ResearchPad - neurites https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Interplay between axonal Wnt5-Vang and dendritic Wnt5-Drl/Ryk signaling controls glomerular patterning in the <i>Drosophila</i> antennal lobe]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14504 During brain development, the processes of nerve cells, axons and dendrites, grow over long distances to find and connect with each other to form synapses in precise locations. Understanding the mechanisms that control the growth of these neurites is important for understanding normal brain functions like neuronal plasticity and neural diseases like autism. Although much progress has been made by studying the development of axons and dendrites separately, the mechanisms that guide neuronal processes to their final locations are still incompletely understood. In particular, careful observation of converging pre- and postsynaptic processes suggests that their targeting may be coordinated. Whether the final targeting of axons and dendrites are functionally linked and what molecular mechanisms may be involved are unknown. In this paper we show that, in the developing Drosophila olfactory circuit, coalescing axons and dendrites respond to the extracellular Wnt5 signal in a codependent manner. We demonstrate that the converging axons and dendrites contribute different signaling components to the Wnt5 pathway, the Vang Gogh and Derailed transmembrane receptors respectively, which allow Wnt5 to coordinately guide the targeting of the neurites. Our work thus reveals a novel mechanism of neural circuit patterning and the molecular mechanism that controls it.

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<![CDATA[Low-rate firing limit for neurons with axon, soma and dendrites driven by spatially distributed stochastic synapses]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13830 Neurons are extended cells with multiple branching dendrites, a cell body and an axon. In an active neuronal network, neurons receive vast numbers of incoming synaptic pulses throughout their dendrites and cell body that each exhibit significant variability in amplitude and arrival time. The resulting synaptic input causes voltage fluctuations throughout their structure that evolve in space and time. The dynamics of how these signals are integrated and how they ultimately trigger outgoing spikes have been modelled extensively since the late 1960s. However, until relatively recently the majority of the mathematical formulae describing how fluctuating synaptic drive triggers action potentials have been applicable only for small neurons with the dendritic and axonal structure ignored. This has been largely due to the mathematical complexity of including the effects of spatially distributed synaptic input. Here we show that in a physiologically relevant, low-firing-rate regime, an approximate level-crossing approach can be used to provide an estimate for the neuronal firing rate even when the dendrites and axons are included. We illustrate this approach using basic neuronal morphologies that capture the fundamentals of neuronal structure. Though the models are simple, these preliminary results show that it is possible to obtain useful formulae that capture the effects of spatially distributed synaptic drive. The generality of these results suggests they will provide a mathematical framework for future studies that might require the structure of neurons to be taken into account, such as the effect of electrical fields or multiple synaptic input streams that target distinct spatial domains of cortical pyramidal cells.

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<![CDATA[Exploring the effects of electrospun fiber surface nanotopography on neurite outgrowth and branching in neuron cultures]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c61e8c9d5eed0c48496f18d

Three aligned, electrospun fiber scaffolds with unique surface features were created from poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA). Fibers without surface nanotopography (smooth fibers), fibers with surface divots (shallow pits), and fibers with surface pits (deeper pits) were fabricated, and fiber alignment, diameter, and density were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Whole dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were isolated from rats and placed onto uncoated fibers or fibers coated with laminin. On uncoated fibers, neurite outgrowth was restricted by fibers displaying divoted or pitted nanotopography when compared to neurite outgrowth on smooth fibers. However, neurites extending from whole DRG cultured on laminin-coated fibers were not restricted by divoted or pitted surface nanotopography. Thus, neurites extending on laminin-coated fibers were able to extend long neurites even in the presence of surface divots or pits. To further explore this result, individual neurons isolated from dissociated DRG were seeded onto laminin-coated smooth, pitted, or divoted fibers. Interestingly, neurons on pitted or divoted fibers exhibited a 1.5-fold increase in total neurite length, and a 2.3 or 2.7-fold increase in neurite branching compared to neurons on smooth fibers, respectively. Based on these findings, we conclude that fiber roughness in the form of pits or divots can promote extension and branching of long neurites along aligned electrospun fibers in the presence of an extracellular matrix protein coating. Thus, aligned, electrospun fibers can be crafted to not only direct the extension of axons but to induce unique branching morphologies.

