ResearchPad - protein-structure-determination https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[NMR resonance assignment and structure prediction of the C-terminal domain of the microtubule end-binding protein 3]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_15736 End-binding proteins (EBs) associate with the growing microtubule plus ends to regulate microtubule dynamics as well as the interaction with intracellular structures. EB3 contributes to pathological vascular leakage through interacting with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor 3 (IP3R3), a calcium channel located at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The C-terminal domain of EB3 (residues 200–281) is functionally important for this interaction because it contains the effector binding sites, a prerequisite for EB3 activity and specificity. Structural data for this domain is limited. Here, we report the backbone chemical shift assignments for the human EB3 C-terminal domain and computationally explore its EB3 conformations. Backbone assignments, along with computational models, will allow future investigation of EB3 structural dynamics, interactions with effectors, and will facilitate the development of novel EB3 inhibitors.

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<![CDATA[Crystal structure of a Thermus aquaticus diversity-generating retroelement variable protein]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c40f7b0d5eed0c484386634

Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) are widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and microbial viruses, and bring about unparalleled levels of sequence variation in target proteins. While DGR variable proteins share low sequence identity, the structures of several such proteins have revealed the C-type lectin (CLec)-fold as a conserved scaffold for accommodating massive sequence variation. This conservation has led to the suggestion that the CLec-fold may be useful in molecular surface display applications. Thermostability is an attractive feature in such applications, and thus we studied the variable protein of a DGR encoded by a prophage of the thermophile Thermus aquaticus. We report here the 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure of the variable protein from the T. aquaticus DGR, called TaqVP, and confirm that it has a CLec-fold. Remarkably, its variable region is nearly identical in structure to those of several other CLec-fold DGR variable proteins despite low sequence identity among these. TaqVP was found to be thermostable, which appears to be a property shared by several CLec-fold DGR variable proteins. These results provide impetus for the pursuit of the DGR variable protein CLec-fold in molecular display applications.

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<![CDATA[Coevolving residues inform protein dynamics profiles and disease susceptibility of nSNVs]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c09945dd5eed0c4842aeb26

The conformational dynamics of proteins is rarely used in methodologies used to predict the impact of genetic mutations due to the paucity of three-dimensional protein structures as compared to the vast number of available sequences. Until now a three-dimensional (3D) structure has been required to predict the conformational dynamics of a protein. We introduce an approach that estimates the conformational dynamics of a protein, without relying on structural information. This de novo approach utilizes coevolving residues identified from a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) using Potts models. These coevolving residues are used as contacts in a Gaussian network model (GNM) to obtain protein dynamics. B-factors calculated using sequence-based GNM (Seq-GNM) are in agreement with crystallographic B-factors as well as theoretical B-factors from the original GNM that utilizes the 3D structure. Moreover, we demonstrate the ability of the calculated B-factors from the Seq-GNM approach to discriminate genomic variants according to their phenotypes for a wide range of proteins. These results suggest that protein dynamics can be approximated based on sequence information alone, making it possible to assess the phenotypes of nSNVs in cases where a 3D structure is unknown. We hope this work will promote the use of dynamics information in genetic disease prediction at scale by circumventing the need for 3D structures.

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<![CDATA[De novo protein structure prediction using ultra-fast molecular dynamics simulation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5bfdb391d5eed0c4845ca84a

Modern genomics sequencing techniques have provided a massive amount of protein sequences, but experimental endeavor in determining protein structures is largely lagging far behind the vast and unexplored sequences. Apparently, computational biology is playing a more important role in protein structure prediction than ever. Here, we present a system of de novo predictor, termed NiDelta, building on a deep convolutional neural network and statistical potential enabling molecular dynamics simulation for modeling protein tertiary structure. Combining with evolutionary-based residue-contacts, the presented predictor can predict the tertiary structures of a number of target proteins with remarkable accuracy. The proposed approach is demonstrated by calculations on a set of eighteen large proteins from different fold classes. The results show that the ultra-fast molecular dynamics simulation could dramatically reduce the gap between the sequence and its structure at atom level, and it could also present high efficiency in protein structure determination if sparse experimental data is available.

