ResearchPad - polymers https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Atco, a yeast mitochondrial complex of Atp9 and Cox6, is an assembly intermediate of the ATP synthase]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14724 Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos) is the process by which the ATP synthase conserves the energy released during the oxidation of different nutrients as ATP. The yeast ATP synthase consists of three assembly modules, one of which is a ring consisting of 10 copies of the Atp9 subunit. We previously reported the existence in yeast mitochondria of high molecular weight complexes composed of mitochondrially encoded Atp9 and of Cox6, an imported structural subunit of cytochrome oxidase (COX). Pulse-chase experiments indicated a correlation between the loss of newly translated Atp9 complexed to Cox6 and an increase of newly formed Atp9 ring, but did not exclude the possibility of an alternate source of Atp9 for ring formation. Here we have extended studies on the functions and structure of this complex, referred to as Atco. We show that Atco is the exclusive source of Atp9 for the ATP synthase assembly. Pulse-chase experiments show that newly translated Atp9, present in Atco, is converted to a ring, which is incorporated into the ATP synthase with kinetics characteristic of a precursor-product relationship. Even though Atco does not contain the ring form of Atp9, cross-linking experiments indicate that it is oligomeric and that the inter-subunit interactions are similar to those of the bona fide ring. We propose that, by providing Atp9 for biogenesis of ATP synthase, Atco complexes free Cox6 for assembly of COX. This suggests that Atco complexes may play a role in coordinating assembly and maintaining proper stoichiometry of the two oxphos enzymes

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<![CDATA[Structure and functional analysis of the <i>Legionella pneumophila</i> chitinase ChiA reveals a novel mechanism of metal-dependent mucin degradation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14652 A broad range of organisms produce chitinase enzymes that digest chitin, the second most abundant carbohydrate on earth. Chitinases have also been identified that are important factors in major bacterial diseases but it is unclear how. Legionella pneumophila causes Legionnaires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia, and its chitinase ChiA is essential for the survival of L. pneumophila during infection of the lung. Using structural biology and microbiology methods we have determined that ChiA can associate with the L. pneumophila surface and along with other outer membrane proteins can also bind mammalian mucins. We also identified a new and unique enzyme mechanism where L. pneumophila ChiA can hydrolyse the peptide bonds of mucin-like proteins. Mucins are major components of the mucous that lines the surface of the respiratory, digestive, and urogenital tracts and acts as a first line of defence during infection. This is the first mechanistic understanding of how a chitinase can promote disease through additional peptidase activity and suggests that L. pneumophila ChiA can modulate host immune responses and disperse host mucosa during infection.

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<![CDATA[A new neuropeptide insect parathyroid hormone iPTH in the red flour beetle <i>Tribolium castaneum</i>]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14647 Vertebrate parathyroid hormone (PTH) and its receptors have been extensively studied with respect to their function in bone remodeling and calcium metabolism. Insect parathyroid hormone receptors (iPTHRs) have been previously described as counterparts of vertebrate PTHRs, however, they are still orphan receptors for which the authentic ligands and biological functions remain unknown. We describe an insect form of parathyroid hormone (iPTH) by analyzing its interactions with iPTHRs. Identification of this new insect peptidergic system proved that the PTH system is an ancestral signaling system dating back to the evolutionary time before the divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes. We also investigated the functions of the iPTH system in a model beetle Tribolium castaneum by using RNA interference. RNA interference of iPTHR resulted in defects in wing exoskeleton maturation and fecundity. Based on the differential gene expression patterns and the phenotype induced by RNAi, we propose that the iPTH system is likely involved in the regulation of exoskeletal cuticle formation and fecundity in insects.

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<![CDATA[Identification and detection of a novel point mutation in the Chitin Synthase gene of <i>Culex pipiens</i> associated with diflubenzuron resistance]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14502 Diflubenzuron is one of the main larvicides used for the control of the West Nile Virus vector Culex pipiens in the Mediterranean. However, the efficiency of control is now under threat due to the selection of insecticide resistance. Two point mutations were previously identified at the Chitin synthase and shown to confer low and high levels of resistance and a diagnostic was developed to monitor the trait. This study reports the identification of a third mutation associated with high levels of diflubenzuron resistance in Italy. This mutation was also detected in France, whereas no resistance mutations were found in Cx. pipiens mosquitoes sampled from Greece, Portugal and Israel. The findings are of major concern for mosquito control programs in S. Europe, which rely on the use of a limited number of larvicides.

