ResearchPad - pseudomonas-putida https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[ArdC, a ssDNA-binding protein with a metalloprotease domain, overpasses the recipient <i>hsdRMS</i> restriction system broadening conjugation host range]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_7739 Horizontal gene transfer is the main mechanism by which bacteria acquire and disseminate new traits, such as antibiotic resistance genes, that allow adaptation and evolution. Here we identified a gene, ardC, that enables a plasmid to increase its conjugative host range, and thus positively contributes to plasmid fitness. The crystal structure of the antirestriction protein ArdC revealed a fold different from other antirestriction proteins. Our results have wide implications for understanding how a gene enlarges the environments a plasmid can colonize and point to new targets to harness the bacterial DNA uptake control.

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<![CDATA[A rapid methods development workflow for high-throughput quantitative proteomic applications]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f152ed5eed0c48467ae98

Recent improvements in the speed and sensitivity of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have driven significant progress toward system-wide characterization of the proteome of many species. These efforts create large proteomic datasets that provide insight into biological processes and identify diagnostic proteins whose abundance changes significantly under different experimental conditions. Yet, these system-wide experiments are typically the starting point for hypothesis-driven, follow-up experiments to elucidate the extent of the phenomenon or the utility of the diagnostic marker, wherein many samples must be analyzed. Transitioning from a few discovery experiments to quantitative analyses on hundreds of samples requires significant resources both to develop sensitive and specific methods as well as analyze them in a high-throughput manner. To aid these efforts, we developed a workflow using data acquired from discovery proteomic experiments, retention time prediction, and standard-flow chromatography to rapidly develop targeted proteomic assays. We demonstrated this workflow by developing MRM assays to quantify proteins of multiple metabolic pathways from multiple microbes under different experimental conditions. With this workflow, one can also target peptides in scheduled/dynamic acquisition methods from a shotgun proteomic dataset downloaded from online repositories, validate with appropriate control samples or standard peptides, and begin analyzing hundreds of samples in only a few minutes.

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<![CDATA[Expression of the sRNAs CrcZ and CrcY modulate the strength of carbon catabolite repression under diazotrophic or non-diazotrophic growing conditions in Azotobacter vinelandii]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c1c0ae7d5eed0c484426e0d

Azotobacter vinelandii is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium of the Pseudomonadaceae family that prefers the use of organic acids rather than carbohydrates. Thus, in a mixture of acetate-glucose, glucose is consumed only after acetate is exhausted. In a previous work, we investigated the molecular basis of this carbon catabolite repression (CCR) process under diazotrophic conditions. In the presence of acetate, Crc-Hfq inhibited translation of the gluP mRNA, encoding the glucose transporter in A. vinelandii. Herein, we investigated the regulation in the expression of the small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) crcZ and crcY, which are known to antagonize the repressing activity of Hfq-Crc. Our results indicated higher expression levels of the sRNAs crcZ and crcY under low CCR conditions (i.e. glucose), in relation to the strong one (acetate one). In addition, we also explored the process of CCR in the presence of ammonium. Our results revealed that CCR also occurs under non-diazotrophic conditions as we detected a hierarchy in the utilization of the supplied carbon sources, which was consistent with the higher expression level of the crcZ/Y sRNAs during glucose catabolism. Analysis of the promoters driving transcription of crcZ and crcY confirmed that they were RpoN-dependent but we also detected a processed form of CrcZ (CrcZ*) in the RpoN-deficient strain derived from a cbrB-crcZ co-transcript. CrcZ* was functional and sufficient to allow the assimilation of acetate.

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<![CDATA[LapF and Its Regulation by Fis Affect the Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e6ab0ee8fa60b6b59b

The ability of bacteria to regulate cell surface hydrophobicity is important for the adaptation to different environmental conditions. The hydrophobicity of cell surface can be determined by several factors, including outer membrane and surface proteins. In this study, we report that an adhesin LapF influences cell surface hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida. Cells lacking LapF are less hydrophobic than wild-type cells in stationary growth phase. Moreover, the overexpression of the global regulator Fis decreases surface hydrophobicity by repressing the expression of lapF. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that bacteria producing LapF are more viable when confronted with methanol (a hydrophilic compound) but are more susceptible to 1-octanol (a hydrophobic compound). Thus, these results revealed that LapF is the hydrophobicity factor for the cell surface of P. putida.