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<![CDATA[SAFlex: A structural alphabet extension to integrate protein structural flexibility and missing data information]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5b4a196a463d7e428027f8b1

In this paper, we describe SAFlex (Structural Alphabet Flexibility), an extension of an existing structural alphabet (HMM-SA), to better explore increasing protein three dimensional structure information by encoding conformations of proteins in case of missing residues or uncertainties. An SA aims to reduce three dimensional conformations of proteins as well as their analysis and comparison complexity by simplifying any conformation in a series of structural letters. Our methodology presents several novelties. Firstly, it can account for the encoding uncertainty by providing a wide range of encoding options: the maximum a posteriori, the marginal posterior distribution, and the effective number of letters at each given position. Secondly, our new algorithm deals with the missing data in the protein structure files (concerning more than 75% of the proteins from the Protein Data Bank) in a rigorous probabilistic framework. Thirdly, SAFlex is able to encode and to build a consensus encoding from different replicates of a single protein such as several homomer chains. This allows localizing structural differences between different chains and detecting structural variability, which is essential for protein flexibility identification. These improvements are illustrated on different proteins, such as the crystal structure of an eukaryotic small heat shock protein. They are promising to explore increasing protein redundancy data and obtain useful quantification of their flexibility.

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<![CDATA[Structure and Calcium Binding Properties of a Neuronal Calcium-Myristoyl Switch Protein, Visinin-Like Protein 3]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da92ab0ee8fa60ba0676

Visinin-like protein 3 (VILIP-3) belongs to a family of Ca2+-myristoyl switch proteins that regulate signal transduction in the brain and retina. Here we analyze Ca2+ binding, characterize Ca2+-induced conformational changes, and determine the NMR structure of myristoylated VILIP-3. Three Ca2+ bind cooperatively to VILIP-3 at EF2, EF3 and EF4 (KD = 0.52 μM and Hill slope of 1.8). NMR assignments, mutagenesis and structural analysis indicate that the covalently attached myristoyl group is solvent exposed in Ca2+-bound VILIP-3, whereas Ca2+-free VILIP-3 contains a sequestered myristoyl group that interacts with protein residues (E26, Y64, V68), which are distinct from myristate contacts seen in other Ca2+-myristoyl switch proteins. The myristoyl group in VILIP-3 forms an unusual L-shaped structure that places the C14 methyl group inside a shallow protein groove, in contrast to the much deeper myristoyl binding pockets observed for recoverin, NCS-1 and GCAP1. Thus, the myristoylated VILIP-3 protein structure determined in this study is quite different from those of other known myristoyl switch proteins (recoverin, NCS-1, and GCAP1). We propose that myristoylation serves to fine tune the three-dimensional structures of neuronal calcium sensor proteins as a means of generating functional diversity.

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<![CDATA[Structure of the N-Terminal Gyrase B Fragment in Complex with ADP⋅Pi Reveals Rigid-Body Motion Induced by ATP Hydrolysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9d4ab0ee8fa60b654e6

Type II DNA topoisomerases are essential enzymes that catalyze topological rearrangement of double-stranded DNA using the free energy generated by ATP hydrolysis. Bacterial DNA gyrase is a prototype of this family and is composed of two subunits (GyrA, GyrB) that form a GyrA2GyrB2 heterotetramer. The N-terminal 43-kDa fragment of GyrB (GyrB43) from E. coli comprising the ATPase and the transducer domains has been studied extensively. The dimeric fragment is competent for ATP hydrolysis and its structure in complex with the substrate analog AMPPNP is known. Here, we have determined the remaining conformational states of the enzyme along the ATP hydrolysis reaction path by solving crystal structures of GyrB43 in complex with ADP⋅BeF3, ADP⋅Pi, and ADP. Upon hydrolysis, the enzyme undergoes an obligatory 12° domain rearrangement to accommodate the 1.5 Å increase in distance between the γ- and β-phosphate of the nucleotide within the sealed binding site at the domain interface. Conserved residues from the QTK loop of the transducer domain (also part of the domain interface) couple the small structural change within the binding site with the rigid body motion. The domain reorientation is reflected in a significant 7 Å increase in the separation of the two transducer domains of the dimer that would embrace one of the DNA segments in full-length gyrase. The observed conformational change is likely to be relevant for the allosteric coordination of ATP hydrolysis with DNA binding, cleavage/re-ligation and/or strand passage.

