ResearchPad - protein-kinase-signaling-cascade https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Genome-wide identification of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade and expression profiling of <i>CmMAPKs</i> in melon (<i>Cucumis melo</i> L.)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14577 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a form of serine/threonine protein kinase that activated by extracellular stimulation acting through the MAPK cascade (MAPKKK-MAPKK-MAPK). The MAPK cascade gene family, an important family of protein kinases, plays a vital role in responding to various stresses and hormone signal transduction processes in plants. In this study, we identified 14 CmMAPKs, 6 CmMAPKKs and 64 CmMAPKKKs in melon genome. Based on structural characteristics and a comparison of phylogenetic relationships of MAPK gene families from Arabidopsis, cucumber and watermelon, CmMAPKs and CmMAPKKs were categorized into 4 groups, and CmMAPKKKs were categorized into 3 groups. Furthermore, chromosome location revealed an unevenly distribution on chromosomes of MAPK cascade genes in melon, respectively. Eventually, qRT-PCR analysis showed that all 14 CmMAPKs had different expression patterns under drought, salt, salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA), red light (RL), and Podosphaera xanthii (P. xanthii) treatments. Overall, the expression levels of CmMAPK3 and CmMAPK7 under different treatments were higher than those in control. Our study provides an important basis for future functional verification of MAPK genes in regulating responses to stress and signal substance in melon.

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<![CDATA[Role of MPK4 in pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered alternative splicing in Arabidopsis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N4009e20f-330a-49f1-8a3f-309ba227a41c

Alternative splicing (AS) of pre-mRNAs in plants is an important mechanism of gene regulation in environmental stress tolerance but plant signals involved are essentially unknown. Pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinases and the majority of PTI defense genes are regulated by MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6. These responses have been mainly analyzed at the transcriptional level, however many splicing factors are direct targets of MAPKs. Here, we studied alternative splicing induced by the PAMP flagellin in Arabidopsis. We identified 506 PAMP-induced differentially alternatively spliced (DAS) genes. Importantly, of the 506 PAMP-induced DAS genes, only 89 overlap with the set of 1950 PAMP-induced differentially expressed genes (DEG), indicating that transcriptome analysis does not identify most DAS events. Global DAS analysis of mpk3, mpk4, and mpk6 mutants in the absence of PAMP treatment showed no major splicing changes. However, in contrast to MPK3 and MPK6, MPK4 was found to be a key regulator of PAMP-induced DAS events as the AS of a number of splicing factors and immunity-related protein kinases is affected, such as the calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK28, the cysteine-rich receptor like kinases CRK13 and CRK29 or the FLS2 co-receptor SERK4/BKK1. Although MPK4 is guarded by SUMM2 and consequently, the mpk4 dwarf and DEG phenotypes are suppressed in mpk4 summ2 mutants, MPK4-dependent DAS is not suppressed by SUMM2, supporting the notion that PAMP-triggered MPK4 activation mediates regulation of alternative splicing.

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<![CDATA[Exposure of Candida albicans β (1,3)-glucan is promoted by activation of the Cek1 pathway]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5ca280d5eed0c48441e4da

Candida albicans is among the most common causes of human fungal infections and is an important source of mortality. C. albicans is able to diminish its detection by innate immune cells through masking of β (1,3)-glucan in the inner cell wall with an outer layer of heavily glycosylated mannoproteins (mannan). However, mutations or drugs that disrupt the cell wall can lead to exposure of β (1,3)-glucan (unmasking) and enhanced detection by innate immune cells through receptors like Dectin-1, the C-type signaling lectin. Previously, our lab showed that the pathway for synthesizing the phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) plays a role in β (1,3)-glucan masking. The homozygous PS synthase knockout mutant, cho1Δ/Δ, exhibits increased exposure of β (1,3)-glucan. Several Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways and their upstream Rho-type small GTPases are important for regulating cell wall biogenesis and remodeling. In the cho1Δ/Δ mutant, both the Cek1 and Mkc1 MAPKs are constitutively activated, and they act downstream of the small GTPases Cdc42 and Rho1, respectively. In addition, Cdc42 activity is up-regulated in cho1Δ/Δ. Thus, it was hypothesized that activation of Cdc42 or Rho1 and their downstream kinases cause unmasking. Disruption of MKC1 does not decrease unmasking in cho1Δ/Δ, and hyperactivation of Rho1 in wild-type cells increases unmasking and activation of both Cek1 and Mkc1. Moreover, independent hyperactivation of the MAP kinase kinase kinase Ste11 in wild-type cells leads to Cek1 activation and increased β (1,3)-glucan exposure. Thus, upregulation of the Cek1 MAPK pathway causes unmasking, and may be responsible for unmasking in cho1Δ/Δ.

