ResearchPad - pelvis https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Canine hip dysplasia screening: Comparison of early evaluation to final grading in 231 dogs with Fédération Cynologique Internationale A and B]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_15741 This study aimed to verify if a significant difference exists between parameters in the early evaluation of normal and near-normal hip joints, to evaluate the influence of age and breed on the parameters, and to clarify the usefulness of a total score for differentiating between Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) grade A and B hips.MethodsA total of 231 dogs were classified according to whether they had FCI A or B hips at adulthood, with measurements obtained at 14–28 weeks of age. The total score was calculated by the summation of the following quantitative parameters: angle of subluxation (AS), angle of reduction (AR), laxity index (LI), and dorsal acetabular rim slope (DARS). Logistic regression analysis was performed to establish the probability of the study population to develop an FCI B hip based on the total score. This was repeated for the highest score in combination with the worst-rated hip and once more for breeds.ResultsNo correlation between age and the parameters was found in the cohort, or for FCI A and B. The values of all the parameters were significantly lower in the FCI A group than in the FCI B group (AR: 4.42° ± 6.0° vs 7.62° ± 7.2°; AS: 0.45° ± 1.9° vs 1.55° ± 3.8°; LI: 0.32 ± 0.1 vs 0.36 ± 0.1; DARS: 3.30° ± 1.8° vs 3.77° ± 1.9°; TS: 11.47 ± 8.3 vs 16.65 ± 10.9). Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers showed significant differences between parameters for both FCI grades. The range, where FCI A and B hips can be predicted on the basis of the total score, was different when assessed for the entire cohort, Labrador Retrievers, and Golden Retrievers.Clinical significanceOur results show that even in normal and near-normal hips, the parameters significantly differed in the early evaluation. Moreover, cutoff values should be set for different breeds in the prediction of the FCI grade during early evaluation for a better breeding selection regarding canine hip dysplasia, one of the most common orthopedic diseases among large and giant breed dogs. ]]> <![CDATA[Discriminant validity of 3D joint kinematics and centre of mass displacement measured by inertial sensor technology during the unipodal stance task]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14569 The unipodal stance task is a clinical task that quantifies postural stability and alignment of the lower limb joints, while weight bearing on one leg. As persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) have poor postural and knee joint stability, objective assessment of this task might be useful.ObjectiveTo investigate the discriminant validity of three-dimensional joint kinematics and centre of mass displacement (COM) between healthy controls and persons with knee KOA, during unipodal stance using inertial sensors. Additionally, the reliability, agreement and construct validity are assessed to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of the discriminating parameters.MethodsTwenty healthy controls and 19 persons with unilateral severe KOA were included. Five repetitions of the unipodal stance task were simultaneously recorded by an inertial sensor system and a camera-based system (gold standard). Statistical significant differences in kinematic waveforms between healthy controls and persons with severe knee KOA were determined using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping (SPM1D).ResultsPersons with severe knee KOA had more lateral trunk lean towards the contralateral leg, more hip flexion throughout the performance of the unipodal stance task, more pelvic obliquity and COM displacement towards the contralateral side. However, for the latter two parameters the minimum detectable change was greater than the difference between healthy controls and persons with severe knee KOA. The construct validity was good (coefficient of multiple correlation 0.75, 0.83 respectively) and the root mean squared error (RMSE) was low (RMSE <1.5°) for the discriminant parameters.ConclusionInertial sensor based movement analysis can discriminate between healthy controls and persons with severe knee KOA for lateral trunk lean and hip flexion, but unfortunately not for the knee angles. Further research is required to improve the reproducibility and accuracy of the inertial sensor measurements before they can be used to assess differences in tasks with a small range of motion. ]]> <![CDATA[Special footwear designed for pregnant women and its effect on kinematic gait parameters during pregnancy and postpartum period]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13821 During pregnancy, an array of changes occurs in women body to enable the growth and development of the future baby and the consequent delivery. These changes are reflected in the range of motion of trunk, pelvis, lower limbs and other body segments, affect the locomotion and some of these changes may persist to the postpartum period. The aim of this study was to describe the changes affecting the gait during pregnancy and to determine the effect of tested footwear on kinematic gait characteristics during pregnancy as previous studies indicate that special orthopaedic insoles and footwear might be useful in prevention of the common musculoskeletal pain and discomfort related to pregnancy. Participants from the control group (n = 18), without any intervention, and the experimental group (n = 23), which was wearing the tested shoes, were measured at their 14, 28 and 37 gestational weeks and 28 weeks postpartum to capture the complete pregnancy-related changes in gait. The gait 3D kinematic data were obtained using Simi Motion System. The differences between the control and experimental group at the first data collection session in most of the analysed variables, as well as relatively high standard deviations of analysed variables indicate large individual differences in the gait pattern. The effect of tested footwear on kinematic gait pattern changes may be explained by its preventive effect against the foot arches falling. In the control group, changes associated previously with the foot arches falling and hindfoot hyperpronation were observed during advanced phases of pregnancy and postpartum, e.g. increase in knee flexion or increase in spinal curvature. For the comprehensive evaluation of the tested footwear on pregnancy gait pattern, future studies combining the kinematic and dynamic plantographic methods are needed.