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<![CDATA[Sequence Based Prediction of Antioxidant Proteins Using a Classifier Selection Strategy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db2bab0ee8fa60bd15af

Antioxidant proteins perform significant functions in maintaining oxidation/antioxidation balance and have potential therapies for some diseases. Accurate identification of antioxidant proteins could contribute to revealing physiological processes of oxidation/antioxidation balance and developing novel antioxidation-based drugs. In this study, an ensemble method is presented to predict antioxidant proteins with hybrid features, incorporating SSI (Secondary Structure Information), PSSM (Position Specific Scoring Matrix), RSA (Relative Solvent Accessibility), and CTD (Composition, Transition, Distribution). The prediction results of the ensemble predictor are determined by an average of prediction results of multiple base classifiers. Based on a classifier selection strategy, we obtain an optimal ensemble classifier composed of RF (Random Forest), SMO (Sequential Minimal Optimization), NNA (Nearest Neighbor Algorithm), and J48 with an accuracy of 0.925. A Relief combined with IFS (Incremental Feature Selection) method is adopted to obtain optimal features from hybrid features. With the optimal features, the ensemble method achieves improved performance with a sensitivity of 0.95, a specificity of 0.93, an accuracy of 0.94, and an MCC (Matthew’s Correlation Coefficient) of 0.880, far better than the existing method. To evaluate the prediction performance objectively, the proposed method is compared with existing methods on the same independent testing dataset. Encouragingly, our method performs better than previous studies. In addition, our method achieves more balanced performance with a sensitivity of 0.878 and a specificity of 0.860. These results suggest that the proposed ensemble method can be a potential candidate for antioxidant protein prediction. For public access, we develop a user-friendly web server for antioxidant protein identification that is freely accessible at http://antioxidant.weka.cc.

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<![CDATA[Fragment library screening identifies hits that bind to the non-catalytic surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DsbA1]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db53ab0ee8fa60bdc9bf

At a time when the antibiotic drug discovery pipeline has stalled, antibiotic resistance is accelerating with catastrophic implications for our ability to treat bacterial infections. Globally we face the prospect of a future when common infections can once again kill. Anti-virulence approaches that target the capacity of the bacterium to cause disease rather than the growth or survival of the bacterium itself offer a tantalizing prospect of novel antimicrobials. They may also reduce the propensity to induce resistance by removing the strong selection pressure imparted by bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, disulfide bond protein A (PaDsbA1) plays a central role in the oxidative folding of virulence factors and is therefore an attractive target for the development of new anti-virulence antimicrobials. Using a fragment-based approach we have identified small molecules that bind to PaDsbA1. The fragment hits show selective binding to PaDsbA1 over the DsbA protein from Escherichia coli, suggesting that developing species-specific narrow-spectrum inhibitors of DsbA enzymes may be feasible. Structures of a co-complex of PaDsbA1 with the highest affinity fragment identified in the screen reveal that the fragment binds on the non-catalytic surface of the protein at a domain interface. This biophysical and structural data represent a starting point in the development of higher affinity compounds, which will be assessed for their potential as selective PaDsbA1 inhibitors.