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<![CDATA[Interaction between the transmembrane domains of Sho1 and Opy2 enhances the signaling efficiency of the Hog1 MAP kinase cascade in Saccharomyces cerevisiae]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e68cd5eed0c484ef36b5

To cope with increased extracellular osmolarity, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae activates the Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which controls a variety of adaptive responses. Hog1 is activated through the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, which consists of a core MAPK cascade and two independent upstream branches (SHO1 and SLN1 branches) containing distinct osmosensing machineries. In the SHO1 branch, a homo-oligomer of Sho1, the four-transmembrane (TM) osmosensor, interacts with the transmembrane co-osmosensors, Hkr1 and Msb2, and the membrane anchor protein Opy2, through their TM domains, and activates the Ste20-Ste11-Pbs2-Hog1 kinase cascade. In this study, we isolated and analyzed hyperactive mutants of Sho1 and Opy2 that harbor mutations within their TM domains. Several hyperactive mutations enhanced the interaction between Sho1 and Opy2, indicating the importance of the TM-mediated interaction between Sho1 and Opy2 for facilitating effective signaling. The interaction between the TM domains of Sho1 and Opy2 will place their respective cytoplasmic binding partners Pbs2 and Ste11 in close proximity. Indeed, genetic analyses of the mutants showed that the Sho1-Opy2 interaction enhances the activation of Pbs2 by Ste11, but not Hog1 by Pbs2. Some of the hyperactive mutants had mutations at the extracellular ends of either Sho1 TM4 or Opy2 TM, and defined the Sho1-Opy2 binding site 1 (BS1). Chemical crosslinking and mutational analyses revealed that the cytoplasmic ends of Sho1 TM1 and Opy2 TM also interact with each other, defining the Sho1-Opy2 binding site 2 (BS2). A geometric consideration constrains that one Opy2 molecule must interact with two adjacent Sho1 molecules in Sho1 oligomer. These results raise a possibility that an alteration of the conformation of the Sho1-Opy2 complex might contributes to the osmotic activation of the Hog1 MAPK cascade.

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<![CDATA[BRASSINOSTEROID-SIGNALING KINASE 3, a plasma membrane-associated scaffold protein involved in early brassinosteroid signaling]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c3d00fcd5eed0c4840374aa

Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroid hormones essential for plant growth and development. The BR signaling pathway has been studied in some detail, however, the functions of the BRASSINOSTEROID-SIGNALING KINASE (BSK) family proteins in the pathway have remained elusive. Through forward genetics, we identified five semi-dominant mutations in the BSK3 gene causing BSK3 loss-of-function and decreased BR responses. We therefore investigated the function of BSK3, a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, in BR signaling and plant growth and development. We find that BSK3 is anchored to the plasma membrane via N-myristoylation, which is required for its function in BR signaling. The N-terminal kinase domain is crucial for BSK3 function, and the C-terminal three tandem TPR motifs contribute to BSK3/BSK3 homodimer and BSK3/BSK1 heterodimer formation. Interestingly, the effects of BSK3 on BR responses are dose-dependent, depending on its protein levels. Our genetic studies indicate that kinase dead BSK3K86R protein partially rescues the bsk3-1 mutant phenotypes. BSK3 directly interacts with the BSK family proteins (BSK3 and BSK1), BRI1 receptor kinase, BSU1 phosphatase, and BIN2 kinase. BIN2 phosphorylation of BSK3 enhances BSK3/BSK3 homodimer and BSK3/BSK1 heterodimer formation, BSK3/BRI1 interaction, and BSK3/BSU1 interaction. Furthermore, we find that BSK3 upregulates BSU1 transcript and protein levels to activate BR signaling. BSK3 is broadly expressed and plays an important role in BR-mediated root growth, shoot growth, and organ separation. Together, our findings suggest that BSK3 may function as a scaffold protein to regulate BR signaling. The results of our studies provide new insights into early BR signaling mechanisms.