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<![CDATA[Editorial Comment: Diagnostic ureteroscopy prior to nephroureterectomy for urothelial carcinoma is associated with a high risk of bladder recurrence despite technical precautions to avoid tumor spillage]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N170ab266-ecd2-4c95-83f5-2da2f74819eb ]]> <![CDATA[Postural control of a musculoskeletal model against multidirectional support surface translations]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c897754d5eed0c4847d2a0a

The human body is a complex system driven by hundreds of muscles, and its control mechanisms are not sufficiently understood. To understand the mechanisms of human postural control, neural controller models have been proposed by different research groups, including our feed-forward and feedback control model. However, these models have been evaluated under forward and backward perturbations, at most. Because a human body experiences perturbations from many different directions in daily life, neural controller models should be evaluated in response to multidirectional perturbations, including in the forward/backward, lateral, and diagonal directions. The objective of this study was to investigate the validity of an NC model with FF and FB control under multidirectional perturbations. We developed a musculoskeletal model with 70 muscles and 15 degrees of freedom of joints, positioned it in a standing posture by using the neural controller model, and translated its support surface in multiple directions as perturbations. We successfully determined the parameters of the neural controller model required to maintain the stance of the musculoskeletal model for each perturbation direction. The trends in muscle response magnitudes and the magnitude of passive ankle stiffness were consistent with the results of experimental studies. We conclude that the neural controller model can adapt to multidirectional perturbations by generating suitable muscle activations. We anticipate that the neural controller model could be applied to the study of the control mechanisms of patients with torso tilt and diagnosis of the change in control mechanisms from patients’ behaviors.

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<![CDATA[Affordable gait analysis using augmented reality markers]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f1519d5eed0c48467adab

A typical optical based gait analysis laboratory uses expensive stereophotogrammetric motion capture systems. The study aims to propose and validate an affordable gait analysis method using augmented reality (AR) markers with a single action camera. Image processing software calculates the position and orientation of the AR markers. Anatomical landmark calibration is applied on the subject to calibrate each of the anatomical points with respect to their corresponding AR markers. This way, anatomical points are tracked through AR markers using homogeneous coordinate transformations, and the further processing of gait analysis is identical with conventional solutions. The proposed system was validated on nine participants of varying age using a conventional motion capture system on simultaneously measured treadmill gait trials on 2, 3 and 4.5 km/h walking speeds. Coordinates of the virtual anatomical points were compared using the Bland-Altman analysis. Spatial-temporal gait parameters (step length, stride length, walking base, cadence, pelvis range of motion) and angular gait parameters (range of motion of knee, hip and pelvis angles) were compared between measurement systems by RMS error and Bland-Altman analysis. The proposed method shows some differences in the raw coordinates of virtually tracked anatomical landmarks and gait parameters compared to the reference system. RMS errors of spatial parameters were below 23 mm, while the angular range of motion RMS errors varies from 2.55° to 6.73°. Some of these differences (e.g. knee angle range of motion) is comparable to previously reported differences between commercial motion capture systems and gait variability. The proposed method can be a very cheap gait analysis solution, but precision is not guaranteed for every aspect of gait analysis using the currently exemplified implementation of the AR marker tracking approach.

