ResearchPad - pulmonary-arteries https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Levosimendan reduces segmental pulmonary vascular resistance in isolated perfused rat lungs and relaxes human pulmonary vessels]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_15739 Levosimendan is approved for acute heart failure. Within this context, pulmonary hypertension represents a frequent co-morbidity. Hence, the effects of levosimendan on segmental pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) are relevant. So far, this issue has been not studied. Beyond that the relaxant effects of levosimendan in human pulmonary vessel are unknown. We addressed these topics in rats’ isolated perfused lungs (IPL) and human precision-cut lung slices (PCLS).Material and methodsIn IPL, levosimendan (10 μM) was perfused in untreated and endothelin-1 pre-contracted lungs. The pulmonary arterial pressure (PPA) was continuously recorded and the capillary pressure (Pcap) was determined by the double-occlusion method. Thereafter, segmental PVR, expressed as precapillary (Rpre) and postcapillary resistance (Rpost) and PVR were calculated. Human PCLS were prepared from patients undergoing lobectomy. Levosimendan-induced relaxation was studied in naïve and endothelin-1 pre-contracted PAs and PVs. In endothelin-1 pre-contracted PAs, the role of K+-channels was studied by inhibition of KATP-channels (glibenclamide), BKCa2+-channels (iberiotoxin) and Kv-channels (4-aminopyridine). All changes of the vascular tone were measured by videomicroscopy. In addition, the increase of cAMP/GMP due to levosimendan was measured by ELISA.ResultsLevosimendan did not relax untreated lungs or naïve PAs and PVs. In IPL, levosimendan attenuated the endothelin-1 induced increase of PPA, PVR, Rpre and Rpost. In human PCLS, levosimendan relaxed pre-contracted PAs or PVs to 137% or 127%, respectively. In pre-contracted PAs, the relaxant effect of levosimendan was reduced, if KATP- and Kv-channels were inhibited. Further, levosimendan increased cGMP in PAs/PVs, but cAMP only in PVs.DiscussionLevosimendan reduces rats’ segmental PVR and relaxes human PAs or PVs, if the pulmonary vascular tone is enhanced by endothelin-1. Regarding levosimendan-induced relaxation, the activation of KATP- and Kv-channels is of impact, as well as the formation of cAMP and cGMP. In conclusion, our results suggest that levosimendan improves pulmonary haemodynamics, if PVR is increased as it is the case in pulmonary hypertension. ]]> <![CDATA[Pulmonary ductal coarctation and left pulmonary artery interruption; pathology and role of neural crest and second heart field during development]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14709 In congenital heart malformations with pulmonary stenosis to atresia an abnormal lateral ductus arteriosus to left pulmonary artery connection can lead to a localised narrowing (pulmonary ductal coarctation) or even interruption We investigated embryonic remodelling and pathogenesis of this area.Material and methodsNormal development was studied in WntCre reporter mice (E10.0–12.5) for neural crest cells and Nkx2.5 immunostaining for second heart field cells. Data were compared to stage matched human embryos and a VEGF120/120 mutant mouse strain developing pulmonary atresia.ResultsNormal mouse and human embryos showed that the mid-pharyngeal endothelial plexus, connected side-ways to the 6th pharyngeal arch artery. The ventral segment formed the proximal pulmonary artery. The dorsal segment (future DA) was solely surrounded by neural crest cells. The ventral segment had a dual outer lining with neural crest and second heart field cells, while the distal pulmonary artery was covered by none of these cells. The asymmetric contribution of second heart field to the future pulmonary trunk on the left side of the aortic sac (so-called pulmonary push) was evident. The ventral segment became incorporated into the pulmonary trunk leading to a separate connection of the left and right pulmonary arteries. The VEGF120/120 embryos showed a stunted pulmonary push and a variety of vascular anomalies.SummarySide-way connection of the DA to the left pulmonary artery is a congenital anomaly. The primary problem is a stunted development of the pulmonary push leading to pulmonary stenosis/atresia and a subsequent lack of proper incorporation of the ventral segment into the aortic sac. Clinically, the aberrant smooth muscle tissue of the ductus arteriosus should be addressed to prohibit development of severe pulmonary ductal coarctation or even interruption of the left pulmonary artery. ]]> <![CDATA[Nocturnal hypercapnia with daytime normocapnia in patients with advanced pulmonary arterial hypertension awaiting lung transplantation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nacc6463a-eb28-4f4a-acf0-c81fc9df01f4