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<![CDATA[Integrative network-centric approach reveals signaling pathways associated with plant resistance and susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c1ab846d5eed0c484027628

Plant protein kinases form redundant signaling pathways to perceive microbial pathogens and activate immunity. Bacterial pathogens repress cellular immune responses by secreting effectors, some of which bind and inhibit multiple host kinases. To understand how broadly bacterial effectors may bind protein kinases and the function of these kinase interactors, we first tested kinase–effector (K-E) interactions using the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato–tomato pathosystem. We tested interactions between five individual effectors (HopAI1, AvrPto, HopA1, HopM1, and HopAF1) and 279 tomato kinases in tomato cells. Over half of the tested kinases interacted with at least one effector, and 48% of these kinases interacted with more than three effectors, suggesting a role in the defense. Next, we characterized the role of select multi-effector–interacting kinases and revealed their roles in basal resistance, effector-triggered immunity (ETI), or programmed cell death (PCD). The immune function of several of these kinases was only detectable in the presence of effectors, suggesting that these kinases are critical when particular cell functions are perturbed or that their role is typically masked. To visualize the kinase networks underlying the cellular responses, we derived signal-specific networks. A comparison of the networks revealed a limited overlap between ETI and basal immunity networks. In addition, the basal immune network complexity increased when exposed to some of the effectors. The networks were used to successfully predict the role of a new set of kinases in basal immunity. Our work indicates the complexity of the larger kinase-based defense network and demonstrates how virulence- and avirulence-associated bacterial effectors alter sectors of the defense network.

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<![CDATA[Tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis induces inflammation in Graves’ orbital fibroblasts]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c269778d5eed0c48470f9e8

Tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), along with its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible (Fn)14, is associated with various biological activities including inflammation. However, its role in the pathogenesis of Graves’ orbitopathy (GO) is unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which TWEAK regulates inflammatory signaling in orbital fibroblasts from GO patients. We found that TWEAK and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFA) mRNA levels were upregulated in GO as compared to non-GO tissue samples. TWEAK, TNF receptor (TNFR)1, TNFR2, and TNFR superfamily member 12A mRNA, and TWEAK and Fn14 protein levels were increased by interleukin (IL)-1β and TNF-α treatment. Treatment with exogenous recombinant TWEAK increased the transcript and protein expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 to a greater extent in GO than in non-GO cells, while treatment with the anti-Fn14 antibody ITEM4 suppressed TWEAK-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release and hyaluronan production. Additionally, the serum level of TWEAK was higher in Graves’ disease patients with (341.86 ± 86.3 pg/ml) as compared to those without (294.09 ± 41.44 pg/ml) GO and healthy subjects (255.33 ± 39.38 pg/ml), and was positively correlated with clinical activity score (r = 0.629, P < 0.001) and thyroid binding immunoglobulin level (r = 0.659, P < 0.001). These results demonstrate that TWEAK/Fn14 signaling contributes to GO pathogenesis. Moreover, serum TWEAK level is a potential diagnostic biomarker for inflammatory GO, and modulating TWEAK activity may be an effective therapeutic strategy for suppressing inflammation and tissue remodeling in GO.

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<![CDATA[Conformational sampling of CpxA: Connecting HAMP motions to the histidine kinase function]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c2400b7d5eed0c484098be2

In the histidine kinase family, the HAMP and DHp domains are considered to play an important role into the transmission of signal arising from environmental conditions to the auto-phosphorylation site and to the binding site of response regulator. Several conformational motions inside HAMP have been proposed to transmit this signal: (i) the gearbox model, (ii) α helices rotations, pistons and scissoring, (iii) transition between ordered and disordered states. In the present work, we explore by temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics (TAMD), an enhanced sampling technique, the conformational space of the cytoplasmic region of histidine kinase CpxA. Several HAMP motions, corresponding to α helices rotations, pistoning and scissoring have been detected and correlated to the segmental motions of HAMP and DHp domains of CpxA.