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<![CDATA[Anatomy of the dinosaur Pampadromaeus barberenai (Saurischia—Sauropodomorpha) from the Late Triassic Santa Maria Formation of southern Brazil]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c76fe1bd5eed0c484e5b4e9

Sauropodomorphs are the most abundant and diverse clade of Triassic dinosaurs, but the taxonomy of their earliest (Carnian) representatives is still poorly understood. One such taxon is Pampadromaeus barberenai, represented by a nearly complete disarticulated skeleton recovered from the upper part of the Santa Maria Formation of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Here, the osteology of Pam. barberenai is fully described for the first time. Detailed comparisons with other Carnian sauropodomorphs reveal a unique anatomy, corroborating its status as a valid species. Potential autapomorphies of Pam. barberenai can be seen in the articulation of the sacral zygapophyses, the length of the pectoral epipodium, the shape of the distal articulation of the femur and the proximal articulation of metatarsal 1. A novel phylogenetic study shows that relationships among the Carnian sauropodomorphs are poorly constrained, possibly because they belong to a “zone of variability”, where homoplasy abounds. Yet, there is some evidence that Pam. barberenai may nest within Saturnaliidae, along with Saturnalia tupiniquim and Chromogisaurus novasi, which represents the sister group to the larger sauropodomorphs, i.e. Bagualosauria.

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<![CDATA[Minimal medical imaging can accurately reconstruct geometric bone models for musculoskeletal models]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6b26b8d5eed0c484289f10

Accurate representation of subject-specific bone anatomy in lower-limb musculoskeletal models is important for human movement analyses and simulations. Mathematical methods can reconstruct geometric bone models using incomplete imaging of bone by morphing bone model templates, but the validity of these methods has not been fully explored. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimal imaging requirements for accurate reconstruction of geometric bone models. Complete geometric pelvis and femur models of 14 healthy adults were reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging through segmentation. From each complete bone segmentation, three sets of incomplete segmentations (set 1 being the most incomplete) were created to test the effect of imaging incompleteness on reconstruction accuracy. Geometric bone models were reconstructed from complete sets, three incomplete sets, and two motion capture-based methods. Reconstructions from (in)complete sets were generated using statistical shape modelling, followed by host-mesh and local-mesh fitting through the Musculoskeletal Atlas Project Client. Reconstructions from motion capture-based methods used positional data from skin surface markers placed atop anatomic landmarks and estimated joint centre locations as target points for statistical shape modelling and linear scaling. Accuracy was evaluated with distance error (mm) and overlapping volume similarity (%) between complete bone segmentation and reconstructed bone models, and statistically compared using a repeated measure analysis of variance (p<0.05). Motion capture-based methods produced significantly higher distance error than reconstructions from (in)complete sets. Pelvis volume similarity reduced significantly with the level of incompleteness: complete set (92.70±1.92%), set 3 (85.41±1.99%), set 2 (81.22±3.03%), set 1 (62.30±6.17%), motion capture-based statistical shape modelling (41.18±9.54%), and motion capture-based linear scaling (26.80±7.19%). A similar trend was observed for femur volume similarity. Results indicate that imaging two relevant bone regions produces overlapping volume similarity >80% compared to complete segmented bone models, and improve analyses and simulation over current standard practice of linear scaling musculoskeletal models.

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<![CDATA[Automatic real-time gait event detection in children using deep neural networks]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5ca2a9d5eed0c48441e836

Annotation of foot-contact and foot-off events is the initial step in post-processing for most quantitative gait analysis workflows. If clean force plate strikes are present, the events can be automatically detected. Otherwise, annotation of gait events is performed manually, since reliable automatic tools are not available. Automatic annotation methods have been proposed for normal gait, but are usually based on heuristics of the coordinates and velocities of motion capture markers placed on the feet. These heuristics do not generalize to pathological gait due to greater variability in kinematics and anatomy of patients, as well as the presence of assistive devices. In this paper, we use a data-driven approach to predict foot-contact and foot-off events from kinematic and marker time series in children with normal and pathological gait. Through analysis of 9092 gait cycle measurements we build a predictive model using Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) artificial neural networks. The best-performing model identifies foot-contact and foot-off events with an average error of 10 and 13 milliseconds respectively, outperforming popular heuristic-based approaches. We conclude that the accuracy of our approach is sufficient for most clinical and research applications in the pediatric population. Moreover, the LSTM architecture enables real-time predictions, enabling applications for real-time control of active assistive devices, orthoses, or prostheses. We provide the model, usage examples, and the training code in an open-source package.