Background

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is frequently complicated by sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and previous studies have largely focused on hypoxemic SDB. Even though nocturnal hypercapnia was shown to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension, the clinical significance of nocturnal hypercapnia among PAH patients has been scarcely investigated.

Method

Seventeen patients with PAH were identified from 246 consecutive patients referred to Kyoto University Hospital for the evaluation of lung transplant registration from January 2010 to December 2017. Included in this study were 13 patients whose nocturnal transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PtcCO2) monitoring data were available. Nocturnal hypercapnia was diagnosed according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Associations of nocturnal PtcCO2 measurements with clinical features, the findings of right heart catheterization and pulmonary function parameters were evaluated.

Results

Nocturnal hypercapnia was diagnosed in six patients (46.2%), while no patient had daytime hypercapnia. Of note, nocturnal hypercapnia was found for 5 out of 6 patients with idiopathic PAH (83.3%). Mean nocturnal PtcCO2 levels correlated negatively with the percentage of predicted total lung capacity (TLC), and positively with cardiac output and cardiac index.

Conclusion

Nocturnal hypercapnia was prevalent among advanced PAH patients who were waiting for lung transplantation, and associated with %TLC. Nocturnal hypercapnia was associated with the increase in cardiac output, which might potentially worsen pulmonary hypertension especially during sleep. Further studies are needed to investigate hemodynamics during sleep and to clarify whether nocturnal hypercapnia can be a therapeutic target for PAH patients.

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<![CDATA[Elevated levels of autoantibodies against EXD2 and PHAX in the sera of patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dca33d5eed0c48452a8b5

While circulating autoantibodies have been detected in patients with several cardiovascular diseases, such studies have not been performed for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Here we investigated the production of certain auto-antibodies in CTEPH patients. Initial screening was performed in 5 CTEPH patients and 5 healthy donors (HDs) using a ProtoArray Human Protein Microarray v5.1 containing 9,375 human proteins, and we selected 34 antigens recognized by IgG antibodies more strongly in the sera of CTEPH patients than in the sera of HDs. In subsequent second/third analyses, we validated the auto-antibody level using amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay-linked immunosorbent assay (AlphaLISA) in 96 CTEPH patients and 96 HDs as follows: At the second screening, we used 63 crude peptides derived from those selected 34 antigens and found that the serum levels of autoantibodies for 4 peptides seemed higher in CTEPH patients than in HDs. In third analysis, we used the purified peptides of those selected in second screening and found that serum antibodies against peptides derived from exonuclease 3'-5' domain-containing 2 (EXD2) and phosphorylated adaptor for RNA export (PHAX) were significantly higher in CTEPH patients than in HDs. The serum antibody levels to these antigens were also elevated in PAH patients. The titers against EXD2 peptide decreased after surgical treatment in CTEPH patients. These autoantibodies may be useful as biomarkers of CTEPH and PAH, and further investigations may provide novel insight into the etiology.

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<![CDATA[Role of BRCA1-associated protein (BRAP) variant in childhood pulmonary arterial hypertension]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5ca2b0d5eed0c48441e8b1