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<![CDATA[Mechanical characterization of PVA hydrogels’ rate-dependent response using multi-axial loading]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13820 The time-dependent properties of rubber-like synthesized and biological materials are crucial for their applications. Currently, this behavior is mainly measured using axial tensile test, compression test, or indentation. Limited studies performed on using multi-axial loading measurements of time-dependent material behavior exist in the literature. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the viscoelastic response of rubber-like materials under multi-axial loading using cavity expansion and relaxation tests. The tests were performed on PVA hydrogel specimens. Three hyperelasitc models and one term Prony series were used to characterize the viscoelastic response of the hydrogels. Finite element (FE) simulations were performed to verify the validity of the calibrated material coefficients by reproducing the experimental results. The excellent agreement between the experimental, analytical and numerical data proves the capability of the cavity expansion technique to measure the time-dependent behavior of viscoelastic materials.

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<![CDATA[Analysis and modeling of coolants and coolers for specimen transportation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N4e3aeb5c-7b13-42da-a06e-637c738940f8

Maintaining cold chain while transporting medical supplies and samples is difficult in remote settings. Failure to maintain temperature requirements can lead to degraded sample quality and inaccuracies in sample analysis. We performed a systematic analysis on different types of transport coolers (polystyrene foam, injection-molded, and rotational molded) and transport coolants (ice, cold packs, frozen water bottles) frequently in use in many countries. Polystyrene foam coolers stayed below our temperature threshold (6°C) longer than almost all other types of coolers, but were not durable. Injection-molded coolers were durable, but warmed to 6°C the quickest. Rotational molded coolers were able to keep temperatures below our threshold for 24 hours longer than injection molded coolers and were highly durable. Coolant systems were evaluated in terms of cost and their ability to maintain cold temperatures. Long lasting commercial cold packs were found to be less cost effective and were below freezing for the majority of the testing period. Frozen plastic water bottles were found to be a reusable and economical choice for coolant and were only below freezing briefly. Finally, we modeled the coolers performance at maintaining internal temperatures below 6°C and built a highly accurate linear model to predict how long a cooler will remain below 6°C. We believe this data may be useful in the planning and design of specimen transportation systems in the field, particularly in remote or resource limited settings.

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<![CDATA[Polymer-fiber-coupled field-effect sensors for label-free deep brain recordings]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N12f161cb-ce31-436b-989e-fa44b0a6dffa

Electrical recording permits direct readout of neural activity but offers limited ability to correlate it to the network topography. On the other hand, optical imaging reveals the architecture of neural circuits, but relies on bulky optics and fluorescent reporters whose signals are attenuated by the brain tissue. Here we introduce implantable devices to record brain activities based on the field effect, which can be further extended with capability of label-free electrophysiological mapping. Such devices reply on light-addressable potentiometric sensors (LAPS) coupled to polymer fibers with integrated electrodes and optical waveguide bundles. The LAPS utilizes the field effect to convert electrophysiological activity into regional carrier redistribution, and the neural activity is read out in a spatially resolved manner as a photocurrent induced by a modulated light beam. Spatially resolved photocurrent recordings were achieved by illuminating different pixels within the fiber bundles. These devices were applied to record local field potentials in the mouse hippocampus. In conjunction with the raster-scanning via the single modulated beam, this technology may enable fast label-free imaging of neural activity in deep brain regions.

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<![CDATA[Cellulose-Derived Functional Polyacetal by Cationic Ring-Opening Polymerization of Levoglucosenyl Methyl Ether]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nc977c789-f713-443b-a2c7-ce3c389d2fe3

Abstract

The unsaturated bicyclic acetal levoglucosenyl methyl ether was readily obtained from sustainable feedstock (cellulose) and polymerized by cationic ring‐opening polymerization to produce a semicrystalline thermoplastic unsaturated polyacetal with relatively high apparent molar mass (up to ca. 36 kg mol−1) and decent dispersity (ca. 1.4). The double bonds along the chain can undergo hydrogenation and thiol–ene reactions as well as crosslinking, thus making this polyacetal potentially interesting as a reactive functional material.