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<![CDATA[Thermal stability and structural changes in bacterial toxins responsible for food poisoning]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db51ab0ee8fa60bdc4ad

The staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are secreted by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and are the most common causative agent in staphylococcal food poisoning. The staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) has been associated with large staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks, but newer identified SEs, like staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) has recently been shown to be present at similar levels as SEA in food poisoning outbreaks. Thus, we set out to investigate the thermo-stability of the three-dimensional structures of SEA, SEH and staphylococcal enterotoxin E (SEE), since heat inactivation is a common method to inactivate toxins during food processing. Interestingly, the investigated toxins behaved distinctly different upon heating. SEA and SEE were more stable at slightly acidic pH values, while SEH adopted an extremely stable structure at neutral pH, with almost no effects on secondary structural elements upon heating to 95°C, and with reversible formation of tertiary structure upon subsequent cooling to room temperature. Taken together, the data suggests that the family of staphylococcal enterotoxins have different ability to withstand heat, and thus the exact profile of heat inactivation for all SEs causing food poisoning needs to be considered to improve food safety.

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<![CDATA[Structure determination of a major facilitator peptide transporter: Inward facing PepTSt from Streptococcus thermophilus crystallized in space group P3121]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbdc2

Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) peptide transporters (typically referred to as PepT, POT or PTR transporters) mediate the uptake of di- and tripeptides, and so play an important dietary role in many organisms. In recent years, a better understanding of the molecular basis for this process has emerged, which is in large part due to a steep increase in structural information. Yet, the conformational transitions underlying the transport mechanism are still not fully understood, and additional data is therefore needed. Here we report in detail the detergent screening, crystallization, experimental MIRAS phasing, and refinement of the peptide transporter PepTSt from Streptococcus thermophilus. The space group is P3121, and the protein is crystallized in a monomeric inward facing form. The binding site is likely to be somewhat occluded, as the lobe encompassing transmembrane helices 10 and 11 is markedly bent towards the central pore of the protein, but the extent of this potential occlusion could not be determined due to disorder at the apex of the lobe. Based on structural comparisons with the seven previously determined P212121 and C2221 structures of inward facing PepTSt, the structural flexibility as well as the conformational changes mediating transition between the inward open and inward facing occluded states are discussed. In conclusion, this report improves our understanding of the structure and conformational cycle of PepTSt, and can furthermore serve as a case study, which may aid in supporting future structure determinations of additional MFS transporters or other integral membrane proteins.

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<![CDATA[Alpha Helices Are More Robust to Mutations than Beta Strands]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daa8ab0ee8fa60ba8496

The rapidly increasing amount of data on human genetic variation has resulted in a growing demand to identify pathogenic mutations computationally, as their experimental validation is currently beyond reach. Here we show that alpha helices and beta strands differ significantly in their ability to tolerate mutations: helices can accumulate more mutations than strands without change, due to the higher numbers of inter-residue contacts in helices. This results in two patterns: a) the same number of mutations causes less structural change in helices than in strands; b) helices diverge more rapidly in sequence than strands within the same domains. Additionally, both helices and strands are significantly more robust than coils. Based on this observation we show that human missense mutations that change secondary structure are more likely to be pathogenic than those that do not. Moreover, inclusion of predicted secondary structure changes shows significant utility for improving upon state-of-the-art pathogenicity predictions.

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<![CDATA[Structural Analysis and Insights into the Oligomeric State of an Arginine-Dependent Transcriptional Regulator from Bacillus halodurans]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db0aab0ee8fa60bc9aea

The arginine repressor (ArgR) is an arginine-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the arginine biosynthesis and catabolic pathways. ArgR is a functional homolog of the arginine-dependent repressor/activator AhrC from Bacillus subtilis, and belongs to the ArgR/AhrC family of transcriptional regulators. In this research, we determined the structure of the ArgR (Bh2777) from Bacillus halodurans at 2.41 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The ArgR from B. halodurans appeared to be a trimer in a size exclusion column and in the crystal structure. However, it formed a hexamer in the presence of L-arginine in multi-angle light scattering (MALS) studies, indicating the oligomerization state was dependent on the presence of L-arginine. The trimeric structure showed that the C-terminal domains form the core, which was made by inter-subunit interactions mainly through hydrophobic contacts, while the N-terminal domains containing a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif were arranged around the periphery. The arrangement of trimeric structure in the B. halodurans ArgR was different from those of other ArgR homologs previously reported. We finally showed that the B. halodurans ArgR has an arginine-dependent DNA binding property by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay.