Although mutations in several genes have been reported in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), most of PAH cases do not carry these mutations. This study aimed to identify a novel cause of PAH. To determine the disease-causing variants, direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification were performed to analyze 18 families with multiple affected family members with PAH. In one of the 18 families with PAH, no disease-causing variants were found in any of BMPR2, ACVRL1, ENG, SMAD1/4/8, BMPR1B, NOTCH3, CAV1, or KCNK3. In this family, a female proband and her paternal aunt developed PAH in their childhood. Whole-exome next-generation sequencing was performed in the 2 PAH patients and the proband’s healthy mother, and a BRCA1-associated protein (BRAP) gene variant, p.Arg554Leu, was identified in the 2 family members with PAH, but not in the proband’s mother without PAH. Functional analyses were performed using human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs). Knockdown of BRAP via small interfering RNA in hPASMCs induced p53 signaling pathway activation and decreased cell proliferation. Overexpression of either wild-type BRAP or p.Arg554Leu-BRAP cDNA constructs caused cell death confounding these studies, however we observed higher levels of p53 signaling inactivation and hPASMC proliferation in cells expressing p.Arg554Leu-BRAP compared to wild-type BRAP. In addition, p.Arg554Leu-BRAP induced decreased apoptosis of hPASMCs compared with wild-type BRAP. In conclusion, we have identified a novel variant of BRAP in a Japanese family with PAH and our results suggest it could have a gain-of-function. This study sheds light on new mechanism of PAH pathogenesis.

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<![CDATA[Elevated pulmonary arterial pressure in Zucker diabetic fatty rats]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c58d612d5eed0c484031535

Diabetes is a very strong predictor of chronic systemic vascular diseases and acute cardiovascular events. Recently, associations between metabolic disorders and pulmonary hypertension have also been reported in both humans and animal models. In order to get some further insight into the relationship of pulmonary hypertension with obesity, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia, herein we have used the Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF/clr-lepr fa) at 20 weeks fed a standard diet and compared to their lean Zucker littermates (ZL). ZDF rats were obese, had elevated plasma glucose levels and insulin resistance, i.e. a clinically relevant model of type 2 diabetes. They presented elevated systolic, diastolic and mean pulmonary arterial pressures and a parallel increase in the Fulton index. Systemic arterial pressures were also increased but the left ventricle plus septum weight was similar in both groups and the heart rate was reduced. Wall media thickening was observed in the small pulmonary arteries from the ZDF rats. Isolated pulmonary arteries mounted in a wire myograph showed similar vasoconstrictor responses to phenylephrine and 5-HT and similar responses to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine. However, the iNOS inhibitor 1400W enhanced the vasoconstrictor responses in ZDF but not in ZL rats. The protein expression of eNOS and iNOS was not significantly different in the lungs of the two groups. The lung expression of Bmpr2 mRNA was downregulated. However, the mRNA expression of Kcna5, Kcnk3, Kcnq1, Kcnq4 or Kcnq5, which encode for the potassium channels Kv1.5, TASK-1, Kv7.1, Kv7.4 and Kv7.5, respectively, was similar in ZL and ZDF rats. In conclusion, ZDF rats show increased pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary arterial medial thickening and downregulated lung Bmpr2 despite leptin resistance. These changes were mild but are consistent with the view that diabetes is a risk factor for pulmonary hypertension.

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<![CDATA[Sildenafil does not improve performance in 16.1 km cycle exercise time-trial in acute hypoxia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c605a97d5eed0c4847cd2ae

Sildenafil is a pulmonary vasodilator that has potential to mitigate the decrement in endurance performance caused by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of sildenafil on pulmonary artery pressure, cardiac output, pulse oxygen saturation, and exercise performance at moderate simulated altitude. We hypothesized that sildenafil would reduce the decline in exercise performance in hypoxia by blunting the rise in pulmonary artery pressure and causing a relative increase in cardiac output and oxygen saturation. Twelve endurance trained men performed three experimental cycling trials at sea level and simulated moderate altitude of 3,000m (FIO2 = 0.147) after ingesting either a placebo or sildenafil 50 mg capsule in a double blinded fashion. Each test consisted of a warmup period, a 15-minute steady state period at 60% of peak power output, and a 16.1 km time-trial. All subjects experienced a decline in maximal exercise capacity in hypoxia that ranged from 6% to 24%. This decline was correlated with the reduction in pulse oxygen saturation in hypoxic maximal exercise. Sildenafil had no effect on pulmonary artery pressure, cardiac output, or pulse oxygen saturation measured during steady state exercise. There was no effect of sildenafil on mean power output during the time-trial. During high intensity cycle exercise in acute, moderate hypoxia pulmonary artery pressure is unaffected by sildenafil and does not appear to influence cardiovascular function or exercise performance.