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<![CDATA[Characterization of MazF-Mediated Sequence-Specific RNA Cleavage in Pseudomonas putida Using Massive Parallel Sequencing]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da31ab0ee8fa60b849d2

Under environmental stress, microbes are known to alter their translation patterns using sequence-specific endoribonucleases that we call RNA interferases. However, there has been limited insight regarding which RNAs are specifically cleaved by these RNA interferases, hence their physiological functions remain unknown. In the current study, we developed a novel method to effectively identify cleavage specificities with massive parallel sequencing. This approach uses artificially designed RNAs composed of diverse sequences, which do not form extensive secondary structures, and it correctly identified the cleavage sequence of a well-characterized Escherichia coli RNA interferase, MazF, as ACA. In addition, we also determined that an uncharacterized MazF homologue isolated from Pseudomonas putida specifically recognizes the unique triplet, UAC. Using a real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay, the UAC triplet was further proved to be essential for cleavage in P. putida MazF. These results highlight an effective method to determine cleavage specificity of RNA interferases.

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<![CDATA[p-Cymene Promotes Its Catabolism through the p-Cymene and the p-Cumate Pathways, Activates a Stress Response and Reduces the Biofilm Formation in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db32ab0ee8fa60bd21b4

p-Cymene is an aromatic terpene that is present in diverse plant species. The aims of this study were to study the p-cymene metabolism in the model aromatic-degrading bacterium Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, and its response to p-cymene. The catabolic p-cymene (cym) and p-cumate (cmt) genes are clustered on the LB400 major chromosome. B. xenovorans LB400 was able to grow on p-cymene as well as on p-cumate as a sole carbon and energy sources. LB400 growth attained higher cell concentration at stationary phase on p-cumate than on p-cymene. The transcription of the key cymAb and cmtAb genes, and p-cumate dioxygenase activity were observed in LB400 cells grown on p-cymene and on p-cumate, but not in glucose-grown cells. Diverse changes on LB400 proteome were observed in p-cymene-grown cells compared to glucose-grown cells. An increase of the molecular chaperones DnaK, GroEL and ClpB, the organic hydroperoxide resistance protein Ohr, the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase AhpC and the copper oxidase CopA during growth on p-cymene strongly suggests that the exposure to p-cymene constitutes a stress condition for strain LB400. Diverse proteins of the energy metabolism such as enolase, pyruvate kinase, aconitase AcnA, succinyl-CoA synthetase beta subunit and ATP synthase beta subunit were induced by p-cymene. Electron microscopy showed that p-cymene-grown cells exhibited fuzzy outer and inner membranes and an increased periplasm. p-Cymene induced diverse membrane and transport proteins including the p-cymene transporter CymD. Biofilm formation was reduced during growth in p-cymene in strain LB400 compared to glucose-grown cells that may be associated with a decrease of diguanylate cyclase protein levels. Overall, these results indicate active p-cymene and p-cumate catabolic pathways in B. xenovorans LB400. In addition, this study showed that p-cymene activated a stress response in strain LB400 and reduced its biofilm formation.

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<![CDATA[Complex Interplay between FleQ, Cyclic Diguanylate and Multiple σ Factors Coordinately Regulates Flagellar Motility and Biofilm Development in Pseudomonas putida]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da3fab0ee8fa60b8951b

Most bacteria alternate between a free living planktonic lifestyle and the formation of structured surface-associated communities named biofilms. The transition between these two lifestyles requires a precise and timely regulation of the factors involved in each of the stages that has been likened to a developmental process. Here we characterize the involvement of the transcriptional regulator FleQ and the second messenger cyclic diguanylate in the coordinate regulation of multiple functions related to motility and surface colonization in Pseudomonas putida. Disruption of fleQ caused strong defects in flagellar motility, biofilm formation and surface attachment, and the ability of this mutation to suppress multiple biofilm-related phenotypes associated to cyclic diguanylate overproduction suggests that FleQ mediates cyclic diguanylate signaling critical to biofilm growth. We have constructed a library containing 94 promoters potentially involved in motility and biofilm development fused to gfp and lacZ, screened this library for FleQ and cyclic diguanylate regulation, and assessed the involvement of alternative σ factors σN and FliA in the transcription of FleQ-regulated promoters. Our results suggest a dual mode of action for FleQ. Low cyclic diguanylate levels favor FleQ interaction with σN-dependent promoters to activate the flagellar cascade, encompassing the flagellar cluster and additional genes involved in cyclic diguanylate metabolism, signal transduction and gene regulation. On the other hand, characterization of the FleQ-regulated σN- and FliA-independent PlapA and PbcsD promoters revealed two disparate regulatory mechanisms leading to a similar outcome: the synthesis of biofilm matrix components in response to increased cyclic diguanylate levels.

