM1 and DM2 patients suggests either a rather slowly progressive process or even a stable course of cerebral changes in middle-aged adult-onset patients. Being the first longitudinal neuroimaging trial in DM1 and DM2, this study provides useful additional information regarding the natural history of brain involvement.

]]>
<![CDATA[Comparison of brain magnetic resonance imaging between myotonic dystrophy type 1 and cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c12cf6dd5eed0c4849145d0

Background

Anterior temporal lobe hyperintensities detected by brain MRI are a recognized imaging hallmark of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). Because similar findings may be present in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), the brain MRI in these two diseases is often misinterpreted. We compared the MRI findings between the two entities to examine whether they display distinctive characteristics.

Methods

This retrospective, cross-sectional study reviewed medical records of patients with DM1 or CADASIL admitted to Asan Medical Center between September 1999 and September 2017. We compared the frequency and grades of white matter changes in specific spatial regions between the groups according to age-related white matter change scores. We also evaluated the presence of cerebral microbleeds.

Results

A total of 29 patients with DM1 and 68 with CADASIL who had undergone MRI were included in the analysis. The overall prevalence of white matter hyperintensities was 20 (69%) and 66 (97%) in DM1 and CADASIL, respectively (p < 0.001), whereas the frequency of anterior temporal lobe hyperintensities was comparable between the groups (10 [34.5%] in DM1 vs. 35 [51.5%] in CADASIL, p = 0.125). The brain MRI of patients with DM1 revealed more limited involvement of the frontal, parieto-occipital, external capsule and basal ganglia regions compared with imaging in patients with CADASIL. Cerebral microbleeds were not observed in any case of DM1 but were present in 31 of 45 (68.9%) cases of CADASIL.

Conclusions

Anterior temporal lobe involvement in DM1 is not infrequent compared with CADASIL. However, because brain MRI in patients with DM1 lacks other distinctive features seen in CADASIL, imaging might assist in differentiating these two conditions.

]]>
<![CDATA[In silico discovery of substituted pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines and pentamidine-like compounds with biological activity in myotonic dystrophy models]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be0332

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a rare multisystemic disorder associated with an expansion of CUG repeats in mutant DMPK (dystrophia myotonica protein kinase) transcripts; the main effect of these expansions is the induction of pre-mRNA splicing defects by sequestering muscleblind-like family proteins (e.g. MBNL1). Disruption of the CUG repeats and the MBNL1 protein complex has been established as the best therapeutic approach for DM1, hence two main strategies have been proposed: targeted degradation of mutant DMPK transcripts and the development of CUG-binding molecules that prevent MBNL1 sequestration. Herein, suitable CUG-binding small molecules were selected using in silico approaches such as scaffold analysis, similarity searching, and druggability analysis. We used polarization assays to confirm the CUG repeat binding in vitro for a number of candidate compounds, and went on to evaluate the biological activity of the two with the strongest affinity for CUG repeats (which we refer to as compounds 12 and 25) in DM1 mutant cells and Drosophila DM1 models with an impaired locomotion phenotype. In particular, 12 and 25 enhanced the levels of free MBNL1 in patient-derived myoblasts in vitro and greatly improved DM1 fly locomotion in climbing assays. This work provides new computational approaches for rational large-scale virtual screens of molecules that selectively recognize CUG structures. Moreover, it contributes valuable knowledge regarding two compounds with desirable biological activity in DM1 models.

]]>
<![CDATA[Elevated plasma levels of cardiac troponin-I predict left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1: A multicentre cohort follow-up study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbf52

Objective

High sensitivity plasma cardiac troponin-I (cTnI) is emerging as a strong predictor of cardiac events in a variety of settings. We have explored its utility in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1).

Methods

117 patients with DM1 were recruited from routine outpatient clinics across three health boards. A single measurement of cTnI was made using the ARCHITECT STAT Troponin I assay. Demographic, ECG, echocardiographic and other clinical data were obtained from electronic medical records. Follow up was for a mean of 23 months.

