ResearchPad - pseudomonas https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[ArdC, a ssDNA-binding protein with a metalloprotease domain, overpasses the recipient <i>hsdRMS</i> restriction system broadening conjugation host range]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7739 Horizontal gene transfer is the main mechanism by which bacteria acquire and disseminate new traits, such as antibiotic resistance genes, that allow adaptation and evolution. Here we identified a gene, ardC, that enables a plasmid to increase its conjugative host range, and thus positively contributes to plasmid fitness. The crystal structure of the antirestriction protein ArdC revealed a fold different from other antirestriction proteins. Our results have wide implications for understanding how a gene enlarges the environments a plasmid can colonize and point to new targets to harness the bacterial DNA uptake control.

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<![CDATA[Blood co-expression modules identify potential modifier genes of diabetes and lung function in cystic fibrosis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N07a3560c-fa96-4eb5-821e-9292b7a2bef0

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare genetic disease that affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Lung disease is variable among CF patients and associated with the development of comorbidities and chronic infections. The rate of lung function deterioration depends not only on the type of mutations in CFTR, the disease-causing gene, but also on modifier genes. In the present study, we aimed to identify genes and pathways that (i) contribute to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis and (ii) modulate the associated comorbidities. We profiled blood samples in CF patients and healthy controls and analyzed RNA-seq data with Weighted Gene Correlation Network Analysis (WGCNA). Interestingly, lung function, body mass index, the presence of diabetes, and chronic P. aeruginosa infections correlated with four modules of co-expressed genes. Detailed inspection of networks and hub genes pointed to cell adhesion, leukocyte trafficking and production of reactive oxygen species as central mechanisms in lung function decline and cystic fibrosis-related diabetes. Of note, we showed that blood is an informative surrogate tissue to study the contribution of inflammation to lung disease and diabetes in CF patients. Finally, we provided evidence that WGCNA is useful to analyze–omic datasets in rare genetic diseases as patient cohorts are inevitably small.

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<![CDATA[Global transcriptional regulation of innate immunity by ATF-7 in C. elegans]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c784faad5eed0c4840072b2

The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a genetically tractable animal host in which to study evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of innate immune signaling. We previously showed that the PMK-1 p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulates innate immunity of C. elegans through phosphorylation of the CREB/ATF bZIP transcription factor, ATF-7. Here, we have undertaken a genomic analysis of the transcriptional response of C. elegans to infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, combining genome-wide expression analysis by RNA-seq with ATF-7 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We observe that PMK-1-ATF-7 activity regulates a majority of all genes induced by pathogen infection, and observe ATF-7 occupancy in regulatory regions of pathogen-induced genes in a PMK-1-dependent manner. Moreover, functional analysis of a subset of these ATF-7-regulated pathogen-induced target genes supports a direct role for this transcriptional response in host defense. The genome-wide regulation through PMK-1– ATF-7 signaling reveals a striking level of control over the innate immune response to infection through a single transcriptional regulator.

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<![CDATA[A rapid methods development workflow for high-throughput quantitative proteomic applications]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f152ed5eed0c48467ae98

Recent improvements in the speed and sensitivity of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have driven significant progress toward system-wide characterization of the proteome of many species. These efforts create large proteomic datasets that provide insight into biological processes and identify diagnostic proteins whose abundance changes significantly under different experimental conditions. Yet, these system-wide experiments are typically the starting point for hypothesis-driven, follow-up experiments to elucidate the extent of the phenomenon or the utility of the diagnostic marker, wherein many samples must be analyzed. Transitioning from a few discovery experiments to quantitative analyses on hundreds of samples requires significant resources both to develop sensitive and specific methods as well as analyze them in a high-throughput manner. To aid these efforts, we developed a workflow using data acquired from discovery proteomic experiments, retention time prediction, and standard-flow chromatography to rapidly develop targeted proteomic assays. We demonstrated this workflow by developing MRM assays to quantify proteins of multiple metabolic pathways from multiple microbes under different experimental conditions. With this workflow, one can also target peptides in scheduled/dynamic acquisition methods from a shotgun proteomic dataset downloaded from online repositories, validate with appropriate control samples or standard peptides, and begin analyzing hundreds of samples in only a few minutes.