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<![CDATA[Predicting ambulatory energy expenditure in lower limb amputees using multi-sensor methods]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5ca28cd5eed0c48441e5dd

Purpose

To assess the validity of a derived algorithm, combining tri-axial accelerometry and heart rate (HR) data, compared to a research-grade multi-sensor physical activity device, for the estimation of ambulatory physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in individuals with traumatic lower-limb amputation.

Methods

Twenty-eight participants [unilateral (n = 9), bilateral (n = 10) with lower-limb amputations, and non-injured controls (n = 9)] completed eight activities; rest, ambulating at 5 progressive treadmill velocities (0.48, 0.67, 0.89, 1.12, 1.34m.s-1) and 2 gradients (3 and 5%) at 0.89m.s-1. During each task, expired gases were collected for the determination of V˙O2 and subsequent calculation of PAEE. An Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer was worn on the hip of the shortest residual limb and, a HR monitor and an Actiheart (AHR) device were worn on the chest. Multiple linear regressions were employed to derive population-specific PAEE estimated algorithms using Actigraph GT3X+ outputs and HR signals (GT3X+HR). Mean bias±95% Limits of Agreement (LoA) and error statistics were calculated between criterion PAEE (indirect calorimetry) and PAEE predicted using GT3X+HR and AHR.

Results

Both measurement approaches used to predict PAEE were significantly related (P<0.01) with criterion PAEE. GT3X+HR revealed the strongest association, smallest LoA and least error. Predicted PAEE (GT3X+HR; unilateral; r = 0.92, bilateral; r = 0.93, and control; r = 0.91, and AHR; unilateral; r = 0.86, bilateral; r = 0.81, and control; r = 0.67). Mean±SD percent error across all activities were 18±14%, 15±12% and 15±14% for the GT3X+HR and 45±20%, 39±23% and 34±28% in the AHR model, for unilateral, bilateral and control groups, respectively.

Conclusions

Statistically derived algorithms (GT3X+HR) provide a more valid estimate of PAEE in individuals with traumatic lower-limb amputation, compared to a proprietary group calibration algorithm (AHR). Outputs from AHR displayed considerable random error when tested in a laboratory setting in individuals with lower-limb amputation.

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<![CDATA[Which osteoarthritic gait features recover following total knee replacement surgery?]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c79afe0d5eed0c4841e38ee

Background

Gait analysis can be used to measure variations in joint function in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and is useful when observing longitudinal biomechanical changes following Total Knee Replacement (TKR) surgery. The Cardiff Classifier is an objective classification tool applied previously to examine the extent of biomechanical recovery following TKR. In this study, it is further developed to reveal the salient features that contribute to recovery towards healthy function.

Methods

Gait analysis was performed on 30 patients before and after TKR surgery, and 30 healthy controls. Median TKR follow-up time was 13 months. The combined application of principal component analysis (PCA) and the Cardiff Classifier defined 18 biomechanical features that discriminated OA from healthy gait. Statistical analysis tested whether these features were affected by TKR surgery and, if so, whether they recovered to values found for the controls.

Results

The Cardiff Classifier successfully discriminated between OA and healthy gait in all 60 cases. Of the 18 discriminatory features, only six (33%) were significantly affected by surgery, including features in all three planes of the ground reaction force (p<0.001), ankle dorsiflexion moment (p<0.001), hip adduction moment (p = 0.003), and transverse hip angle (p = 0.007). All but two (89%) of these features remained significantly different to those of the control group after surgery.

Conclusions

This approach was able to discriminate gait biomechanics associated with knee OA. The ground reaction force provided the strongest discriminatory features. Despite increased gait velocity and improvements in self-reported pain and function, which would normally be clinical indicators of recovery, the majority of features were not affected by TKR surgery. This TKR cohort retained pre-operative gait patterns; reduced sagittal hip and knee moments, decreased knee flexion, increased hip flexion, and reduced hip adduction. The changes that were associated with surgery were predominantly found at the ankle and hip, rather than at the knee.

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<![CDATA[Validation of the Fitbit Charge 2 compared to the ActiGraph GT3X+ in older adults with knee osteoarthritis in free-living conditions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b52a5d5eed0c4842bcd46

Objective

To evaluate physical activity (PA) and sedentary time in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) measured by the Fitbit Charge 2 (Fitbit) and a wrist-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ (AGW) compared to the hip-worn ActiGraph (AGH).