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<![CDATA[Crystal Structure of an Invasivity-Associated Domain of SdrE in S. aureus]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4fab0ee8fa60bdba6e

The surface protein SdrE, a microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM) family protein expressed on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), can recognize human complement regulator Factor H and C4BP, thus making it a potentially promising vaccine candidate. In this study, SdrE278-591 was found to directly affect S. aureus host cell invasion. Additionally, the crystal structure of SdrE278-591 at a resolution of 1.25 Å was established, with the three-dimensional structure revealing N2-N3 domains which fold in a manner similar to an IgG fold. Furthermore, a putative ligand binding site located at a conserved charged groove formed by the interface between N2 and N3 domains was identified, with β2 suspected to occupy the ligand recognizing site and undergo a structural rearrangement to allow ligand binding. Overall, these findings have further contributed to the understanding of SdrE as a key factor for S. aureus invasivity and will enable a better understanding of bacterial infection processes.

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<![CDATA[Stubborn Contaminants: Influence of Detergents on the Purity of the Multidrug ABC Transporter BmrA]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da5dab0ee8fa60b90442

Despite the growing interest in membrane proteins, their crystallization remains a major challenge. In the course of a crystallographic study on the multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporter BmrA, mass spectral analyses on samples purified with six selected detergents revealed unexpected protein contamination visible for the most part on overloaded SDS-PAGE. A major contamination from the outer membrane protein OmpF was detected in purifications with Foscholine 12 (FC12) but not with Lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO) or any of the maltose-based detergents. Consequently, in the FC12 purified BmrA, OmpF easily crystallized over BmrA in a new space group, and whose structure is reported here. We therefore devised an optimized protocol to eliminate OmpF during the FC12 purification of BmrA. On the other hand, an additional band visible at ∼110 kDa was detected in all samples purified with the maltose-based detergents. It contained AcrB that crystallized over BmrA despite its trace amounts. Highly pure BmrA preparations could be obtained using either a ΔacrAB E. coli strain and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside, or a classical E. coli strain and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol for the overexpression and purification, respectively. Overall our results urge to incorporate a proteomics-based purity analysis into quality control checks prior to commencing crystallization assays of membrane proteins that are notoriously arduous to crystallize. Moreover, the strategies developed here to selectively eliminate obstinate contaminants should be applicable to the purification of other membrane proteins overexpressed in E. coli.

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<![CDATA[Streptomyces coelicolor SCO4226 Is a Nickel Binding Protein]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dae0ab0ee8fa60bbb885

The open reading frame SCO4226 of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) encodes an 82-residue hypothetical protein. Biochemical assays revealed that each SCO4226 dimer binds four nickel ions. To decipher the molecular function, we solved the crystal structures of SCO4226 in both apo- and nickel-bound (Ni-SCO4226) forms at 1.30 and 2.04 Å resolution, respectively. Each subunit of SCO4226 dimer adopts a canonical ferredoxin-like fold with five β-strands flanked by two α-helices. In the structure of Ni-SCO4226, four nickel ions are coordinated at the surface of the dimer. Further biochemical assays suggested that the binding of Ni2+ triggers the self-aggregation of SCO4226 in vitro. In addition, RT-qPCR assays demonstrated that the expression of SCO4226 gene in S. coelicolor is specifically up-regulated by the addition of Ni2+, but not other divalent ions such as Cu2+, Mn2+ or Co2+. All these results suggested that SCO4226 acts as a nickel binding protein, probably required for nickel sequestration and/or detoxification.