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<![CDATA[Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm membrane vesicles supports multiple mechanisms of biogenesis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f151dd5eed0c48467ade7

Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs) are ubiquitous in bacterial environments and enable interactions within and between species. OMVs are observed in lab-grown and environmental biofilms, but our understanding of their function comes primarily from planktonic studies. Planktonic OMVs assist in toxin delivery, cell-cell communication, horizontal gene transfer, small RNA trafficking, and immune system evasion. Previous studies reported differences in size and proteomic cargo between planktonic and agar plate biofilm OMVs, suggesting possible differences in function between OMV types. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa interstitial biofilms, extracellular vesicles were reported to arise through cell lysis, in contrast to planktonic OMV biogenesis that involves the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS) without appreciable autolysis. Differences in biogenesis mechanism could provide a rationale for observed differences in OMV characteristics between systems. Using nanoparticle tracking, we found that P. aeruginosa PAO1 planktonic and biofilm OMVs had similar characteristics. However, P. aeruginosa PA14 OMVs were smaller, with planktonic OMVs also being smaller than their biofilm counterparts. Large differences in Staphylococcus killing ability were measured between OMVs from different strains, and a smaller within-strain difference was recorded between PA14 planktonic and biofilm OMVs. Across all conditions, the predatory ability of OMVs negatively correlated with their size. To address biogenesis mechanism, we analyzed vesicles from wild type and pqsA mutant biofilms. This showed that PQS is required for physiological-scale production of biofilm OMVs, and time-course analysis confirmed that PQS production precedes OMV production as it does in planktonic cultures. However, a small sub-population of vesicles was detected in pqsA mutant biofilms whose size distribution more resembled sonicated cell debris than wild type OMVs. These results support the idea that, while a small and unique population of vesicles in P. aeruginosa biofilms may result from cell lysis, the PQS-induced mechanism is required to generate the majority of OMVs produced by wild type communities.

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<![CDATA[C4-HSL aptamers for blocking qurom sensing and inhibiting biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its structure prediction and analysis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c75abffd5eed0c484d07f98

This study aimed to screen DNA aptamers against the signal molecule C4-HSL of the rhl system for the inhibition of biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using an improved systematic evolution of ligand by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method based on a structure-switching fluorescent activating bead. The aptamers against the C4-HSL with a high affinity and specifity were successfully obtained and evaluated in real-time by this method. Results of biofilm inhibition experiments in vitro showed that the biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa was efficiently reduced to about 1/3 by the aptamers compared with that of the groups without the aptamers. Independent secondary structure simulation and computer-aided tertiary structure prediction (3dRNA) showed that the aptamers contained a highly conserved Y-shaped structural unit. Therefore, this study benefits the search for new methods for the detection and treatment of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation.

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<![CDATA[Accelerated bacterial detection in blood culture by enhanced acoustic flow cytometry (AFC) following peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH)]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6730b6d5eed0c484f37f63

Bacteraemia is a risk factor for subsequent clinical deterioration and death. Current reliance on culture-based methods for detection of bacteraemia delays identification and assessment of this risk until after the optimal period for positively impacting treatment decisions has passed. Therefore, a method for rapid detection and identification of bacterial infection in the peripheral bloodstream in acutely ill patients is crucial for improved patient survival through earlier targeted antibiotic treatment. The turnaround time for current clinical laboratory methods ranges from 12 to 48 hours, emphasizing the need for a faster diagnostic test. Here we describe a novel assay for accelerated generic detection of bacteria in blood culture (BC) using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization enhanced acoustic flow cytometry (PNA-FISH-AFC). For assay development, we used simulated blood cultures (BCs) spiked with one of three bacterial species at a low starting concentration of 10 CFU/mL: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Under current clinical settings, it takes a minimum of 12 hours incubation to reach positivity on the BacTEC system, corresponding to a bacterial concentration of 107−109 CFU/mL optimal for further analyses. In contrast, our PNA-FISH-AFC assay detected 103–104 CFU/mL bacteria in BC following a much shorter culture incubation of 5 to 10 hours. Using either PCR-based FilmArray assay or MALDI-TOF for bacterial detection, it took 7–10 and 12–24 hours of incubation, respectively, to reach the positive result. These findings indicate a potential time advantage of PNA-FISH-AFC assay for rapid bacterial detection in BC with significantly improved turnaround time over currently used laboratory techniques.