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<![CDATA[Protein Kinase Activity of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Regulates Cytokine-Dependent Cell Survival]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da1bab0ee8fa60b7ceee

The protein kinase activity of PI3K phosphorylates specific serine residues in growth factor receptors to promote cell survival; these events are constitutively activated in some leukemias.

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<![CDATA[[Pt(O,O’-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] Alters SH-SY5Y Cell Migration and Invasion by the Inhibition of Na+/H+ Exchanger Isoform 1 Occurring through a PKC-ε/ERK/mTOR Pathway]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f0ab0ee8fa60b6e4be

We previously showed that [Pt(O,O’-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] ([Pt(acac)2(DMS)]) exerted substantial cytotoxic effects in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, and decreased metalloproteases (MMPs) production and cells migration in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The ubiquitously distributed sodium-hydrogen antiporter 1 (NHE1) is involved in motility and invasion of many solid tumours. The present study focuses on the effects of [Pt(acac)2(DMS)] in SH-SY5Y cell migration and also on the possibility that NHE1 may be involved in such effect. After sublethal [Pt(acac)2(DMS)] treatment cell migration was examined by wounding assay and cell invasion by transwell assay. NHE1 activity was measured in BCECF-loaded SH-SY5Y as the rate of Na+-dependent intracellular pH recovery in response to an acute acid pulse. Gelatin zymography for MMP-2/9 activities, Western blottings of MMPs, MAPKs, mTOR, S6 and PKCs and small interfering RNAs to PKC-ε/-δ mRNA were performed. Sublethal concentrations of [Pt(acac)2(DMS)] decreases NHE1 activity, inhibites cell migration and invasion and decreases expression and activity of MMP-2 and -9. [Pt(acac)2(DMS)] administered to SH-SY5Y cells provokes the increment of ROS, generated by NADPH oxidase, responsible for the PKC-ε and PKC-δ activation. Whilst PKC-δ activates p38/MAPK, responsible for the inhibition of MMP-2 and -9 secretion, PKC-ε activates a pathway made of ERK1/2, mTOR and S6K responsible for the inhibition of NHE1 activity and cell migration. In conclusion, we have shown a drastic impairment in tumour cell metastatization in response to inhibition of NHE1 and MMPs activities by [Pt(acac)2(DMS)] occurring through a novel mechanism mediated by PKC-δ/-ε activation.

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<![CDATA[Hypoxia Enhances the Proliferative Response of Macrophages to CSF-1 and Their Pro-Survival Response to TNF]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da0bab0ee8fa60b77acf

In chronic inflammatory lesions there are increased numbers of macrophages with a possible contribution of enhanced survival/proliferation due, for example, to cytokine action; such lesions are often hypoxic. Prior studies have found that culture in low oxygen can promote monocyte/macrophage survival. We show here, using pharmacologic inhibitors, that the hypoxia-induced pro-survival response of macrophages exhibits a dependence on PI3-kinase and mTOR activities but surprisingly is suppressed by Akt and p38 MAPK activities. It was also found that in hypoxia at CSF-1 concentrations, which under normoxic conditions are suboptimal for macrophage proliferation, macrophages can proliferate more strongly with no evidence for alteration in CSF-1 receptor degradation kinetics. TNF promoted macrophage survival in normoxic conditions with an additive effect in hypoxia. The enhanced hypoxia-dependent survival and/or proliferation of macrophages in the presence of CSF-1 or TNF may contribute to their elevated numbers at a site of chronic inflammation.