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<![CDATA[Pathogen cross-transmission via building sanitary plumbing systems in a full scale pilot test-rig]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4fab0ee8fa60bdbacb

The WHO Consensus Document on the epidemiology of the SARS epidemic in 2003, included a report on a concentrated outbreak in one Hong Kong housing block which was considered a ‘super-spreading event’. The WHO report conjectured that the sanitary plumbing system was one transmission route for the virus. Empty U-traps allowed the aerosolised virus to enter households from the sewerage system. No biological evidence was presented. This research reports evidence that pathogens can be aerosolised and transported on airstreams within sanitary plumbing systems and enter buildings via empty U-traps. A sanitary plumbing system was built, representing two floors of a building, with simulated toilet flushes on the lower floor and a sterile chamber with extractor fan on the floor above. Cultures of a model organism, Pseudomonas putida at 106–109 cfu ml-1 in 0·85% NaCl were flushed into the system in volumes of 6 to 20 litres to represent single or multiple toilet flushes. Air and surface samples were cultured on agar plates and assessed qualitatively and semi-quantitatively. Flushing from a toilet into a sanitary plumbing system generated enough turbulence to aerosolise pathogens. Typical sanitary plumbing system airflows (between 20–30 ls-1) were sufficient to carry aerosolised pathogens between different floors of a building. Empty U-traps allowed aerosolised pathogens to enter the chamber, encouraging cross-transmission. All parts of the system were found to be contaminated post-flush. Empty U-traps have been observed in many buildings and a risk assessment indicates the potential for high risk cross-transmission under defect conditions in buildings with high pathogen loading such as hospitals. Under defective conditions (which are not uncommon) aerosolised pathogens can be carried on the airflows within sanitary plumbing systems. Our findings show that greater consideration should be given to this mode of pathogen transmission.

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<![CDATA[Pathway-Consensus Approach to Metabolic Network Reconstruction for Pseudomonas putida KT2440 by Systematic Comparison of Published Models]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db00ab0ee8fa60bc652a

Over 100 genome-scale metabolic networks (GSMNs) have been published in recent years and widely used for phenotype prediction and pathway design. However, GSMNs for a specific organism reconstructed by different research groups usually produce inconsistent simulation results, which makes it difficult to use the GSMNs for precise optimal pathway design. Therefore, it is necessary to compare and identify the discrepancies among networks and build a consensus metabolic network for an organism. Here we proposed a process for systematic comparison of metabolic networks at pathway level. We compared four published GSMNs of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and identified the discrepancies leading to inconsistent pathway calculation results. The mistakes in the models were corrected based on information from literature so that all the calculated synthesis and uptake pathways were the same. Subsequently we built a pathway-consensus model and then further updated it with the latest genome annotation information to obtain modelPpuQY1140 for P. putida KT2440, which includes 1140 genes, 1171 reactions and 1104 metabolites. We found that even small errors in a GSMN could have great impacts on the calculated optimal pathways and thus may lead to incorrect pathway design strategies. Careful investigation of the calculated pathways during the metabolic network reconstruction process is essential for building proper GSMNs for pathway design.

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<![CDATA[Molecular Cloning and Functional Expression of a Δ9- Fatty Acid Desaturase from an Antarctic Pseudomonas sp. A3]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dafcab0ee8fa60bc51f0

Fatty acid desaturase enzymes play an essential role in the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids. Pseudomonas sp. A3 was found to produce a large amount of palmitoleic and oleic acids after incubation at low temperatures. Using polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), a novel Δ9- fatty acid desaturase gene was isolated, cloned, and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene was designated as PA3FAD9 and has an open reading frame of 1,185 bp which codes for 394 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 45 kDa. The activity of the gene product was confirmed via GCMS, which showed a functional putative Δ9-fatty acid desaturase capable of increasing the total amount of cellular unsaturated fatty acids of the E. coli cells expressing the gene. The results demonstrate that the cellular palmitoleic acids have increased two-fold upon expression at 15°C using only 0.1 mM IPTG. Therefore, PA3FAD9 from Pseudomonas sp.A3 codes for a Δ9-fatty acid desaturase-like protein which was actively expressed in E. coli.