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<![CDATA[Targeted lipopolysaccharide biosynthetic intermediate analysis with normal-phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6730d1d5eed0c484f38198

Lipopolysacharride (LPS) forms the outer leaflet of the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria and contributes to the permeability barrier and immune response. In this study, we established a method for monitoring the LPS biosynthetic intermediates of the Raetz pathway (lpxA-lpxK) in Escherichia coli. Metabolites from compound-treated cells and genetically-perturbed cells were extracted from whole cells and concentrated by mixed-mode weak anion exchange (WAX) solid-phase extraction (SPE) prior to analysis by normal phase (NP)LC-MS/MS. Data was normalized to cell density and an internal standard prior to comparison against untreated cells in order to determine fold accumulation and depletion for affected metabolites. Using this LC-MS/MS method, we were able to reliably monitor changes in levels of the LPS intermediates in response to compound-treatment and genetic modification. In addition, we found that deletion of periplasmic CDP-diacylglycerol pyrophosphatase dramatically increased levels of the UDP-containing LPS intermediates, suggesting the enzymatic breakdown during sample preparation. This assay allows for probing a key essential pathway in Gram-negative bacteria in an effort to discover antibacterial agents that inhibit enzymes in the LPS biosynthetic pathway.

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<![CDATA[Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus c-di-AMP cyclase DacA by direct interaction with the phosphoglucosamine mutase GlmM]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c50c481d5eed0c4845e8843

c-di-AMP is an important second messenger molecule that plays a pivotal role in regulating fundamental cellular processes, including osmotic and cell wall homeostasis in many Gram-positive organisms. In the opportunistic human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, c-di-AMP is produced by the membrane-anchored DacA enzyme. Inactivation of this enzyme leads to a growth arrest under standard laboratory growth conditions and a re-sensitization of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains to ß-lactam antibiotics. The gene coding for DacA is part of the conserved three-gene dacA/ybbR/glmM operon that also encodes the proposed DacA regulator YbbR and the essential phosphoglucosamine mutase GlmM, which is required for the production of glucosamine-1-phosphate, an early intermediate of peptidoglycan synthesis. These three proteins are thought to form a complex in vivo and, in this manner, help to fine-tune the cellular c-di-AMP levels. To further characterize this important regulatory complex, we conducted a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of the S. aureus DacA and GlmM enzymes by determining the structures of the S. aureus GlmM enzyme and the catalytic domain of DacA. Both proteins were found to be dimers in solution as well as in the crystal structures. Further site-directed mutagenesis, structural and enzymatic studies showed that multiple DacA dimers need to interact for enzymatic activity. We also show that DacA and GlmM form a stable complex in vitro and that S. aureus GlmM, but not Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa GlmM, acts as a strong inhibitor of DacA function without the requirement of any additional cellular factor. Based on Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) data, a model of the complex revealed that GlmM likely inhibits DacA by masking the active site of the cyclase and preventing higher oligomer formation. Together these results provide an important mechanistic insight into how c-di-AMP production can be regulated in the cell.

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<![CDATA[Flow cytometry, a powerful novel tool to rapidly assess bacterial viability in metal working fluids: Proof-of-principle]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5df33bd5eed0c484580f75

Metalworking fluids (MWF) are water- or oil-based liquids to cool and lubricate tools, work pieces and machines, inhibit corrosion and remove swarf. One of the major problems in the MWF industry is bacterial growth as bacterial enzymes can cause MWF degradation. In addition, bacteria can form biofilms which hamper the functioning of machines. Last but not least, some bacterial by-products are toxic (e.g. endotoxins) and present potential health risks for metalworking machine operators via the formation of aerosols. Therefore, a novel fast yet accurate analytical method to evaluate and predict the antibacterial capacity of MWF would be an important asset. As such a tool is currently lacking, the present study aimed to develop a protocol based on flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the antibacterial potential of newly developed MWF independent of bacterial growth. Results of this novel method were compared to a biochallenge test currently used in MWF industry and also to traditional plate counts. Our results represent a proof-of-principle that FCM can reliably predict the antibacterial capacity of MWF already within one day of incubation with Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis, being substantially faster than the current growth-based methods.