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<![CDATA[Neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects of CRMP-5 on retinal ganglion cells in an experimental in vivo and in vitro model of glaucoma]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c521853d5eed0c484797c19

Purpose

To analyze the potential neuro-protective and neuro-regenerative effects of Collapsin-response-mediator-protein-5 (CRMP-5) on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) using in vitro and in vivo animal models of glaucoma.

Methods

Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) was induced in adult female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats by cauterization of three episcleral veins. Changes in CRMP-5 expression within the retinal proteome were analyzed via label-free mass spectrometry. In vitro, retinal explants were cultured under elevated pressure (60 mmHg) within a high-pressure incubation chamber with and without addition of different concentrations of CRMP-5 (4 μg/l, 200 μg/l and 400 μg/l). In addition, retinal explants were cultured under regenerative conditions with and without application of 200 μg/l CRMP-5 after performing an optic nerve crush (ONC). Thirdly, an antibody against Protein Kinase B (PKB) was added to examine the possible effects of CRMP-5. RGC count was performed. Number and length of the axons were determined and compared. To undermine a signal-transduction pathway via CRMP-5 and PKB microarray and immunohistochemistry were performed.

Results

CRMP-5 was downregulated threefold in animals showing chronically elevated IOP. The addition of CRMP-5 to retinal culture significantly increased RGC numbers under pressure in a dose-dependent manner and increased and elongated outgrowing axons in retinal explants significantly which could be blocked by PKB. Especially the number of neurites longer than 400 μm significantly increased after application of CRMP-5. CRMP-5 as well as PKB were detected higher in the experimental than in the control group.

Conclusion

CRMP-5 seems to play an important role in an animal model of glaucoma. Addition of CRMP-5 exerts neuro-protective and neuro-regenerative effects in vitro. This effect could be mediated via activation of PKB affecting intra-cellular apoptosis pathways.

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<![CDATA[Site-specific HNK-1 epitope on alternatively spliced fibronectin type-III repeats in tenascin-C promotes neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons through contactin-1]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c40f81fd5eed0c48438711e

The human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate epitope, composed of a unique sulfated trisaccharide (HSO3–3GlcAβ1–3Galβ1–4GlcNAc-R), is highly expressed during brain development and regulates higher brain function. However, it remains unclear which glycoprotein carries the HNK-1 epitope in the embryonic brain and the functional role it plays. Here, we showed that one of the major HNK-1 carrier proteins in the embryonic brain is tenascin-C (TNC), an extracellular matrix protein that regulates neurite outgrowth by interacting with the GPI-anchored protein contactin-1 (CNTN). Because the alternatively spliced fibronectin type-III (FNIII) repeats in TNC give rise to many isoforms and affect neuronal function, we evaluated neurite outgrowth of primary hippocampal neurons on purified recombinant FNIII repeats with or without the HNK-1 epitope as a substrate. We found that the presence of the HNK-1 epitope on the C domain of TNC promoted neurite outgrowth, and that this signal was mediated by CNTN, which is an HNK-1-expressing neuronal receptor. The neurite-promoting activity of the HNK-1 epitope on TNC required neuronal HNK-1 expression, which was defective in neurons lacking the glucuronyltransferases GlcAT-P and GlcAT-S. These results suggest that the HNK-1 epitope is a key modifier of TNC and CNTN in the regulation of embryonic brain development.