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<![CDATA[The Crystal Structures of Apo and cAMP-Bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum Reveal Structural and Dynamic Changes upon cAMP Binding in CRP/FNR Family Transcription Factors]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da22ab0ee8fa60b7f3c7

The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator) transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

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<![CDATA[The Structure of an LIM-Only Protein 4 (LMO4) and Deformed Epidermal Autoregulatory Factor-1 (DEAF1) Complex Reveals a Common Mode of Binding to LMO4]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dadfab0ee8fa60bbb21b

LIM-domain only protein 4 (LMO4) is a widely expressed protein with important roles in embryonic development and breast cancer. It has been reported to bind many partners, including the transcription factor Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (DEAF1), with which LMO4 shares many biological parallels. We used yeast two-hybrid assays to show that DEAF1 binds both LIM domains of LMO4 and that DEAF1 binds the same face on LMO4 as two other LMO4-binding partners, namely LIM domain binding protein 1 (LDB1) and C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CtIP/RBBP8). Mutagenic screening analysed by the same method, indicates that the key residues in the interaction lie in LMO4LIM2 and the N-terminal half of the LMO4-binding domain in DEAF1. We generated a stable LMO4LIM2-DEAF1 complex and determined the solution structure of that complex. Although the LMO4-binding domain from DEAF1 is intrinsically disordered, it becomes structured on binding. The structure confirms that LDB1, CtIP and DEAF1 all bind to the same face on LMO4. LMO4 appears to form a hub in protein-protein interaction networks, linking numerous pathways within cells. Competitive binding for LMO4 therefore most likely provides a level of regulation between those different pathways.

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<![CDATA[The Impact of Nitration on the Structure and Immunogenicity of the Major Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 1.0101]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da1fab0ee8fa60b7e32e

Allergy prevalence has increased in industrialized countries. One contributing factor could be pollution, which can cause nitration of allergens exogenously (in the air) or endogenously (in inflamed lung tissue). We investigated the impact of nitration on both the structural and immunological behavior of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101 to determine whether nitration might be a factor in the increased incidence of allergy. Bet v 1.0101 was nitrated with tetranitromethane. Immune effects were assessed by measuring the proliferation of specific T-cell lines (TCLs) upon stimulation with different concentrations of nitrated and unmodified allergen, and by measurement of cytokine release of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and primary DCs (primDCs) stimulated with nitrated versus unmodified allergen. HPLC-MS, crystallography, gel electrophoresis, amino acid analysis, size exclusion chromatography and molecular dynamics simulation were performed to characterize structural changes after nitration of the allergen. The proliferation of specific TCLs was higher upon stimulation with the nitrated allergen in comparison to the unmodified allergen. An important structural consequence of nitration was oligomerization. Moreover, analysis of the crystal structure of nitrated Bet v 1.0101 showed that amino acid residue Y83, located in the hydrophobic cavity, was nitrated to 100%. Both moDCs and primDCs showed decreased production of TH1-priming cytokines, thus favoring a TH2 response. These results implicate that nitration of Bet v 1.0101 might be a contributing factor to the observed increase in birch pollen allergy, and emphasize the importance of protein modifications in understanding the molecular basis of allergenicity.

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<![CDATA[The Identification and Structure of an N-Terminal PR Domain Show that FOG1 Is a Member of the PRDM Family of Proteins]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da2aab0ee8fa60b82119

FOG1 is a transcriptional regulator that acts in concert with the hematopoietic master regulator GATA1 to coordinate the differentiation of platelets and erythrocytes. Despite considerable effort, however, the mechanisms through which FOG1 regulates gene expression are only partially understood. Here we report the discovery of a previously unrecognized domain in FOG1: a PR (PRD-BF1 and RIZ) domain that is distantly related in sequence to the SET domains that are found in many histone methyltransferases. We have used NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structure of this domain, revealing that the domain shares close structural similarity with SET domains. Titration with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, the cofactor product synonymous with SET domain methyltransferase activity, indicated that the FOG PR domain is not, however, likely to function as a methyltransferase in the same fashion. We also sought to define the function of this domain using both pulldown experiments and gel shift assays. However, neither pulldowns from mammalian nuclear extracts nor yeast two-hybrid assays reproducibly revealed binding partners, and we were unable to detect nucleic-acid-binding activity in this domain using our high-diversity Pentaprobe oligonucleotides. Overall, our data demonstrate that FOG1 is a member of the PRDM (PR domain containing proteins, with zinc fingers) family of transcriptional regulators. The function of many PR domains, however, remains somewhat enigmatic for the time being.

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