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<![CDATA[Nontherapeutic equivalence of a generic product of imipenem-cilastatin is caused more by chemical instability of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (imipenem) than by its substandard amount of cilastatin]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c648cbfd5eed0c484c81696

Background

We demonstrated therapeutic nonequivalence of “bioequivalent” generics for meropenem, but there is no data with generics of other carbapenems.

Methods

One generic product of imipenem-cilastatin was compared with the innovator in terms of in vitro susceptibility testing, pharmaceutical equivalence, pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) equivalence in the neutropenic mouse thigh, lung and brain infection models. Both pharmaceutical forms were then subjected to analytical chemistry assays (LC/MS).

Results and conclusion

The generic product had 30% lower concentration of cilastatin compared with the innovator of imipenem-cilastatin. Regarding the active pharmaceutical ingredient (imipenem), we found no differences in MIC, MBC, concentration or potency or AUC, confirming equivalence in terms of in vitro activity. However, the generic failed therapeutic equivalence in all three animal models. Its Emax against S. aureus in the thigh model was consistently lower, killing from 0.1 to 7.3 million less microorganisms per gram in 24 hours than the innovator (P = 0.003). Against K. pneumoniae in the lung model, the generic exhibited a conspicuous Eagle effect fitting a Gaussian equation instead of the expected sigmoid curve of the Hill model. In the brain infection model with P. aeruginosa, the generic failed when bacterial growth was >4 log10 CFU/g in 24 hours, but not if it was less than 2.5 log10 CFU/g. These large differences in the PD profile cannot be explained by the lower concentration of cilastatin, and rather suggested a failure attributable to the imipenem constituent of the generic product. Analytical chemistry assays confirmed that, besides having 30% less cilastatin, the generic imipenem was more acidic, less stable, and exhibited four different degradation masses that were absent in the innovator.

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<![CDATA[R pyocin tail fiber structure reveals a receptor-binding domain with a lectin fold]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c633948d5eed0c484ae63f5

R pyocins are ɸCTX-like myophage tailocins of Pseudomonas sp. Adsorption of R pyocins to target strains occurs by the interaction of tail fiber proteins with core lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we demonstrate that N-terminally truncated R pyocin tail fibers corresponding to a region of variation between R-subtypes are sufficient to bind target strains according to R-subtype. We also report the crystal structures of these tail fiber proteins and show that they form an elongated helical trimer composed of three domains arranged linearly from N- to C-terminus: a baseplate proximal head, medial shaft, and distal foot. The head and shaft domains contain novel structural motifs. The foot domain, however, is composed of a conserved jellyroll fold and shares high structural similarity to the tail fiber of myophage AP22, podophage tailspike C-terminal domains (LKA-1 and ɸ297), and several eukaryotic adhesins (discoidin I/II, agglutinin, and octocoral lectin). Many of these proteins bind polysaccharides by means of their distal loop network, a series of highly variable loops at one end of the conserved jellyroll fold backbone. Our structures reveal that the majority of R-subtype specific polymorphisms cluster in patches covering a cleft formed at the oligomeric interface of the head domain and in a large patch covering much of the foot domain, including the distal loop network. Based on the structural variation in distal loops within the foot region, we propose that the foot is the primary sugar-binding domain of R pyocins and R-subtype specific structural differences in the foot domain distal loop network are responsible for binding target strains in an R-subtype dependent manner.