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<![CDATA[Strategy of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes C70 for effective degradation of phenol and salicylate]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbdd3

Phenol- and naphthalene-degrading indigenous Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes strain C70 has great potential for the bioremediation of polluted areas. It harbours two chromosomally located catechol meta pathways, one of which is structurally and phylogenetically very similar to the Pseudomonas sp. CF600 dmp operon and the other to the P. stutzeri AN10 nah lower operon. The key enzymes of the catechol meta pathway, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) from strain C70, PheB and NahH, have an amino acid identity of 85%. The metabolic and regulatory phenotypes of the wild-type and the mutant strain C70ΔpheB lacking pheB were evaluated. qRT-PCR data showed that in C70, the expression of pheB- and nahH-encoded C23O was induced by phenol and salicylate, respectively. We demonstrate that strain C70 is more effective in the degradation of phenol and salicylate, especially at higher substrate concentrations, when these compounds are present as a mixture; i.e., when both pathways are expressed. Moreover, NahH is able to substitute for the deleted PheB in phenol degradation when salicylate is also present in the growth medium. The appearance of a yellow intermediate 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde was followed by the accumulation of catechol in salicylate-containing growth medium, and lower expression levels and specific activities of the C23O of the sal operon were detected. However, the excretion of the toxic intermediate catechol to the growth medium was avoided when the growth medium was supplemented with phenol, seemingly due to the contribution of the second meta pathway encoded by the phe genes.

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<![CDATA[DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db53ab0ee8fa60bdccdf

Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis.

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<![CDATA[Inferring the Chemotactic Strategy of P. putida and E. coli Using Modified Kramers-Moyal Coefficients]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db54ab0ee8fa60bdd0d4

Many bacteria perform a run-and-tumble random walk to explore their surrounding and to perform chemotaxis. In this article we present a novel method to infer the relevant parameters of bacterial motion from experimental trajectories including the tumbling events. We introduce a stochastic model for the orientation angle, where a shot-noise process initiates tumbles, and analytically calculate conditional moments, reminiscent of Kramers-Moyal coefficients. Matching them with the moments calculated from experimental trajectories of the bacteria E. coli and Pseudomonas putida, we are able to infer their respective tumble rates, the rotational diffusion constants, and the distributions of tumble angles in good agreement with results from conventional tumble recognizers. We also define a novel tumble recognizer, which explicitly quantifies the error in recognizing tumbles. In the presence of a chemical gradient we condition the moments on the bacterial direction of motion and thereby explore the chemotaxis strategy. For both bacteria we recover and quantify the classical chemotactic strategy, where the tumble rate is smallest along the chemical gradient. In addition, for E. coli we detect some cells, which bias their mean tumble angle towards smaller values. Our findings are supported by a scaling analysis of appropriate ratios of conditional moments, which are directly calculated from experimental data.

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<![CDATA[Efficient Reconstruction of Predictive Consensus Metabolic Network Models]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da20ab0ee8fa60b7e8a2

Understanding cellular function requires accurate, comprehensive representations of metabolism. Genome-scale, constraint-based metabolic models (GSMs) provide such representations, but their usability is often hampered by inconsistencies at various levels, in particular for concurrent models. COMMGEN, our tool for COnsensus Metabolic Model GENeration, automatically identifies inconsistencies between concurrent models and semi-automatically resolves them, thereby contributing to consolidate knowledge of metabolic function. Tests of COMMGEN for four organisms showed that automatically generated consensus models were predictive and that they substantially increased coherence of knowledge representation. COMMGEN ought to be particularly useful for complex scenarios in which manual curation does not scale, such as for eukaryotic organisms, microbial communities, and host-pathogen interactions.

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<![CDATA[Pseudomonas putida Fis Binds to the lapF Promoter In Vitro and Represses the Expression of LapF]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f0ab0ee8fa60b6e25d

The biofilm matrix of the rhizospheric bacterium Pseudomonas putida consists mainly of a proteinaceous component. The two largest P. putida proteins, adhesins LapA and LapF, are involved in biofilm development but prevail in different developmental stages of the biofilm matrix. LapA is abundant in the initial stage of biofilm formation whereas LapF is found in the mature biofilm. Although the transcriptional regulation of the adhesins is not exhaustively studied, some factors that can be involved in their regulation have been described. For example, RpoS, the major stress response sigma factor, activates, and Fis represses LapF expression. This study focused on the LapF expression control by Fis. Indeed, using DNase I footprint analysis a Fis binding site Fis-F2 was located 150 bp upstream of the lapF gene coding sequence. The mapped 5′ end of the lapF mRNA localized the promoter to the same region, overlapping with the Fis binding site Fis-F2. Monitoring the lapF promoter activity by a β-galactosidase assay revealed that Fis overexpression causes a 4-fold decrease in the transcriptional activity. Furthermore, mutations that diminished Fis binding to the Fis-F2 site abolished the repression of the lapF promoter. Thus, these data suggest that Fis is involved in the biofilm regulation via repression of LapF expression.