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<![CDATA[A specialized MreB-dependent cell wall biosynthetic complex mediates the formation of stalk-specific peptidoglycan in Caulobacter crescentus]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5df35ad5eed0c48458119b

Many bacteria have complex cell shapes, but the mechanisms producing their distinctive morphologies are still poorly understood. Caulobacter crescentus, for instance, exhibits a stalk-like extension that carries an adhesive holdfast mediating surface attachment. This structure forms through zonal peptidoglycan biosynthesis at the old cell pole and elongates extensively under phosphate-limiting conditions. We analyzed the composition of cell body and stalk peptidoglycan and identified significant differences in the nature and proportion of peptide crosslinks, indicating that the stalk represents a distinct subcellular domain with specific mechanical properties. To identify factors that participate in stalk formation, we systematically inactivated and localized predicted components of the cell wall biosynthetic machinery of C. crescentus. Our results show that the biosynthesis of stalk peptidoglycan involves a dedicated peptidoglycan biosynthetic complex that combines specific components of the divisome and elongasome, suggesting that the repurposing of preexisting machinery provides a straightforward means to evolve new morphological traits.

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<![CDATA[Temporal evolution and pathway models of poly(ethylene-terephthalate) degradation under multi-factor accelerated weathering exposures]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c70673ad5eed0c4847c6c71

Photolytic and hydrolytic degradation of poly(ethylene-terephthalate) (PET) polymers with different stabilizers were performed under multiple accelerated weathering exposures and changes in the polymers were monitored by various evaluation techniques. Yellowing was caused by photolytic degradation and haze formation was induced by combined effects of photolytic and hydrolytic degradation. The formation of light absorbing chromophores and bleaching of the UV stabilizer additive were recorded through optical spectroscopy. Chain scission and crystallization were found to be common mechanisms under both photolytic and hydrolytic conditions, based on the infrared absorption of the carbonyl (C = O) band and the trans ethylene glycol unit, respectively. The degradation mechanisms determined from these evaluations were then used to construct a set of degradation pathway network models using the network structural equation modeling (netSEM) approach. This method captured the temporal evolution of degradation by assessing statistically significant relationships between applied stressors, mechanistic variables, and performance level responses. Quantitative pathway equations provided the contributions from mechanistic variables to the response changes.

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<![CDATA[Synthesis and characterizations of o-nitrochitosan based biopolymer electrolyte for electrochemical devices]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c706761d5eed0c4847c6f87

For the past decade, much attention was focused on polysaccharide natural resources for various purposes. Throughout the works, several efforts were reported to prepare new function of chitosan by chemical modifications for renewable energy, such as fuel cell application. This paper focuses on synthesis of the chitosan derivative, namely, O-nitrochitosan which was synthesized at various compositions of sodium hydroxide and reacted with nitric acid fume. Its potential as biopolymer electrolytes was studied. The substitution of nitro group was analyzed by using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infra-Red (ATR-FTIR) analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Elemental Analysis (CHNS). The structure was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and its thermal properties were examined by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Whereas, the ionic conductivity of the samples was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). From the IR spectrum results, the nitro group peaks of O-nitrochitosan, positioned at 1646 and 1355 cm-1, were clearly seen for all pH media. At pH 6, O-nitrochitosan exhibited the highest degree of substitution at 0.74 when analyzed by CHNS analysis and NMR further proved that C-6 of glucosamine ring was shifted to the higher field. However, the thermal stability and glass transition temperatures were decreased with acidic condition. The highest ionic conductivity of O-nitrochitosan was obtained at ~10−6 cm-1. Overall, the electrochemical property of new O-nitrochitosan showed a good improvement as compared to chitosan and other chitosan derivatives. Hence, O-nitrochitosan is a promising biopolymer electrolyte and has the potential to be applied in electrochemical devices.

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<![CDATA[Physical assessment, spectroscopic and chemometric analysis of starch-based foils with selected functional additives]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dc9cdd5eed0c48452a1f6