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<![CDATA[TLR4-interacting SPA4 peptide improves host defense and alleviates tissue injury in a mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c58d662d5eed0c484031d4e

Interaction between surfactant protein-A (SP-A) and toll-like receptor (TLR)4 plays a critical role in host defense. In this work, we studied the host defense function of SPA4 peptide (amino acids GDFRYSDGTPVNYTNWYRGE), derived from the TLR4-interacting region of SP-A, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We determined the binding of SPA4 peptide to live bacteria, and its direct antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. Pro-phagocytic and anti-inflammatory effects were investigated in JAWS II dendritic cells and primary alveolar macrophages. The biological relevance of SPA4 peptide was evaluated in a mouse model of acute lung infection induced by intratracheal challenge with P. aeruginosa. Our results demonstrate that the SPA4 peptide does not interact with or kill P. aeruginosa when cultured outside the host. The SPA4 peptide treatment induces the uptake and localization of bacteria in the phagolysosomes of immune cells. At the same time, the secreted amounts of TNF-α are significantly reduced in cell-free supernatants of SPA4 peptide-treated cells. In cells overexpressing TLR4, the TLR4-induced phagocytic response is maintained, but the levels of TLR4-stimulated TNF-α are reduced. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the therapeutic administration of SPA4 peptide reduces bacterial burden, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, intracellular signaling, and lactate levels, and alleviates lung edema and tissue damage in P. aeruginosa-infected mice. Together, our results suggest that the treatment with SPA4 peptide can help control the bacterial burden, inflammation, and tissue injury in a P. aeruginosa lung infection model.

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<![CDATA[Bronchiectasis in patients hospitalized with acute exacerbation of COPD in Spain: Influence on mortality, hospital stay, and hospital costs (2006-2014) according to gender]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e6b4d5eed0c484ef3bf5

Purpose

The objectives of this study were to analyze the characteristics of male and female patients hospitalized with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE-COPD) during 2006–2014 according to the presence or absence of bronchiectasis and to study the factors associated with in-hospital mortality (IHM) in patients hospitalized with AE-COPD and concomitant bronchiectasis.

Methods

We used the Spanish National Hospital Database to analyze patients admitted with AE-COPD as their primary diagnosis. Patients included in the study were stratified according to the presence or absence of bronchiectasis as their secondary diagnosis.

Results

We identified 386,646 admissions for AE-COPD, of which 19,679 (5.09%) involved patients with concomitant bronchiectasis. When patients with and without bronchiectasis were compared, we observed that the incidence of infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was substantially higher in the former, as were the mean stay, cost, and percentage of readmissions, although IHM and comorbidity were lower. The course of patients with AE-COPD and bronchiectasis was characterized by a gradual increase in prevalence and mean age among men and no differences in prevalence or lower mean age in women. Mortality was 4.24% and 5.02% in patients with and without bronchiectasis, respectively, although significance was lost after a multivariate adjustment (OR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88–1.01). The factors associated with IHM were older age, higher comorbidity, isolation of P. aeruginosa, mechanical ventilation and readmission.

Conclusions

The prevalence of admission with AE-COPD and bronchiectasis increased in men but not in women during the study period. In patients hospitalized with AE-COPD, we did not find differences in mortality when comparing the presence and absence of bronchiectasis. The analysis of temporal trends revealed a significant reduction in mortality from 2006 to 2014 in male patients with COPD and concomitant bronchiectasis, but not among women. It is important to consider the factors associated with IHM such as age, comorbidity, isolation of P. aeruginosa, mechanical ventilation and readmission to better identify those patients who are at greater risk of dying during hospitalization.

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<![CDATA[The nuclear hormone receptor NHR-86 controls anti-pathogen responses in C. elegans]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c50c466d5eed0c4845e86e5

Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are ligand-gated transcription factors that control adaptive host responses following recognition of specific endogenous or exogenous ligands. Although NHRs have expanded dramatically in C. elegans compared to other metazoans, the biological function of only a few of these genes has been characterized in detail. Here, we demonstrate that an NHR can activate an anti-pathogen transcriptional program. Using genetic epistasis experiments, transcriptome profiling analyses and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing, we show that, in the presence of an immunostimulatory small molecule, NHR-86 binds to the promoters of immune effectors to activate their transcription. NHR-86 is not required for resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa at baseline, but activation of NHR-86 by this compound drives a transcriptional program that provides protection against this pathogen. Interestingly, NHR-86 targets immune effectors whose basal regulation requires the canonical p38 MAPK PMK-1 immune pathway. However, NHR-86 functions independently of PMK-1 and modulates the transcription of these infection response genes directly. These findings characterize a new transcriptional regulator in C. elegans that can induce a protective host response towards a bacterial pathogen.