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<![CDATA[The neuroanatomy of the siboglinid Riftia pachyptila highlights sedentarian annelid nervous system evolution]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c1c0ab1d5eed0c4844268d5

Tracing the evolution of the siboglinid group, peculiar group of marine gutless annelids, requires the detailed study of the fragmentarily explored central nervous system of vestimentiferans and other siboglinids. 3D reconstructions of the neuroanatomy of Riftia revealed that the “brain” of adult vestimentiferans is a fusion product of the supraesophageal and subesophageal ganglia. The supraesophageal ganglion-like area contains the following neural structures that are homologous to the annelid elements: the peripheral perikarya of the brain lobes, two main transverse commissures, mushroom-like structures, commissural cell cluster, and the circumesophageal connectives with two roots which give rise to the palp neurites. Three pairs of giant perikarya are located in the supraesophageal ganglion, giving rise to the paired giant axons. The circumesophageal connectives run to the VNC. The subesophageal ganglion-like area contains a tripartite ventral aggregation of perikarya (= the postoral ganglion of the VNC) interconnected by the subenteral commissure. The paired VNC is intraepidermal, not ganglionated over most of its length, associated with the ciliary field, and comprises the giant axons. The pairs of VNC and the giant axons fuse posteriorly. Within siboglinids, the vestimentiferans are distinguished by a large and considerably differentiated brain. This reflects the derived development of the tentacle crown. The tentacles of vestimentiferans are homologous to the annelid palps based on their innervation from the dorsal and ventral roots of the circumesophageal connectives. Neuroanatomy of the vestimentiferan brains is close to the brains of Cirratuliiformia and Spionida/Sabellida, which have several transverse commissures, specific position of the giant somata (if any), and palp nerve roots (if any). The palps and palp neurite roots originally developed in all main annelid clades (basally branching, errantian and sedentarian annelids), show the greatest diversity in their number in sedentarian species. Over the course of evolution of Sedentaria, the number of palps and their nerve roots either dramatically increased (as in vestimentiferan siboglinids) or were lost.

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<![CDATA[microRNA-2110 functions as an onco-suppressor in neuroblastoma by directly targeting Tsukushi]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c1d5bccd5eed0c4846eca00

microRNA-2110 (miR-2110) was previously identified as inducing neurite outgrowth in a neuroblastoma cell lines BE(2)-C, suggesting its differentiation-inducing and oncosuppressive function in neuroblastoma. In this study, we demonstrated that synthetic miR-2110 mimic had a generic effect on reducing cell survival in neuroblastoma cell lines with distinct genetic backgrounds, although the induction of cell differentiation traits varied between cell lines. In investigating the mechanisms underlying such functions of miR-2110, we identified that among its predicted target genes down-regulated by miR-2110, knockdown of Tsukushi (TSKU) expression showed the most potent effect in inducing cell differentiation and reducing cell survival, suggesting that TSKU protein plays a key role in mediating the functions of miR-2110. In investigating the clinical relevance of miR-2110 and TSKU expression in neuroblastoma patients, we found that low tumor miR-2110 levels were significantly correlated with high tumor TSKU mRNA levels, and that both low miR-2110 and high TSKU mRNA levels were significantly correlated with poor patient survival. These findings altogether support the oncosuppressive function of miR-2110 and suggest an important role for miR-2110 and its target TSKU in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis and in determining patient prognosis.

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<![CDATA[Cholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine enhances nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells via sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c215139d5eed0c4843f9398

Rivastigmine (Riv) is a potent and selective cholinesterase (acetylcholinesterase, AChE and butyrylcholinesterase, BuChE) inhibitor developed for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To elucidate whether Riv causes neuronal differentiation, we examined its effect on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. At concentrations of 0–100 μM, Riv was non-toxic in PC12 cells. Riv caused dose-dependent (10–100 μM) enhancement of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, which was completely inhibited by the TrkA antagonist GW-441756. By contrast, Riv-mediated enhancement of neurite outgrowth was not blocked by the acetylcholine receptor antagonists, scopolamine and hexamethonium. However, the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) antagonist NE-100 and sigma-2 receptor (Sig-2R) antagonist SM-21 each blocked about half of the Riv-mediated enhancement of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Interestingly, the simultaneous application of NE-100 and SM-21 completely blocked the enhancement of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by Riv. These findings suggest that both Sig-1R and Sig-2R play important roles in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth through TrkA and that Riv may contribute to neuronal repair via Sig-1R and Sig-2R in AD therapy.