Results

Fifty five females and 62 males (mean age 47.7 years) were included. Complete data were available for ECG in 107, echocardiography in 53. Muscle Impairment Rating Scale score was recorded for all patients. A highly significant excess (p = 0.0007) of DM1 patients presented with cTnI levels greater than the 99th centile of the range usually observed in the general population (9 patients; 7.6%). Three patients with elevated troponin were found to have left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD), compared with four of those with normal range cTnI (33.3% versus 3.7%; p = 0.001). Sixty two patients had a cTnI level < 5ng/L, of whom only one had documented evidence of LVSD. Elevated cTnI was not predictive of severe conduction abnormalities on ECG, or presence of a cardiac device, nor did cTnI level correlate with muscle strength expressed by Muscle Impairment Rating Scale score.

Conclusions

Plasma cTnI is highly elevated in some ambulatory patients with DM1 and shows promise as a tool to aid cardiac risk stratification, possibly by detecting myocardial involvement. Further studies with larger patient numbers are warranted to assess its utility in this setting.

]]>
<![CDATA[Six Serum miRNAs Fail to Validate as Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Biomarkers]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da34ab0ee8fa60b85c5c

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by expansion of a CTG microsatellite in the 3’ untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Despite characteristic muscular, cardiac, and neuropsychological symptoms, CTG trinucleotide repeats are unstable both in the somatic and germinal lines, making the age of onset, clinical presentation, and disease severity very variable. A molecular biomarker to stratify patients and to follow disease progression is, thus, an unmet medical need. Looking for a novel biomarker, and given that specific miRNAs have been found to be misregulated in DM1 heart and muscle tissues, we profiled the expression of 175 known serum miRNAs in DM1 samples. The differences detected between patients and controls were less than 2.6 fold for all of them and a selection of six candidate miRNAs, miR-103, miR-107, miR-21, miR-29a, miR-30c, and miR-652 all failed to show consistent differences in serum expression in subsequent validation experiments.

]]>
<![CDATA[“I Know that You Know that I Know”: Neural Substrates Associated with Social Cognition Deficits in DM1 Patients]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dabeab0ee8fa60bafae0

Myotonic dystrophy type-1 (DM1) is a genetic multi-systemic disorder involving several organs including the brain. Despite the heterogeneity of this condition, some patients with non-congenital DM1 can present with minimal cognitive impairment on formal testing but with severe difficulties in daily-living activities including social interactions. One explanation for this paradoxical mismatch can be found in patients’ dysfunctional social cognition, which can be assessed in the framework of the Theory of Mind (ToM). We hypothesize here that specific disease driven abnormalities in DM1 brains may result in ToM impairments. We recruited 20 DM1 patients who underwent the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” and the ToM-story tests. These patients, together with 18 healthy controls, also underwent resting-state functional MRI. A composite Theory of Mind score was computed for all recruited patients and correlated with their brain functional connectivity. This analysis provided the patients’ “Theory of Mind-network”, which was compared, for its topological properties, with that of healthy controls. We found that DM1 patients showed deficits in both tests assessing ToM. These deficits were associated with specific patterns of abnormal connectivity between the left inferior temporal and fronto-cerebellar nodes in DM1 brains. The results confirm the previous suggestions of ToM dysfunctions in patients with DM1 and support the hypothesis that difficulties in social interactions and personal relationships are a direct consequence of brain abnormalities, and not a reaction symptom. This is relevant not only for a better pathophysiological comprehension of DM1, but also for non-pharmacological interventions to improve clinical aspects and impact on patients’ success in life.

]]>
<![CDATA[Dose-Dependent Regulation of Alternative Splicing by MBNL Proteins Reveals Biomarkers for Myotonic Dystrophy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da82ab0ee8fa60b9b311

Alternative splicing is a regulated process that results in expression of specific mRNA and protein isoforms. Alternative splicing factors determine the relative abundance of each isoform. Here we focus on MBNL1, a splicing factor misregulated in the disease myotonic dystrophy. By altering the concentration of MBNL1 in cells across a broad dynamic range, we show that different splicing events require different amounts of MBNL1 for half-maximal response, and respond more or less steeply to MBNL1. Motifs around MBNL1 exon 5 were studied to assess how cis-elements mediate the MBNL1 dose-dependent splicing response. A framework was developed to estimate MBNL concentration using splicing responses alone, validated in the cell-based model, and applied to myotonic dystrophy patient muscle. Using this framework, we evaluated the ability of individual and combinations of splicing events to predict functional MBNL concentration in human biopsies, as well as their performance as biomarkers to assay mild, moderate, and severe cases of DM.