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<![CDATA[The Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) Receptor Sustains ERK1/2 Activation and Proliferation in Breast Cancer Cell Lines]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f8ab0ee8fa60b70fef

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in western countries. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) and its receptor (CSF-1R) regulate macrophage and osteoclast production, trophoblast implantation and mammary gland development. The expression of CSF-1R and/or CSF-1 strongly correlates with poor prognosis in several human epithelial tumors, including breast carcinomas. We demonstrate that CSF-1 and CSF-1R are expressed, although at different levels, in 16/17 breast cancer cell lines tested with no differences among molecular subtypes. The role of CSF-1/CSF-1R in the proliferation of breast cancer cells was then studied in MDAMB468 and SKBR3 cells belonging to different subtypes. CSF-1 administration induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and enhanced cell proliferation in both cell lines. Furthermore, the inhibition of CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling, by CSF-1R siRNA or imatinib treatment, impaired CSF-1 induced ERK1/2 activation and cell proliferation. We also demonstrate that c-Jun, cyclin D1 and c-Myc, known for their involvement in cell proliferation, are downstream CSF-1R in breast cancer cells. The presence of a proliferative CSF-1/CSF-1R autocrine loop involving ERK1/2 was also found. The wide expression of the CSF-1/CSF-1R pair across breast cancer cell subtypes supports CSF-1/CSF-1R targeting in breast cancer therapy.

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<![CDATA[Development of a High-Throughput Assay for Identifying Inhibitors of TBK1 and IKKε]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da0dab0ee8fa60b782bb

IKKε and TBK1 are noncanonical IKK family members which regulate inflammatory signaling pathways and also play important roles in oncogenesis. However, few inhibitors of these kinases have been identified. While the substrate specificity of IKKε has recently been described, the substrate specificity of TBK1 is unknown, hindering the development of high-throughput screening technologies for inhibitor identification. Here, we describe the optimal substrate phosphorylation motif for TBK1, and show that it is identical to the phosphorylation motif previously described for IKKε. This information enabled the design of an optimal TBK1/IKKε substrate peptide amenable to high-throughput screening and we assayed a 6,006 compound library that included 4,727 kinase-focused compounds to discover in vitro inhibitors of TBK1 and IKKε. 227 compounds in this library inhibited TBK1 at a concentration of 10 µM, while 57 compounds inhibited IKKε. Together, these data describe a new high-throughput screening assay which will facilitate the discovery of small molecule TBK1/IKKε inhibitors possessing therapeutic potential for both inflammatory diseases and cancer.

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<![CDATA[Phosphorylation of p65(RelA) on Ser547 by ATM Represses NF-κB-Dependent Transcription of Specific Genes after Genotoxic Stress]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da8fab0ee8fa60b9f5f5

The NF-κB pathway is involved in immune and inflammation responses, proliferation, differentiation and cell death or survival. It is activated by many external stimuli including genotoxic stress. DNA double-strand breaks activate NF-κB in an ATM-dependent manner. In this manuscript, a direct interaction between p65(RelA) and the N-terminal extremity of ATM is reported. We also report that only one of the five potential ATM-(S/T)Q target sites present in p65, namely Ser547, is specifically phosphorylated by ATM in vitro. A comparative transcriptomic analysis performed in HEK-293 cells expressing either wild-type HA-p65 or a non-phosphorylatable mutant HA-p65S547A identified several differentially transcribed genes after an etoposide treatment (e.g. IL8, A20, SELE). The transcription of these genes is increased in cells expressing the mutant. Substitution of Ser547 to alanine does not affect p65 binding abilities on the κB site of the IL8 promoter but reduces p65 interaction with HDAC1. Cells expressing p65S547A have a higher level of histone H3 acetylated on Lys9 at the IL8 promoter, which is in agreement with the higher gene induction observed. These results indicate that ATM regulates a sub-set of NF-κB dependent genes after a genotoxic stress by direct phosphorylation of p65.

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<![CDATA[Human Cataract Mutations in EPHA2 SAM Domain Alter Receptor Stability and Function]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da6dab0ee8fa60b938cf