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<![CDATA[Lactosylceramide synthases encoded by B4galt5 and 6 genes are pivotal for neuronal generation and myelin formation in mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b8b29d640307c405292ca4e

It is uncertain which β4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT; gene name, B4galt), β4GalT-5 and/or β4GalT-6, is responsible for the production of lactosylceramide (LacCer) synthase, which functions in the initial step of ganglioside biosynthesis. Here, we generated conditional B4galt5 knockout (B4galt5 cKO) mice, using Nestin-Cre mice, and crossed these with B4galt6 KO mice to generate B4galt5 and 6 double KO (DKO) mice in the central nervous system (CNS). LacCer synthase activity and major brain gangliosides were completely absent in brain homogenates from the DKO mice, although LacCer synthase activity was about half its normal level in B4galt5 cKO mice and B4galt6 KO mice. The DKO mice were born normally but they showed growth retardation and motor deficits at 2 weeks and died by 4 weeks of age. Histological analyses showed that myelin-associated proteins were rarely found localized in axons in the cerebral cortex, and axonal and myelin formation were remarkably impaired in the spinal cords of the DKO mice. Neuronal cells, differentiated from neurospheres that were prepared from the DKO mice, showed impairments in neurite outgrowth and branch formation, which can be explained by the fact that neurospheres from DKO mice could weakly interact with laminin due to lack of gangliosides, such as GM1a. Furthermore, the neurons were immature and perineuronal nets (PNNs) were poorly formed in DKO cerebral cortices. Our results indicate that LacCer synthase is encoded by B4galt5 and 6 genes in the CNS, and that gangliosides are indispensable for neuronal maturation, PNN formation, and axonal and myelin formation.

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<![CDATA[Recurrent Inhibition to the Medial Nucleus of the Trapezoid Body in the Mongolian Gerbil (Meriones Unguiculatus)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e4ab0ee8fa60b6abdc

Principal neurons in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) receive strong and temporally precise excitatory input from globular bushy cells in the cochlear nucleus through the calyx of Held. The extremely large synaptic currents produced by the calyx have sometimes led to the view of the MNTB as a simple relay synapse which converts incoming excitation to outgoing inhibition. However, electrophysiological and anatomical studies have shown the additional presence of inhibitory glycinergic currents that are large enough to suppress action potentials in MNTB neurons at least in some cases. The source(s) of glycinergic inhibition to MNTB are not fully understood. One major extrinsic source of glycinergic inhibitory input to MNTB is the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body. However, it has been suggested that MNTB neurons receive additional inhibitory inputs via intrinsic connections (collaterals of glycinergic projections of MNTB neurons). While several authors have postulated their presence, these collaterals have never been examined in detail. Here we test the hypothesis that collaterals of MNTB principal cells provide glycinergic inhibition to the MNTB. We injected dye into single principal neurons in the MNTB, traced their projections, and immunohistochemically identified their synapses. We found that collaterals terminate within the MNTB and provide an additional source of inhibition to other principal cells, creating an inhibitory microcircuit within the MNTB. Only about a quarter to a third of MNTB neurons receive such collateral inputs. This microcircuit could produce side band inhibition and enhance frequency tuning of MNTB neurons, consistent with physiological observations.

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<![CDATA[Altered mRNA Splicing in SMN-Depleted Motor Neuron-Like Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da41ab0ee8fa60b8a062

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an intractable neurodegenerative disease afflicting 1 in 6–10,000 live births. One of the key functions of the SMN protein is regulation of spliceosome assembly. Reduced levels of the SMN protein that are observed in SMA have been shown to result in aberrant mRNA splicing. SMN-dependent mis-spliced transcripts in motor neurons may cause stresses that are particularly harmful and may serve as potential targets for the treatment of motor neuron disease or as biomarkers in the SMA patient population. We performed deep RNA sequencing using motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells to screen for SMN-dependent mRNA processing changes that occur following acute depletion of SMN. We identified SMN-dependent splicing changes, including an intron retention event that results in the production of a truncated Rit1 transcript. This intron-retained transcript is stable and is mis-spliced in spinal cord from symptomatic SMA mice. Constitutively active Rit1 ameliorated the neurite outgrowth defect in SMN depleted NSC-34 cells, while expression of the truncated protein product of the mis-spliced Rit1 transcript inhibited neurite extension. These results reveal new insights into the biological consequence of SMN-dependent splicing in motor neuron-like cells.