The paper presents the results of studies related to the impact of functional additives in the form of polylactide (PLA), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and keratin hydrolysate (K) on the physical characteristics of biopolymer foils. TPS granulate was obtained using a TS-45 single-screw extruder with L/D = 16. Foil was produced with the use of an L/D = 36 extruder with film-blowing section. The impact of the quantity and type of the functional additives on the processing efficiency and energy consumption of granulate extrusion, as well as the physical characteristics of the foil produced: thickness, basis weight, and colour were determined. By measuring the FTIR spectra it was determined the type and origin of the respective functional groups. It was observed that foils produced from granulates with the addition of 3% PVA were characterised by the lowest thickness and basis weight. Addition of 2 and 3% of PLA increased thickness and basis weight of starch-based foils significantly. Increasing the content of keratin in SG/K samples resulted in a decrease of brightness and intensify the yellow tint of foils, especially when 2 and 3% of keratin was used. In terms of the other samples, it was observed that the colour remained almost unchanged irrespective of the percentage content of the additive used. Infrared analyses conducted on foil containing PVA, PLA, and K revealed a change in spectra intensity in the frequency range associated with–OH groups originating from the forming free, intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Based on an analysis of the respective bands within the IR range it was also concluded that considerable structural changes took place with respect to the glycosidic bonds of starch itself. The application of the mentioned additives had a significant structural impact on the produced starch-based foils. Furthermore, the conducted UV-Vis analyses revealed a substantial increase in absorbance and a related reduction of the permeability (colour change) of the obtained materials in the range of ultraviolet and visible light.

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<![CDATA[Microplastics in Mediterranean Sea: A protocol to robustly assess contamination characteristics]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6b267ad5eed0c484289b52

The study of microplastic pollution involves multidisciplinary analyses on a large number of microplastics. Therefore, providing an overview of plastic pollution is time consuming and, despite high throughput analyses, remains a major challenge. The objective of this study is to propose a protocol to determine how many microplastics must be analyzed to give a representative view of the particle size distribution and chemical nature, and calculate the associated margin error. Based on microplastic data from Tara Mediterranean campaign, this approach is explained through different examples. In this particular case, the results show that only 3% of the collected microplastics need to be analyzed to give a precise view on the scale of the North West Mediterranean Basin (error <5%), and 17.7% to give an overview manta per manta (error <10%). This approach could be an important practical contribution to microplastic studies.

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<![CDATA[Isolated diastolic potentials as predictors of success in ablation of right ventricular outflow tract idiopathic premature ventricular contractions]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c648cdbd5eed0c484c8196e

Background and aims

Discrete potentials, low voltage and fragmented electrograms, have been previously reported at ablation site, in patients with premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) originating in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT). The aim of this study was to review the electrograms at ablation site and assess the presence of diastolic potentials and their association with success.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed the electrograms obtained at the radiofrequency (RF) delivery sites of 48 patients subjected to ablation of RVOT frequent PVCs. We assessed the duration and amplitude of local electrogram, local activation time, and presence of diastolic potentials and fragmented electrograms.

Results

We reviewed 134 electrograms, median 2 (1–4) per patient. Success was achieved in 40 patients (83%). At successful sites the local activation time was earlier– 54 (-35 to -77) ms vs -26 (-12 to -35) ms, p<0.0001; the local electrogram had lower amplitude 1 (0.45–1.15) vs 1.5 (0.5–2.1) mV, p = 0.006, and longer duration 106 (80–154) vs 74 (60–90) ms, p<0.0001. Diastolic potentials and fragmented electrograms were more frequently present, respectively 76% vs 9%, p <0.0001 and 54% vs 11%, p<0.0001. In univariable analysis these variables were all associated with success. In multivariable analysis only the presence of diastolic potentials [OR 15.5 (95% CI: 3.92–61.2; p<0.0001)], and the value of local activation time [OR 1.11 (95% CI: 1.049–1.172 p<0.0001)], were significantly associated with success.

Conclusion

In this group of patients the presence of diastolic potentials at the ablation site was associated with success.

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<![CDATA[A comparison of emulsion stability for different OSA-modified waxy maize emulsifiers: Granules, dissolved starch, and non-solvent precipitates]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c648d0bd5eed0c484c81df8