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<![CDATA[The Regulation of para-Nitrophenol Degradation in Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db4cab0ee8fa60bda7db

Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4 can efficiently degrade para-nitrophenol and its intermediate metabolite hydroquinone. The regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation was studied, and PNP induced a global change in the transcriptome of P. putida DLL-E4. When grown on PNP, the wild-type strain exhibited significant downregulation of 2912 genes and upregulation of 845 genes, whereas 2927 genes were downregulated and 891 genes upregulated in a pnpR-deleted strain. Genes related to two non-coding RNAs (ins1 and ins2), para-nitrophenol metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the outer membrane porin OprB, glucose dehydrogenase Gcd, and carbon catabolite repression were significantly upregulated when cells were grown on para-nitrophenol plus glucose. pnpA, pnpR, pnpC1C2DECX1X2, and pnpR1 are key genes in para-nitrophenol degradation, whereas pnpAb and pnpC1bC2bDbEbCbX1bX2b have lost the ability to degrade para-nitrophenol. Multiple components including transcriptional regulators and other unknown factors regulate para-nitrophenol degradation, and the transcriptional regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation is complex. Glucose utilization was enhanced at early stages of para-nitrophenol supplementation. However, it was inhibited after the total consumption of para-nitrophenol. The addition of glucose led to a significant enhancement in para-nitrophenol degradation and up-regulation in the expression of genes involved in para-nitrophenol degradation and carbon catabolite repression (CCR). It seemed that para-nitrophenol degradation can be regulated by CCR, and relief of CCR might contribute to enhanced para-nitrophenol degradation. In brief, the regulation of para-nitrophenol degradation seems to be controlled by multiple factors and requires further study.

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<![CDATA[Specific Gene Loci of Clinical Pseudomonas putida Isolates]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989daaeab0ee8fa60baa664

Pseudomonas putida are ubiquitous inhabitants of soils and clinical isolates of this species have been seldom described. Clinical isolates show significant variability in their ability to cause damage to hosts because some of them are able to modulate the host’s immune response. In the current study, comparisons between the genomes of different clinical and environmental strains of P. putida were done to identify genetic clusters shared by clinical isolates that are not present in environmental isolates. We show that in clinical strains specific genes are mostly present on transposons, and that this set of genes exhibit high identity with genes found in pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. The set of genes prevalent in P. putida clinical isolates, and absent in environmental isolates, are related with survival under oxidative stress conditions, resistance against biocides, amino acid metabolism and toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems. This set of functions have influence in colonization and survival within human tissues, since they avoid host immune response or enhance stress resistance. An in depth bioinformatic analysis was also carried out to identify genetic clusters that are exclusive to each of the clinical isolates and that correlate with phenotypical differences between them, a secretion system type III-like was found in one of these clinical strains, a determinant of pathogenicity in Gram-negative bacteria.

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<![CDATA[Investigation into the Mode of Phosphate Activation in the 4-Hydroxy-4-Methyl-2-Oxoglutarate/4-Carboxy-4-Hydroxy-2-Oxoadipate Aldolase from Pseudomonas putida F1]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dae6ab0ee8fa60bbd8d5

The 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-oxoglutarate (HMG)/4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate (CHA) aldolase is the last enzyme of both the gallate and protocatechuate 4,5-cleavage pathways which links aromatic catabolism to central cellular metabolism. The enzyme is a class II, divalent metal dependent, aldolase which is activated in the presence of inorganic phosphate (Pi), increasing its turnover rate >10-fold. This phosphate activation is unique for a class II aldolase. The aldolase pyruvate methyl proton exchange rate, a probe of the general acid half reaction, was increased 300-fold in the presence of 1 mM Pi and the rate enhancement followed saturation kinetics giving rise to a KM of 397 ± 30 μM. Docking studies revealed a potential Pi binding site close to, or overlapping with, the proposed general acid water site. Putative Pi binding residues were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis which resulted in reductions of Pi activation. Significantly, the active site residue Arg-123, known to be critical for the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, was also implicated in supporting Pi mediated activation.

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