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<![CDATA[N-terminal Huntingtin Knock-In Mice: Implications of Removing the N-terminal Region of Huntingtin for Therapy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da41ab0ee8fa60b8a2db

The Huntington’s disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is a large protein consisting of 3144 amino acids and has conserved N-terminal sequences that are followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat. Loss of Htt is known to cause embryonic lethality in mice, whereas polyQ expansion leads to adult neuronal degeneration. Whether N-terminal HTT is essential for neuronal development or contributes only to late-onset neurodegeneration remains unknown. We established HTT knock-in mice (N160Q-KI) expressing the first 208 amino acids of HTT with 160Q, and they show age-dependent HTT aggregates in the brain and neurological phenotypes. Importantly, the N-terminal mutant HTT also preferentially accumulates in the striatum, the brain region most affected in HD, indicating the importance of N-terminal HTT in selective neuropathology. That said, homozygous N160Q-KI mice are also embryonic lethal, suggesting that N-terminal HTT alone is unable to support embryonic development. Using Htt knockout neurons, we found that loss of Htt selectively affects the survival of developing neuronal cells, but not astrocytes, in culture. This neuronal degeneration could be rescued by a truncated HTT lacking the first 237 amino acids, but not by N-terminal HTT (1–208 amino acids). Also, the rescue effect depends on the region in HTT known to be involved in intracellular trafficking. Thus, the N-terminal HTT region may not be essential for the survival of developing neurons, but when carrying a large polyQ repeat, can cause selective neuropathology. These findings imply a possible therapeutic benefit of removing the N-terminal region of HTT containing the polyQ repeat to treat the neurodegeneration in HD.

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<![CDATA[Endoplasmic Reticulum-Localized Transmembrane Protein Dpy19L1 Is Required for Neurite Outgrowth]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daabab0ee8fa60ba94da

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), including the nuclear envelope, is a continuous and intricate membrane-bound organelle responsible for various cellular functions. In neurons, the ER network is found in cell bodies, axons, and dendrites. Recent studies indicate the involvement of the ER network in neuronal development, such as neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth. However, the regulation of neural development by ER-localized proteins is not fully understood. We previously reported that the multi-transmembrane protein Dpy19L1 is required for neuronal migration in the developing mouse cerebral cortex. A Dpy19L family member, Dpy19L2, which is a causative gene for human Globozoospermia, is suggested to act as an anchor of the acrosome to the nuclear envelope. In this study, we found that the patterns of exogenous Dpy19L1 were partially coincident with the ER, including the nuclear envelope in COS-7 cells at the level of the light microscope. The reticular distribution of Dpy19L1 was disrupted by microtubule depolymerization that induces retraction of the ER. Furthermore, Dpy19L1 showed a similar distribution pattern with a ER marker protein in embryonic mouse cortical neurons. Finally, we showed that Dpy19L1 knockdown mediated by siRNA resulted in decreased neurite outgrowth in cultured neurons. These results indicate that transmembrane protein Dpy19L1 is localized to the ER membrane and regulates neurite extension during development.

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<![CDATA[Rabies Internalizes into Primary Peripheral Neurons via Clathrin Coated Pits and Requires Fusion at the Cell Body]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da60ab0ee8fa60b90d8e

The single glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RABV) dictates all viral entry steps from receptor engagement to membrane fusion. To study the uptake of RABV into primary neuronal cells in culture, we generated a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus in which the G protein was replaced with that of the neurotropic RABV CVS-11 strain (rVSV CVS G). Using microfluidic compartmentalized culture, we examined the uptake of single virions into the termini of primary neurons of the dorsal root ganglion and ventral spinal cord. By pharmacologically disrupting endocytosis at the distal neurites, we demonstrate that rVSV CVS G uptake and infection are dependent on dynamin. Imaging of single virion uptake with fluorescent endocytic markers further identifies endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits as the predominant internalization mechanism. Transmission electron micrographs also reveal the presence of viral particles in vesicular structures consistent with incompletely coated clathrin pits. This work extends our previous findings of clathrin-mediated uptake of RABV into epithelial cells to two neuronal subtypes involved in rabies infection in vivo. Chemical perturbation of endosomal acidification in the neurite or somal compartment further shows that establishment of infection requires pH-dependent fusion of virions at the cell body. These findings correlate infectivity to existing single particle evidence of long-range endosomal transport of RABV and clathrin dependent uptake at the plasma membrane.