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<![CDATA[Tobramycin reduces key virulence determinants in the proteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane vesicles]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e695d5eed0c484ef385a

Tobramycin is commonly used to treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Tobramycin treatment leads to increased lung function and fewer clinical exacerbations in CF patients, and modestly reduces the density of P. aeruginosa in the lungs. P. aeruginosa resides primarily in the mucus overlying lung epithelial cells and secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that diffuse through the mucus and fuse with airway epithelial cells, thus delivering virulence factors into the cytoplasm that modify the innate immune response. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that Tobramycin reduces the abundance of virulence factors in OMVs secreted by P. aeruginosa. Characterization of the proteome of OMVs isolated from control or Tobramycin-exposed P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 revealed that Tobramycin reduced several OMV-associated virulence determinants, including AprA, an alkaline protease that enhances P. aeruginosa survival in the lung, and is predicted to contribute to the inhibitory effect of P. aeruginosa on Phe508del-CFTR Cl- secretion by primary human bronchial epithelial cells. Deletion of the gene encoding AprA reduced the inhibitory effect of P. aeruginosa on Phe508del-CFTR Cl- secretion. Moreover, as predicted by our proteomic analysis, OMVs isolated from Tobramycin treated P. aeruginosa had a diminished inhibitory effect on Phe508del-CFTR Cl- secretion compared to OMVs isolated from control P. aeruginosa. Taken together, our proteomic analysis of OMVs and biological validation suggest that Tobramycin may improve lung function in CF patients infected with P. aeruginosa by reducing several key virulence factors in OMVs that reduce CFTR Cl- secretion, which is essential for bacterial clearance from the lungs.

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<![CDATA[Sugar and iron: Toward understanding the antibacterial effect of ciclopirox in Escherichia coli]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c42438cd5eed0c4845e0573

New antibiotics are needed against antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria. The repurposed antifungal drug, ciclopirox, equally blocks antibiotic-susceptible or multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates, indicating that it is not affected by existing resistance mechanisms. Toward understanding how ciclopirox blocks growth, we screened E. coli mutant strains and found that disruption of genes encoding products involved in galactose salvage, enterobacterial common antigen synthesis, and transport of the iron binding siderophore, enterobactin, lowered the minimum inhibitory concentration of ciclopirox needed to block growth of the mutant compared to the isogenic parent strain. We found that ciclopirox induced enterobactin production and that this effect is strongly affected by the deletion of the galactose salvage genes encoding UDP-galactose 4-epimerase, galE, or galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, galT. As disruption of ECA synthesis activates the regulation of capsular synthesis (Rcs) phosphorelay, which inhibits bacterial swarming and promotes biofilm development, we test whether ciclopirox prevents activation of the Rcs pathway. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of ciclopirox increased swarming of the E. coli laboratory K12 strain BW25113 but had widely varying effects on swarming or surface motility of clinical isolate E. coli, A. baumannii, and K. pneumoniae. There was no effect of ciclopirox on biofilm production, suggesting it does not target Rcs. Altogether, our data suggest ciclopirox-mediated alteration of lipopolysaccharides stimulates enterobactin production and affects bacterial swarming.

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<![CDATA[Alemtuzumab induction combined with reduced maintenance immunosuppression is associated with improved outcomes after lung transplantation: A single centre experience]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c478c9dd5eed0c484bd36c6

Question addressed by the study

The value of induction therapy in lung transplantation is controversial. According to the ISHLT, only about 50% of patients transplanted within the last 10 years received induction therapy. We reviewed our institutional experience to investigate the impact of induction therapy on short- and long-term outcomes.

Materials/Patients and methods

Between 2007 and 2015, 446 patients with a complete follow-up were included in this retrospective analysis. Analysis comprised long-term kidney function, infectious complications, incidence of rejection and overall survival.