Design

We recruited a cohort of subjects with knee OA from rheumatology clinics. Subjects wore the AGH for four weeks, AGW for two weeks, and Fitbit for two weeks over a four-week study period. We collected accelerometer counts (ActiGraphs) and steps (ActiGraphs, Fitbit) and calculated time spent in sedentary, light, and moderate-to-vigorous activity. We used triaxial PA intensity count cut-points from the literature for ActiGraph and a stride length-based cadence algorithm to categorize Fitbit PA. We compared Fitbit wear times calculated from a step-based algorithm and a novel algorithm that incorporates steps and heart rate (HR).

Results

We enrolled 15 subjects (67% female, mean age 68 years). Relative to AGH, Fitbit, on average, overestimated steps by 39% and sedentary time by 37% and underestimated MVPA by 5 minutes. Relative to AGH, AGW overestimated steps 116%, underestimated sedentary time by 66%, and captured 281 additional MVPA minutes. The step-based wear time Fitbit algorithm captured 14% less wear time than the HR-based algorithm.

Conclusions

Fitbit overestimates steps and underestimates MVPA in knee OA subjects. Cut-offs validated for AGW should be developed to support the use of AGW for PA assessment. The HR-based Fitbit algorithm captured more wear time than the step-based algorithm. These data provide critical insight for researchers planning to use commercially-available accelerometers in pragmatic studies.

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<![CDATA[Balance control during stance - A comparison between horseback riding athletes and non-athletes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c63395dd5eed0c484ae6555

Horseback riding requires the ability to adapt to changes in balance conditions, to maintain equilibrium on the horse and to prevent falls. Postural adaptation involves specific sensorimotor processes integrating visual information and somesthesic information. The objective of this study was to examine this multisensorial integration on postural control, especially the use of visual and plantar information in static (stable) and dynamic (unstable) postures, among a group of expert horse rider women (n = 10) and a group of non-athlete women (n = 12). Postural control was evaluated through the center of pressure measured with a force platform on stable and unstable supports, with the eyes open and the eyes closed, and with the presence of foam on the support or not. Results showed that expert horse rider women had a better postural stability with unstable support in the mediolateral axis compared to non-athletes. Moreover, on the anteroposterior axis, expert horse riders were less visual dependent and more stable in the presence of foam. Results suggested that horseback riding could help developing particular proprioceptive abilities on standing posture as well as better postural muscle tone during particular bipodal dynamic perturbations. These outcomes provide new insights into horseback riding assets and methodological clues to assess the impact of sport practice.

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<![CDATA[Objective measures of rollator user stability and device loading during different walking scenarios]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b5283d5eed0c4842bca5f

Walking aids are widely used by older adults, however, alarmingly, their use has been linked to increased falls-risk, yet clinicians have no objective way of assessing user stability. This work aims to demonstrate the application of a novel methodology to investigate how the type of walking task, the amount of body weight supported by the device (i.e., device loading), and task performance strategy affect stability of rollator users. In this context, ten users performed six walking tasks with an instrumented rollator. The combined stability margin “SM” was calculated, which considers user and rollator as a combined system. A Friedman Test was used to investigate the effects of task on SM and a least-squares regression model was applied to investigate the relationship between device loading and SM. In addition, the effects of task performance strategy on SM were explored. As a result, it was found that: the minimum SM for straight line walking was higher than for more complex tasks (p<0.05); an increase in device loading was associated with an increase in SM (p<0.05); stepping up a kerb with at least 1 rollator wheel in ground contact at all times resulted in higher SM than lifting all four wheels simultaneously. Hence, we conclude that training should not be limited to straight line walking but should include various everyday tasks. Within person, SM informs on which tasks need practicing, and which strategy facilitates stability, thereby enabling person-specific guidance/training. The relevance of this work lies in an increase in walking aid users, and the costs arising from fall-related injuries.