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<![CDATA[Neurogenic Effects of Cell-Free Extracts of Adipose Stem Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da28ab0ee8fa60b8171a

Stem-cell-based therapies are regarded as promising treatments for neurological disorders, and adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a feasible source of clinical application of stem cell. Recent studies have shown that stem cells have a therapeutic potential for use in the treatment of various illnesses through paracrine action. To examine the effects of cell components of ASCs on neural stem cells (NSCs), we treated cell-free extracts of ASCs (CFE-ASCs) containing various components with brain-derived NSCs. To elucidate the effects of CFE-ASCs in NSC proliferation, we treated mouse subventricular zone-derived cultured NSCs with various doses of CFE-ASCs. As a result, CFE-ASCs were found to induce the proliferation of NSCs under conditions of growth factor deprivation in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.01). CFE-ASCs increase the expression of neuron and astrocyte differentiation markers including Tuj-1 (p<0.05) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (p<0.01) without altering the cell’s fate in differentiating NSCs. In addition, treatment with CFE-ASCs induces an increase in neurite numbers (p<0.01) and lengths of NSCs (p<0.05). Furthermore, CFE-ASCs rescue the hydrogen peroxide-induced reduction of NSCs’ viability (p<0.05) and neurite branching (p<0.01). Findings from our study indicate that CFE-ASCs support the survival, proliferation and differentiation of NSCs accompanied with neurite outgrowth, suggesting that CFE-ASCs can modulate neurogenesis in the central nervous system.

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<![CDATA[Primary Postnatal Dorsal Root Ganglion Culture from Conventionally Slaughtered Calves]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da0dab0ee8fa60b786da

Neurological disorders in ruminants have an important impact on veterinary health, but very few host-specific in vitro models have been established to study diseases affecting the nervous system. Here we describe a primary neuronal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) culture derived from calves after being conventionally slaughtered for food consumption. The study focuses on the in vitro characterization of bovine DRG cell populations by immunofluorescence analysis. The effects of various growth factors on neuron viability, neurite outgrowth and arborisation were evaluated by morphological analysis. Bovine DRG neurons are able to survive for more than 4 weeks in culture. GF supplementation is not required for neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth. However, exogenously added growth factors promote neurite outgrowth. DRG cultures from regularly slaughtered calves represent a promising and sustainable host specific model for the investigation of pain and neurological diseases in bovines.

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<![CDATA[CaMKII-Mediated CREB Phosphorylation Is Involved in Ca2+-Induced BDNF mRNA Transcription and Neurite Outgrowth Promoted by Electrical Stimulation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da7cab0ee8fa60b98d89

Electrical stimulation (ES)-triggered up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurite outgrowth in cultured rat postnatal dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs) is calcium (Ca2+)-dependent. The effects of increased Ca2+ on BDNF up-regulation and neurite outgrowth remain unclear. We showed here that ES increased phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Blockade of Ca2+ suppressed CREB phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth. Down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-CREB reduced BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. Furthermore, blockade of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) using the inhibitors KN93 or KN62 reduced p-CREB, and specific knockdown of the CaMKIIα or CaMKIIβ subunit was sufficient to suppress p-CREB. Recombinant BDNF or hyperforin reversed the effects of Ca2+ blockade and CaMKII knockdown. Taken together, these data establish a potential signaling pathway of Ca2+-CaMKII-CREB in neuronal activation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the mechanisms of Ca2+-dependent BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. These findings might help further investigation of complex molecular signaling networks in ES-triggered nerve regeneration in vivo.