This work investigates the stability of emulsions prepared by using octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-modified waxy maize starch in the form of granules, dissolved starch, and non-solvent precipitated starch as Pickering emulsion stabilisers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different forms of starches on the stability of emulsion using light microscopy, light scattering, and static multiple light scattering. All starch samples were hydrophobically modified with 3% (w/w) n-octenyl succinyl anhydride (OSA). Starch polymer solutions were prepared by dissolving OSA- modified starch in water in an autoclave at 140°C. Non-solvent precipitates were obtained through ethanol precipitation of dissolved waxy maize. The stability of the oil/water emulsions were different for the three forms of starches used. The granule-based emulsions were unstable, with only a small proportion of the granules adsorbed onto oil droplets, as viewed under a light microscope. The emulsions were observed to cream after 2 hours. The dissolved starch and non-solvent precipitate-based emulsions were stable towards creaming for months, and they had almost 100% emulsifying index (EI = 1) by visual observation and EI ~ 0.9 by multiple light scattering measurements. The results from light microscopy and multiple light scattering measurements indicated the occurrence of coalescence for all three types of emulsions. The coalescence was fastest within days for the granule stabilised system while it was slower both for the dissolved starch and non-solvent precipitate-based emulsions. The latter demonstrated the least degree of coalescence over time. Thus, it was concluded that differences in starch particle size and molecular structure influenced the emulsion droplet size and stability. A decreased particle size correlates to a decrease in droplet size, thus increasing stabilisation against creaming. However, stability towards coalescence was low for the large granules but was best for the non-solvent precipitate starch indicating that there is a window of optimal particle size for stability. Thus, best emulsifying properties were obtained with the non-solvent precipitates (~ 120 nm particle size) where the emulsions remained stable after one year of storage. In conclusion, this study illustrated the potentiality of non-solvent precipitated starch as emulsion stabilizers.

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<![CDATA[Spores of puffball fungus Lycoperdon pyriforme as a reference standard of stable monodisperse aerosol for calibration of optical instruments]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b528ad5eed0c4842bcb24

Advanced air quality control requires real-time monitoring of particulate matter size and concentration, which can only be done using optical instruments. However, such techniques need regular calibration with reference samples. In this study, we suggest that puffball fungus (Lycoperdon pyriforme) spores can be utilized as a reference standard having a monodisperse size distribution. We compare the Lycoperdon pyriforme spores with the other commonly used reference samples, such as Al2O3 powder and polystyrene latex (PSL) microspheres. Here we demonstrate that the puffball spores do not coagulate and, thus, maintain the same particle size in the aerosol state for at least 15 minutes, which is enough for instrument calibration. Moreover, the puffball mushrooms can be stored for several years and no agglomeration of the spores occurs. They are also much cheaper than other calibration samples and no additional devices are needed for aerosol generation since the fungal fruiting body acts as an atomizer itself. The aforementioned features make the fungal spores a highly promising substance for calibration and validation of particle size analyzers, which outperforms the existing, artificially produced particles for aerosol sampling. Furthermore, the L. pyriforme spores are convenient for basic research and development of new optical measurement techniques, taking into account their uniform particle size and absent coagulation in the aerosol.

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<![CDATA[Optimization of Ralstonia solanacearum cell growth using a central composite rotational design for the P(3HB) production: Effect of agitation and aeration]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c59fecdd5eed0c484135550

The intracellular accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) normally occurs after cell growth, during the second fermentation stage and under nutrient-limited conditions in the presence of a carbon excess. However, some microorganisms are able to accumulate PHAs as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] during the first fermentation stage, the cell growth phase, without nutrient limitation, once they have been reported to utilize type II metabolism during the polymer accumulation phase. This study evaluated the effect of aeration and agitation on cell growth and P(3HB) accumulation in Ralstonia solanacearum RS, performed in a bioreactor for 24h at 32°C. A 22 central composite rotational design (CCRD) was used, with agitation (150 to 250 rpm) and aeration (0.3 to 1 vvm) as independent variables and optical density (OD600nm), dry cell weight (DCW), and P(3HB) yield as dependent variables. A significant polymer accumulation, until 70% of P(3HB), was observed, proving that R. solanacearum RS exhibited metabolism type II, regardless of the aeration process. The best results were obtained for 1 vvm and 250 rpm (+1, +1), with values of OD600nm (18.04) and DCW (4.82 g.L-1).

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<![CDATA[Robotic hand illusion with tactile feedback: Unravelling the relative contribution of visuotactile and visuomotor input to the representation of body parts in space]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c521842d5eed0c484797949