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<![CDATA[Postural control in healthy adults: Determinants of trunk sway assessed with a chest-worn accelerometer in 12 quiet standing tasks]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c521837d5eed0c4847977f3

Many diseases and conditions decrease the ability to control balance. In clinical settings, there is therefore a major interest in the assessment of postural control. Trunk accelerometry is an easy, low-cost method used for balance testing and constitutes an alternative method to the posturography using force platforms. The objective was to assess the responsiveness of accelerometry in a battery of 12 quiet standing tasks. We evaluated the balance of 100 healthy adults with an accelerometer fixed onto the sternum. We used the average amplitude of acceleration as an indirect measure of postural sways. The tasks of increased difficulty were realized with or without vision. The battery of tasks was repeated four times on two different days to assess reliability. We analyzed the extent to which the task difficulty and the absence of vision affected the trunk sway. The influence of individual characteristics (age, height, mass, sex, and physical activity level) was also assessed. The reliability analysis revealed that four repetitions of the battery of tasks are needed to reach a high accuracy level (mean ICC = 0.85). The results showed that task difficulty had a very large effect on trunk sways and that the removal of vision further increased sways. Concerning the effects of individual characteristics, we observed that women tended to oscillate more than men did in tasks of low difficulty. Age and physical activity level also had significant effects, whereas height and mass did not. In conclusion, age, sex, and physical fitness are confounders that should be considered when assessing patients’ balance. A battery of simple postural tasks measured by upper-trunk accelerometry can be a useful method for simple balance evaluation in clinical settings.

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<![CDATA[Dynamic stretching alone can impair slower velocity isokinetic performance of young male handball players for at least 24 hours]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e66ed5eed0c484ef3164

There are many adult studies reporting static stretch (SS)-induced deficits and dynamic stretch (DS) performance improvements shortly after the intervention. However, there is only a single study examining stretch-induced performance changes with youth at 24 hours’ post-stretch. The objective of this study was to examine physiological responses of young trained athletes at 24-hours after experiencing SS or DS protocols. Eight young male, elite handball players (age: 16.1±5.1 years) were tested prior to-, 3-minutes and 24-hours following the three conditions (DS, SS, Control) in a randomized and counterbalanced order. Similar volumes of SS (2 repetitions of 75s for each leg) and DS (5 repetitions of 30s for each leg) involved one stretch each for the quadriceps and hamstrings. Tests included (i) two 4s maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) at 60° of knee flexion with 2-min rest, (ii) two maximal isokinetic contractions each at 60°/sec and 300°/sec with 1-min rest, and (iii) two drop jumps with 30-sec rest. To simulate a full warm-up, dynamic activity including 5 minutes of aerobic cycling (70 rpm; 1 kilopond), 4 submaximal isometric contractions and 4 drop jumps were instituted before the pre-tests and following the interventions. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs revealed that 1) both the SS and control conditions exhibited knee extensor 60°.s-1 (SS:-10.3%; p = 0.04, Control: -8.7%; p = 0.07) and 300°.s-1 (SS: -12.9%; p = 0.005, Control: -16.3%; p = 0.02) isokinetic deficits at post-test, 2) DS impaired knee flexor 60°.s-1 isokinetic work and power-related measures at post-test (Work: -10.1%; p = 0.0006; Power: -19.1%; p = 0.08) and at 24-hours’ post-test (Work: 9.9%; p = 0.023; Power: -9.6%; p = 0.01), 3) DS (12.07% and 10.47%) and SS (13.7% and 14.6%) enhanced knee flexor 300°.s-1 isokinetic force and power-related measures compared to control. In conclusion, testing-induced knee extensor isokinetic impairments were counterbalanced by DS, however the hip flexion DS could have produced minor muscle damage for at least 24-hours decreasing knee flexor forces and power at 60°.s-1.

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<![CDATA[Characteristics of trunk and lower limb alignment at maximum reach during the Star Excursion Balance Test in subjects with increased knee valgus during jump landing]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e6e7d5eed0c484ef425c

Background

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is often injured during sport. The Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) has been used to evaluate ankle and knee stability of the supporting leg while reaching in eight different directions with the non-stance leg. We hypothesized that the SEBT might be useful in categorising ACL injury risk. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between knee valgus alignment during single leg drop landing (SDL) and alignment of the trunk and lower limb during the SEBT.

Methods

A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to measure the trunk, hip and knee angles during SDL and the SEBT. Groupings were allocated based on 5 degrees of knee valgus angle during SDL. Independent t-test’s were used to identify differences in the trunk, hip and knee angles between the two groups.

