ResearchPad - practical-approach https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Photodynamic Therapy for Chorioretinal Diseases: A Practical Approach]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N017cd54b-41a5-431d-9797-a805c33704fa Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using verteporfin (Visudyne®; Bausch + Lomb) is a treatment that is widely used to elicit cell and tissue death. In ophthalmology, PDT targets choroidal vascular abnormalities and induces selective occlusion of vessels. PDT was originally used in combination with full-dose verteporfin to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Since the introduction of treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitors, the clinical targets of PDT have shifted to other chorioretinal conditions, such as central serous chorioretinopathy, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy, and choroidal hemangioma. In recent years, clinical studies have facilitated the optimization of treatment outcomes through changes in protocols, including the introduction of reduced treatment settings, such as PDT with half-dose verteporfin and half-fluence PDT. Here, we review PDT and its use for chorioretinal diseases from a practical perspective.

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<![CDATA[Recognising Skin Cancer in Primary Care]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N548ad1d8-8286-4e50-b155-a09c607b6379

Skin cancer, including melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, has one of the highest global incidences of any form of cancer. In 2016 more than 16,000 people were diagnosed with melanoma in the UK. Over the last decade the incidence of melanoma has increased by 50% in the UK, and about one in ten melanomas are diagnosed at a late stage. Among the keratinocyte carcinomas (previously known as non-melanoma skin cancers), basal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer amongst Caucasian populations. The main risk factor for all skin cancer is exposure to ultraviolet radiation—more than 80% are considered preventable. Primary care clinicians have a vital role to play in detecting and managing patients with skin lesions suspected to be skin cancer, as timely diagnosis and treatment can improve patient outcomes, particularly for melanoma. However, detecting skin cancer can be challenging, as common non-malignant skin lesions such as seborrhoeic keratoses share features with less common skin cancers. Given that more than 80% of skin cancers are attributed to ultraviolet (UV) exposure, primary care clinicians can also play an important role in skin cancer prevention. This article is one of a series discussing cancer prevention and detection in primary care. Here we focus on the most common types of skin cancer: melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. We describe the main risk factors and prevention advice. We summarise key guidance on the symptoms and signs of skin cancers and their management, including their initial assessment and referral. In addition, we review emerging technologies and diagnostic aids which may become available for use in primary care in the near future, to aid the triage of suspicious skin lesions.

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<![CDATA[Improving Type 2 Diabetes Management in General Practice Using a Second-Generation Basal Insulin Analogue Insulin Glargine 300 U/mL: A  Practical Guide]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Ne724e8aa-5945-4a0b-b1d5-5da3b3878039

Type 2 diabetes management can be improved by the use of second-generation basal insulin analogues as the first choice on commencement of insulin, in this instance focussing on insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300). The clinical application of the use of Gla-300 include advantages such as less intra- and interpatient variability in glucose control resulting in rather less hypoglycaemia, longer duration of action and greater flexibility in the timing of administration thus suiting a wide range of patient presentations.

Funding: Sanofi Australia.

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