The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of cataracts leading to visual impairment remain poorly understood. In recent studies, several mutations in the cytoplasmic sterile-α-motif (SAM) domain of human EPHA2 on chromosome 1p36 have been associated with hereditary cataracts in several families. Here, we have investigated how these SAM domain mutations affect EPHA2 activity. We showed that the SAM domain mutations dramatically destabilized the EPHA2 protein in a proteasome-dependent pathway, as evidenced by the increase of EPHA2 receptor levels in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132. In addition, the expression of wild-type EPHA2 promoted the migration of the mouse lens epithelial αTN4-1 cells in the absence of ligand stimulation, whereas the mutants exhibited significantly reduced activity. In contrast, stimulation of EPHA2 with its ligand ephrin-A5 eradicates the enhancement of cell migration accompanied by Akt activation. Taken together, our studies suggest that the SAM domain of the EPHA2 protein plays critical roles in enhancing the stability of EPHA2 by modulating the proteasome-dependent process. Furthermore, activation of Akt switches EPHA2 from promoting to inhibiting cell migration upon ephrin-A5 binding. Our results provide the first report of multiple EPHA2 cataract mutations contributing to the destabilization of the receptor and causing the loss of cell migration activity.

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<![CDATA[Sphingosine Kinase 1 Regulates the Akt/FOXO3a/Bim Pathway and Contributes to Apoptosis Resistance in Glioma Cells]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daf2ab0ee8fa60bc183d

The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism through which Sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK1) exerts its anti-apoptosis activity in glioma cancer cells. We here report that dysregulation of SPHK1 alters the sensitivity of glioma to apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Further mechanistic study examined the expression of Bcl-2 family members, including Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bax and Bim, in SPHK1-overexpressing glioma cells and revealed that only pro-apoptotic Bim was downregulated by SPHK1. Moreover, the transcriptional level of Bim was also altered by SPHK1 in glioma cells. We next confirmed the correlation between SPHK1 and Bim expression in primary glioma specimens. Importantly, increasing SPHK1 expression in glioma cells markedly elevated Akt activity and phosphorylated inactivation of FOXO3a, which led to downregulation of Bim. A pharmacological approach showed that these effects of SPHK1 were dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Furthermore, effects of SPHK1 on Akt/FOXO3a/Bim pathway could be reversed by SPHK1 specific RNA interference or SPHK1 inhibitor. Collectively, our results indicate that regulation of the Akt/FOXO3a/Bim pathway may be a novel mechanism by which SPHK1 protects glioma cells from apoptosis, thereby involved in glioma tumorigenesis.

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<![CDATA[Adenosine Stimulates the Migration of Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells. Role ofCXCR4 and MicroRNA-150]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db05ab0ee8fa60bc80d8

Background

Administration of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) represents a promising option to regenerate the heart after myocardial infarction, but is limited because of low recruitment and engraftment in the myocardium. Mobilization and migration of EPC are mainly controlled by stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α) and its receptor CXCR4. We hypothesized that adenosine, a cardioprotective molecule, may improve the recruitment of EPC to the heart.

Methods

EPC were obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers. Expression of chemokines and their receptors was evaluated using microarrays, quantitative PCR, and flow cytometry. A Boyden chamber assay was used to assess chemotaxis. Recruitment of EPC to the infarcted heart was evaluated in rats after permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery.

Results

Microarray analysis revealed that adenosine modulates the expression of several members of the chemokine family in EPC. Among these, CXCR4 was up-regulated by adenosine, and this result was confirmed by quantitative PCR (3-fold increase, P<0.001). CXCR4 expression at the cell surface was also increased. This effect involved the A2B receptor. Pretreatment of EPC with adenosine amplified their migration towards recombinant SDF-1α or conditioned medium from cardiac fibroblasts. Both effects were abolished by CXCR4 blocking antibodies. Adenosine also increased CXCR4 under ischemic conditions, and decreased miR-150 expression. Binding of miR-150 to the 3′ untranslated region of CXCR4 was verified by luciferase assay. Addition of pre-miR-150 blunted the effect of adenosine on CXCR4. Administration of adenosine to rats after induction of myocardial infarction stimulated EPC recruitment to the heart and enhanced angiogenesis.

Conclusion

Adenosine increases the migration of EPC. The mechanism involves A2B receptor activation, decreased expression of miR-150 and increased expression of CXCR4. These results suggest that adenosine may be used to enhance the capacity of EPC to revascularize the ischemic heart.