Results

The knee valgus angles in the knee valgus group were greater than those in the control group in five directions of the SEBT (p < 0.05). In addition, the hip internal rotation angle in the knee valgus group was lower than that in the control group during two directions of the SEBT (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the knee flexion and trunk right rotation angles in the knee valgus group were lower than those in the control group in two directions of the SEBT (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

Decreases in hip internal rotation, knee flexion and trunk rotation to the supporting leg during the SEBT might be considered as risk factors for non-contact ACL injury.

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<![CDATA[Electromyographic comparison of the barbell deadlift using constant versus variable resistance in healthy, trained men]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c50c441d5eed0c4845e83ac

Variable, external resistance is proposed to increasingly augment the muscular stress throughout a dynamic movement. However, it is uncertain how different levels of variable resistance affect the activation in the deadlift. The aim of the study was to compare the electromyographic activity of the gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, vastus lateralis and erector spinae muscles during the barbell deadlift with free weights (FW) alone, with two (FW-2EB), and four elastic bands (FW-4EB) to deload some of the constant external resistance. Fifteen resistance-trained men participated in a cross-over design where resistance loadings were matched using two-repetition maximum loadings in the three different conditions. For the whole movement, both repetitions were analyzed. For the phase-specific analysis, the last repetition was divided into six parts, i.e. the lower, middle and upper phase in both the ascending and descending phase of the movement. The mean deloading contributions from FW-2EB and FW-4EB were 21% and 41%, respectively. In FW-4EB, the erector spinae was activated more in the whole movement (8%, ES = 0.31, p = 0.002) compared to FW-2EB. There was also a tendency towards higher activation in FW-4EB versus FW for the whole movement (5%, ES = 0.18, p = 0.072). There were no significant differences between the conditions in any of the other phases or muscles (p = 0.106–0.926). In summary, a high contribution from variable, external resistance seems to activate the back extensors more than a low contribution.

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<![CDATA[The prevalence of osteoarthritis: Higher risk after transfemoral amputation?—A database analysis with 1,569 amputees and matched controls]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c50c47bd5eed0c4845e87f8

Background

Several studies have shown that patients with a unilateral amputation have an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee of their sound leg. OBJECTIVE: The first objective was to investigate whether amputees are more frequently affected by gon-, cox- or polyarthritis as well as back pain or spinal disorders. We hypothesized that mobile and active transfemoral amputees more often experience OA and spinal disorders than non-amputees. The second objective was to compare the mean age of the patients with OA.

Patients

Patients with a unilateral transfemoral amputation (n = 1,569) and five abled-body control groups (each n = 1,569) matched in terms of age and gender resulting in total of 9,414 participants.

Methods

Groups were analyzed regarding the prevalence of six selected diagnoses regarding musculoskeletal disorders.

Results

A significantly decreased prevalence of OA and specific disorders of the spine in transfemoral amputees compared to a control group was found. The amputees with OA are significantly younger than patients with OA in the control group.

Conclusion

The results from the presented study contradict previously published literature. Apparently circumstances of life play an important role, like physical work and strenuous activities which are likely to be underrepresented in the amputee group. The results of the study need to be used cautiously due to the major limitation of the study which is the lack of detail in individual patients caused by the methodology.

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<![CDATA[Evaluation of functional methods of joint centre determination for quasi-planar movement]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c605a9ed5eed0c4847cd32a

Functional methods identify joint centres as the centre of rotation (CoR) of two adjacent movements during an ad-hoc movement. The methods have been used for functionally determining hip joint centre in gait analysis and have revealed advantages compared to predictive regression techniques. However, the current implementation of functional methods hinders its application in clinical use when subjects have difficulties performing multi-plane movements over the required range. In this study, we systematically investigated whether functional methods can be used to localise the CoR during a quasi-planar movement. The effects of the following factors were analysed: the algorithms, the range and speed of the movement, marker cluster location, marker cluster size and distance to the joint centre. A mechanical linkage was used in our study to isolate the factors of interest and give insight to variation in implementation of functional methods. Our results showed the algorithms and cluster locations significantly affected the estimate results. For all algorithms, a significantly positive relationship between CoR errors and the distance of proximal cluster coordinate location to the joint centre along the medial-lateral direction was observed while the distal marker clusters were best located as close as possible to the joint centre. By optimising the analytical and experimental factors, the transformation algorithms achieved a root mean square error (RMSE) of 5.3 mm while the sphere fitting methods yielded the best estimation with an RMSE of 2.6 mm. The transformation algorithms performed better in presence of random noise and simulated soft tissue artefacts.

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