ResearchPad - philosophical-exploration https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Love of Neighbor During a Pandemic: Navigating the Competing Goods of Religious Gatherings and Physical Health]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7939 In light of the present pandemic, many religious communities have been asked to suspend their services and meetings. From the perspective of these communities, this comes at considerable cost to the spiritual good that these religious services bring about. Empirical evidence also indicates that the suspension of these services will have costs concerning physical and mental health as well. However, in the case of a pandemic, because it is an infectious disease that is the concern, love of neighbor arguably does entail the suspension of services for the sake of the preservation of life for others. Religious communities and individuals can, and have, found ways to partially offset the losses from not being able to meet. These have included increased personal and family prayer and devotion, video-streaming of services, and online prayer and discussion meetings. While none of these fully compensates for the loss of in-person meetings, the sacrifice entailed may itself be seen as a means to greater love of God and love of neighbor.

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<![CDATA[Religious Values in Clinical Practice are Here to Stay]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nb3e7de5e-35df-42f2-ad76-eabb5c5e9290

Research to date has shown that health professionals often practice according to personal values, including values based on faith, and that these values impact medicine in multiple ways. While some influence of personal values are inevitable, awareness of values is important so as to sustain beneficial practice without conflicting with the values of the patient. Detecting when own personal values, whether based on a theistic or atheistic worldview, are at work, is a daily challenge in clinical practice. Simultaneously ethical guidelines of tone-setting medical associations like American Medical Association, the British General Medical Council and Australian Medical Association have been updated to encompass physicians’ right to practice medicine in accord with deeply held beliefs. Framed by this context, we discuss the concept of value-neutrality and value-based medical practice of physicians from both a cultural and ethical perspective, and reach the conclusion that the concept of a completely value-neutral physician, free from influence of personal values and filtering out value-laden information when talking to patients, is simply an unrealistic ideal in light of existing evidence. Still we have no reason to suspect that personal values, whether religious, spiritual, atheistic or agnostic, should hinder physicians from delivering professional and patient-centered care.

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