Results

A total of 231 patients received alemtuzumab, 50 patients antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and 165 patients did not receive induction therapy (NI). The alemtuzumab group revealed the lowest rate of chronic kidney insufficiency (NI: 52.2%; ATG: 60%; alemtuzumab: 36.6%; p = 0.001). Both, the NI group (p<0.001) and the ATG group (p = 0.010) showed a significant increase of serum creatinine during follow-up compared to alemtuzumab patients. Furthermore, alemtuzumab group experienced the lowest rate of infection in the first year after transplantation. Finally, improved survival, low rates of acute cellular rejection (ACR), lymphocytic bronchiolitis (LB) and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) were found in patients treated either with alemtuzumab or ATG.

Conclusion

Alemtuzumab induction therapy followed by reduced maintenance immunosuppression is associated with a better kidney function compared to no induction and ATG. Survival rate as well as freedom from ACR and CLAD were comparable between alemtuzumab and ATG.

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<![CDATA[Clinical and microbiological characteristics of cystic fibrosis adults never colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Analysis of the French CF registry]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c3e5023d5eed0c484d7de0a

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main cause of chronic airway infection in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, for unclear reasons some patients are never colonized by P. aeruginosa. The objectives of this study were to better define the clinical, genetic, and microbiological characteristics of such a subpopulation and to identify predictive factors of non-colonization with P. aeruginosa. The French CF patient registry 2013–2014 was used to identify CF patients aged ≥ 20 years. The clinical outcomes, CF Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) genotypes, and microbiological data of patients reported positive at least once for P. aeruginosa (“Pyo” group, n = 1,827) were compared to those of patients with no history of P. aeruginosa isolation (“Never” group, n = 303). Predictive factors of non-colonization by P. aeruginosa were identified by multivariate logistic regression model with backward selection. Absence of aspergillosis (odds ratio (OR) [95% CI] = 1.64 [1.01–2.66]), absence of diabetes (2.25 [1.21–4.18]), pancreatic sufficiency (1.81 [1.30–2.52]), forced expiratory volume 1 (FEV1) ≥ 80% (3.03 [2.28–4.03]), older age at CF diagnosis (1.03 [1.02–1.04]), and absence of F508del/F508del genotype (2.17 [1.48–3.19]) were predictive clinical factors associated with absence of infection (“Never” group). Microbiologically, this same group was associated with more frequent detection of Haemophilus influenzae and lower rates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Aspergillus spp. (all p<0.01) in sputum. This study strongly suggests that the absence of pulmonary colonization by P. aeruginosa in a minority of CF adults (14.2%) is associated with a milder form of the disease. Recent progress in the development of drugs to correct CFTR deficiency thus may be decisive in the control of P. aeruginosa lung infection.

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<![CDATA[Integrative network-centric approach reveals signaling pathways associated with plant resistance and susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c1ab846d5eed0c484027628

Plant protein kinases form redundant signaling pathways to perceive microbial pathogens and activate immunity. Bacterial pathogens repress cellular immune responses by secreting effectors, some of which bind and inhibit multiple host kinases. To understand how broadly bacterial effectors may bind protein kinases and the function of these kinase interactors, we first tested kinase–effector (K-E) interactions using the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato–tomato pathosystem. We tested interactions between five individual effectors (HopAI1, AvrPto, HopA1, HopM1, and HopAF1) and 279 tomato kinases in tomato cells. Over half of the tested kinases interacted with at least one effector, and 48% of these kinases interacted with more than three effectors, suggesting a role in the defense. Next, we characterized the role of select multi-effector–interacting kinases and revealed their roles in basal resistance, effector-triggered immunity (ETI), or programmed cell death (PCD). The immune function of several of these kinases was only detectable in the presence of effectors, suggesting that these kinases are critical when particular cell functions are perturbed or that their role is typically masked. To visualize the kinase networks underlying the cellular responses, we derived signal-specific networks. A comparison of the networks revealed a limited overlap between ETI and basal immunity networks. In addition, the basal immune network complexity increased when exposed to some of the effectors. The networks were used to successfully predict the role of a new set of kinases in basal immunity. Our work indicates the complexity of the larger kinase-based defense network and demonstrates how virulence- and avirulence-associated bacterial effectors alter sectors of the defense network.

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