The rubber hand illusion describes a phenomenon in which participants experience a rubber hand as being part of their body by the synchronous application of visuotactile stimulation to the real and the artificial limb. In the recently introduced robotic hand illusion (RobHI), a robotic hand is incorporated into one’s body representation due to the integration of synchronous visuomotor information. However, there are no setups so far that combine visuotactile and visuomotor feedback, which is expected to unravel mechanisms that cannot be detected in experimental designs applying this information in isolation. We developed a robotic hand, controlled by a sensor glove and equipped with pressure sensors, and varied systematically and separately the synchrony for motor feedback (MF) and tactile feedback (TF). In Experiment 1, we implemented a ball-grasping task and assessed the perceived proprioceptive drift of one’s own hand as a behavioral measure of the spatial calibration of body coordinates as well as explicit embodiment experiences by a questionnaire. Results revealed significant main effects of both MF and TF for proprioceptive drift data, but we only observed main effects for MF on perceived embodiment. Furthermore, for the proprioceptive drift we found that synchronous feedback in one factor compensates for asynchronous feedback in the other. In Experiment 2, including a new sample of naïve participants, we further explored this finding by adding unimodal conditions, in which we manipulated the presence or absence of MF and/or TF. These findings replicated the results from Experiment 1 and we further found evidence for a supper-additive multisensory effect on spatial body representation caused by the presence of both factors. Results on conscious body perception were less consistent across both experiments. The findings indicate that sensory and motor input equally contribute to the representation of spatial body coordinates which for their part are subject to multisensory enhancing effects. The results outline the potential of human-in-the-loop approaches and might have important implications for clinical applications such as for the future design of robotic prostheses.

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<![CDATA[The peptidoglycan and biofilm matrix of Staphylococcus epidermidis undergo structural changes when exposed to human platelets]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e669d5eed0c484ef3082

Staphylococcus epidermidis is a bacterium frequently isolated from contaminated platelet concentrates (PCs), a blood product used to treat bleeding disorders in transfusion patients. PCs offer an accidental niche for colonization of S. epidermidis by forming biofilms and thus avoiding clearance by immune factors present in this milieu. Using biochemical and microscopy techniques, we investigated the structural changes of the peptidoglycan (PG) and the biofilm matrix of S. epidermidis biofilms formed in whole-blood derived PCs compared to biofilms grown in glucose-supplemented trypticase soy broth (TSBg). Both, the PG and the biofilm matrix are primary mechanisms of defense against environmental stress. Here we show that in PCs, the S. epidermidis biofilm matrix is mainly of a proteinaceous nature with extracellular DNA, in contrast to the predominant polysaccharide nature of the biofilm matrix formed in TSBg cultures. PG profile studies demonstrated that the PG of biofilm cells remodels during PC storage displaying fewer muropeptides variants than those observed in TSBg. The PG muropeptides contain two chemical modifications (amidation and O-acetylation) previously associated with resistance to antimicrobial agents by other staphylococci. Our study highlights two key structural features of S. epidermidis that are remodeled when exposed to human platelets and could be used as targets to reduce septic transfusions events.

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<![CDATA[Comparisons of early vascular reactions in biodegradable and durable polymer-based drug-eluting stents in the porcine coronary artery]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c40f823d5eed0c48438714e

Current drug-eluting stents have abluminal polymer coating; however, thrombus formation in these compared with that in uniformly coated stents remains controversial. We evaluated thrombus formation and early endothelialization after using abluminal biodegradable polymer-coated sirolimus- (BP-SES), and everolimus-eluting stents (BP-EES) versus a durable polymer-coated everolimus-eluting stent (DP-EES) in an in vivo setting. BP-SES, BP-EES, and DP-EES (n = 6 each) were implanted in coronary arteries of 12 mini-pigs that were then sacrificed after 7 and 10 days. Stents were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and a combined Verhoeff and Masson trichrome stain. Areas of fibrin deposition were digitally detected and measured with off-line morphometric software. Stents were investigated for re-endothelialization by transmission electron microscopy. At 7 days, histological analysis revealed the lowest area of fibrin deposition in BP-SES (BP-SES vs. BP-EES vs. DP-EES; 0.10 ± 0.06 mm2 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07 mm2 vs. 0.19 ± 0.06 mm2, p = 0.0004). At 10 days, the area of fibrin deposition was significantly greater in DP-EES (0.13 ± 0.04 mm2 vs. 0.14 ± 0.05 mm2 vs. 0.19 ± 0.08 mm2, p = 0.007). Endothelial cells in BP-SES demonstrated a significantly greater number of tight junctions than those in DP-EES according to by transmission electron microscopy for both days (p<0.05). Various parameters, including an inflammatory reaction and neointimal formation, were comparable among the groups at 7 and 10 days. An abluminal biodegradable polymer-coated SES showed the least fibrin deposition and greatest endothelial cell recovery at an early stage following implantation in the coronary arteries of mini-pigs.

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