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<![CDATA[Intestinal Cell Kinase Is a Novel Participant in Intestinal Cell Signaling Responses to Protein Malnutrition]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dafbab0ee8fa60bc4965

Nutritional deficiency and stress can severely impair intestinal architecture, integrity and host immune defense, leading to increased susceptibility to infection and cancer. Although the intestine has an inherent capability to adapt to environmental stress, the molecular mechanisms by which the intestine senses and responds to malnutrition are not completely understood. We hereby report that intestinal cell kinase (ICK), a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, is a novel component of the adaptive cell signaling responses to protein malnutrition in murine small intestine. Using an experimental mouse model, we demonstrated that intestinal ICK protein level was markedly and transiently elevated upon protein deprivation, concomitant with activation of prominent pro-proliferation and pro-survival pathways of Wnt/β-catenin, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) as well as increased expression of intestinal stem cell markers. Using the human ileocecal epithelial cell line HCT-8 as an in vitro model, we further demonstrated that serum starvation was able to induce up-regulation of ICK protein in intestinal epithelial cells in a reversible manner, and that serum albumin partially contributed to this effect. Knockdown of ICK expression in HCT-8 cells significantly impaired cell proliferation and down-regulated active β-catenin signal. Furthermore, reduced ICK expression in HCT-8 cells induced apoptosis through a caspase-dependent mechanism. Taken together, our findings suggest that increased ICK expression/activity in response to protein deprivation likely provides a novel protective mechanism to limit apoptosis and support compensatory mucosal growth under nutritional stress.

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<![CDATA[Dynamics robustness of cascading systems]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db54ab0ee8fa60bdd007

A most important property of biochemical systems is robustness. Static robustness, e.g., homeostasis, is the insensitivity of a state against perturbations, whereas dynamics robustness, e.g., homeorhesis, is the insensitivity of a dynamic process. In contrast to the extensively studied static robustness, dynamics robustness, i.e., how a system creates an invariant temporal profile against perturbations, is little explored despite transient dynamics being crucial for cellular fates and are reported to be robust experimentally. For example, the duration of a stimulus elicits different phenotypic responses, and signaling networks process and encode temporal information. Hence, robustness in time courses will be necessary for functional biochemical networks. Based on dynamical systems theory, we uncovered a general mechanism to achieve dynamics robustness. Using a three-stage linear signaling cascade as an example, we found that the temporal profiles and response duration post-stimulus is robust to perturbations against certain parameters. Then analyzing the linearized model, we elucidated the criteria of when signaling cascades will display dynamics robustness. We found that changes in the upstream modules are masked in the cascade, and that the response duration is mainly controlled by the rate-limiting module and organization of the cascade’s kinetics. Specifically, we found two necessary conditions for dynamics robustness in signaling cascades: 1) Constraint on the rate-limiting process: The phosphatase activity in the perturbed module is not the slowest. 2) Constraints on the initial conditions: The kinase activity needs to be fast enough such that each module is saturated even with fast phosphatase activity and upstream changes are attenuated. We discussed the relevance of such robustness to several biological examples and the validity of the above conditions therein. Given the applicability of dynamics robustness to a variety of systems, it will provide a general basis for how biological systems function dynamically.

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<![CDATA[Minimal oscillating subnetwork in the Huang-Ferrell model of the MAPK cascade]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5fab0ee8fa60be1166

Prompted by the recent growing evidence of oscillatory behavior involving MAPK cascades we present a systematic approach of analyzing models and elucidating the nature of biochemical oscillations based on reaction network theory. In particular, we formulate a minimal biochemically consistent mass action subnetwork of the Huang-Ferrell model of the MAPK signalling that provides an oscillatory response when a parameter controlling the activation of the top-tier kinase is varied. Such dynamics are either intertwined with or separated from the earlier found bistable/hysteretic behavior in this model. Using the theory of stability of stoichiometric networks, we reduce the original MAPK model, convert kinetic to convex parameters and examine those properties of the minimal subnetwork that underlie the oscillatory dynamics. We also use the methods of classification of chemical oscillatory networks to explain the rhythmic behavior in physicochemical terms, i.e., we identify of the role of individual biochemical species in positive and negative feedback loops and describe their coordinated action leading to oscillations. Our approach provides an insight into dynamics without the necessity of knowing rate coefficients and thus is useful prior the statistical evaluation of parameters.

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