]]>
<![CDATA[Disease Phenotypes in a Mouse Model of RNA Toxicity Are Independent of Protein Kinase Cα and Protein Kinase Cβ]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e1ab0ee8fa60b698e4

Myotonic dystrophy type 1(DM1) is the prototype for diseases caused by RNA toxicity. RNAs from the mutant allele contain an expanded (CUG)n tract within the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. The toxic RNAs affect the function of RNA binding proteins leading to sequestration of muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins and increased levels of CELF1 (CUGBP, Elav-like family member 1). The mechanism for increased CELF1 is not very clear. One favored proposition is hyper-phosphorylation of CELF1 by Protein Kinase C alpha (PKCα) leading to increased CELF1 stability. However, most of the evidence supporting a role for PKC-α relies on pharmacological inhibition of PKC. To further investigate the role of PKCs in the pathogenesis of RNA toxicity, we generated transgenic mice with RNA toxicity that lacked both the PKCα and PKCβ isoforms. We find that these mice show similar disease progression as mice wildtype for the PKC isoforms. Additionally, the expression of CELF1 is also not affected by deficiency of PKCα and PKCβ in these RNA toxicity mice. These data suggest that disease phenotypes of these RNA toxicity mice are independent of PKCα and PKCβ.

]]>
<![CDATA[Toward a more personalized motor function rehabilitation in Myotonic dystrophy type 1: The role of neuroplasticity]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be002f

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most prevalent adult muscular dystrophy, often accompanied by impairments in attention, memory, visuospatial and executive functions. Given that DM1 is a multi-system disorder, it requires a multi-disciplinary approach, including effective rehabilitation programs, focusing on the central nervous system neuroplasticity, in order to develop patient-tailored rehabilitative procedures for motor function recovery. Herein, we performed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study aimed at investigating central motor conduction time, sensory-motor plasticity, and cortical excitability in 7 genetically defined DM1 patients. As compared to healthy individuals, DM1 patients showed a delayed central motor conduction time and an abnormal sensory-motor plasticity, with no alteration of cortical excitability. These findings may be useful to define patient-tailored motor rehabilitative programs.

]]>
<![CDATA[Noninvasive assessment of respiratory muscle strength and activity in Myotonic dystrophy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5dab0ee8fa60be0460

Objective

To evaluate sensitivity/specificity of the maximum relaxation rate (MRR) of inspiratory muscles, amplitude of electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), scalene (SCA), parasternal (2ndIS) and rectus abdominis (RA) muscles; lung function and respiratory muscle strength in subjects with Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) compared with healthy subjects.

Design and methods

Quasi-experimental observational study with control group. MRR of inspiratory muscles, lung function and amplitude of the electromyographic activity of SCM, SCA, 2ndIS and RA muscles during maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax), maximum expiratory pressure (PEmax) and sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) tests were assessed in eighteen DM1 subjects and eleven healthy.

Results

MRR was lower in DM1 group compared to healthy (P = 0.001) and was considered sensitive and specific to identify disease in DM1 and discard it in controls, as well as SNIP% (P = 0.0026), PImax% (P = 0.0077) and PEmax% (P = 0.0002). Contraction time of SCM and SCA was higher in DM1 compared to controls, respectively, during PImax (P = 0.023 and P = 0.017) and SNIP (P = 0.015 and P = .0004). The DM1 group showed lower PImax (P = .0006), PEmax (P = 0.0002), SNIP (P = 0.0014), and higher electromyographic activity of the SCM (P = 0.002) and SCA (P = 0.004) at rest; of 2ndIS (P = 0.003) during PEmax and of SCM (P = 0.02) and SCA (P = 0.03) during SNIP test.

Conclusions

MD1 subjects presented restrictive pattern, reduced respiratory muscle strength, muscular electrical activity and MRR when compared to higher compared to controls. In addition, the lower MRR found in MD1 subjects showed to be reliable to sensitivity and specificity in identifying the delayed relaxation of respiratory muscles.

]]>