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<![CDATA[Overexpression of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1) in a Model of Spinal Cord Injury in Rats]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da00ab0ee8fa60b73b22

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severe condition that affects many people and results in high health care costs. Therefore, it is essential to find new targets for treatment. The fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) signalling pathway has a history of being explored for SCI treatment. Several groups have examined the effect of high availability of different FGFR1 ligands at the injury site and reported corticospinal tract (CST) regeneration as well as improved motor functions. In this study, we investigated overexpression of the FGFR1 in rat corticospinal neurons in vivo after injury (unilateral pyramidotomy) and in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) in vitro. We show that overexpression of FGFR1 using AAV1 intracortical injections did not increase sprouting of the treated corticospinal tract and did not improve dexterity or walking in a rat model of SCI. Furthermore, we show that overexpression of FGFR1 in vitro resulted in decreased neurite outgrowth compared to control. Thus, our results suggest that the FGFR1 is not a suitable therapeutic target after SCI.

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<![CDATA[Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on BDNF-release and neuroprotection: Investigations with human mesenchymal stem cells and genetically modified NIH3T3 fibroblasts as putative cell therapeutics]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60bdff9d

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a noninvasive widely applied treatment that increases the oxygen pressure in tissues. In cochlear implant (CI) research, intracochlear application of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) is able to improve survival of spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) after deafness. Cell-based delivery of NTFs such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may be realized by cell-coating of the surface of the CI electrode. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) secrete a variety of different neurotrophic factors and may be used for the development of a biohybrid electrode in order to release endogenously-derived neuroprotective factors for the protection of residual SGN and for a guided outgrowth of dendrites in the direction of the CI electrode. HBOT could be used to influence cell behaviour after transplantation to the inner ear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HBOT on the proliferation, BDNF-release and secretion of neuroprotective factors. Thus, model cells (an immortalized fibroblast cell line (NIH3T3)–native and genetically modified) and MSCs were repeatedly (3 x – 10 x) exposed to 100% oxygen at different pressures. The effects of HBO on cell proliferation were investigated in relation to normoxic and normobaric conditions (NOR). Moreover, the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects of HBO-treated cells were analysed by cultivation of SGN in conditioned medium. Both, the genetically modified NIH3T3/BDNF and native NIH3T3 fibroblasts, showed a highly significant increased proliferation after five days of HBOT in comparison to normoxic controls. By contrast, the number of MSCs was decreased in MSCs treated with 2.0 bar of HBO. Treating SGN cultures with supernatants of fibroblasts and MSCs significantly increased the survival rate of SGN. HBO treatment did not influence (increase / reduce) this effect. Secretome analysis showed that HBO treatment altered the protein expression pattern in MSCs.

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<![CDATA[CDKL5 and Shootin1 Interact and Concur in Regulating Neuronal Polarization]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dab6ab0ee8fa60bad167

In the last years, the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene has been associated with epileptic encephalopathies characterized by the early onset of intractable epilepsy, severe developmental delay, autistic features, and often the development of Rett syndrome-like features. Still, the role of CDKL5 in neuronal functions is not fully understood. By way of a yeast two hybrid screening we identified the interaction of CDKL5 with shootin1, a brain specific protein acting as a determinant of axon formation during neuronal polarization. We found evidence that CDKL5 is involved, at least in part, in regulating neuronal polarization through its interaction with shootin1. Indeed, the two proteins interact in vivo and both are localized in the distal tip of outgrowing axons. By using primary hippocampal neurons as model system we find that adequate CDKL5 levels are required for axon specification. In fact, a significant number of neurons overexpressing CDKL5 is characterized by supernumerary axons, while the silencing of CDKL5 disrupts neuronal polarization. Interestingly, shootin1 phosphorylation is reduced in neurons silenced for CDKL5 suggesting that the kinase affects, directly or indirectly, the post-translational modification of shootin1. Finally, we find that the capacity of CDKL5 to generate surplus axons is attenuated in neurons with reduced shootin1 levels, in agreement with the notion that two proteins act in a common pathway. Altogether, these results point to a role of CDKL5 in the early steps of neuronal differentiation that can be explained, at least in part, by its association with shootin1.

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