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<![CDATA[A phenotype of increased sleepiness in a mouse model of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c141f0ad5eed0c484d29621

The relationship between cardiovascular disease and abnormalities in sleep architecture is complex and bi-directional. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) often confounds human studies examining sleep in the setting of heart failure, and the independent impact of isolated right or left heart failure on sleep is difficult to assess. We utilized an animal model of right heart failure using pulmonary artery banding (PAB) in mice to examine the causal effect of right heart failure on sleep architecture. Four weeks after PAB or sham (control) surgery, sleep was measured by polysomnography for 48 hours and right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy confirmed prior to sacrifice. PAB resulted in right ventricular hypertrophy based on a 30% increase in the Fulton Index (p < 0.01). After PAB, mice spent significantly more time in NREM sleep compared to the control group over a 24 hour period (53.5 ± 1.5% vs. 46.6 ± 1.4%; p < 0.01) and exhibited an inability to both cycle into REM sleep and decrease delta density across the light/sleep period. Our results support a phenotype of impaired sleep cycling and increased ‘sleepiness’ in a mouse model of RV dysfunction.

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<![CDATA[Comparison of forced-air and water-circulating warming for prevention of hypothermia during transcatheter aortic valve replacement]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be028a

Introduction

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) procedures at our institution were complicated by perioperative hypothermia despite use of the standard of care forced-air convective warming device (the BairHugger, Augustine Medical Inc, Eden Prairie, MN, USA). To remedy this problem, we initiated a quality improvement process that investigated the use of a conductive warm water-circulating device (the Allon ThermoWrap, Menen Medical Corporation, Trevose, PA, USA), and hypothesized that it would decrease the incidence of perioperative hypothermia.

Methods

We compared two different intraoperative warming devices using a historic control. We retrospectively reviewed intraoperative records of 80 TAVRs between 6/2013 and 6/2015, 46 and 34 of which were done with the forced-air and water-circulating devices, respectively. Continuous temperature data obtained from pulmonary artery catheter, temperature upon arrival to cardiothoracic ICU (CTU), age, BSA, height, and BMI were compared.

Results

Patients warmed with both devices were similar in terms of demographic characteristics. First recorded intraoperative temperature (mean 36.26 ± SD 0.61 vs. 35.95 ± 0.46°C, p = 0.02), lowest intraoperative temperature (36.01 ± 0.58 vs. 34.89 ± 0.76°C, p<0.001), temperature at the end of the procedure (36.47 ± 0.51 vs. 35.17 ± 0.75°C, p<0.001), and temperature upon arrival to the CTU (36.35 ± 0.44 vs. 35.07 ± 0.78°C, p<0.001) were significantly higher in the water-circulating group as compared to the forced-air group.

Conclusion

A quality improvement process led to selection of a new warming device that virtually eliminated perioperative hypothermia at our institution. Patients warmed with the new device were significantly less likely to experience intraoperative hypothermia and were significantly more likely to be normothermic upon arrival to the CTU.

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<![CDATA[A Computational Study on the Relation between Resting Heart Rate and Atrial Fibrillation Hemodynamics under Exercise]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dad9ab0ee8fa60bb945f

Aims

Clinical data indicating a heart rate (HR) target during rate control therapy for permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) and assessing its eventual relationship with reduced exercise tolerance are lacking. The present study aims at investigating the impact of resting HR on the hemodynamic response to exercise in permanent AF patients by means of a computational cardiovascular model.

Methods

The AF lumped-parameter model was run to simulate resting (1 Metabolic Equivalent of Task—MET) and various exercise conditions (4 METs: brisk walking; 6 METs: skiing; 8 METs: running), considering different resting HR (70 bpm for the slower resting HR—SHR—simulations, and 100 bpm for the higher resting HR—HHR—simulations). To compare relative variations of cardiovascular variables upon exertion, the variation comparative index (VCI)—the absolute variation between the exercise and the resting values in SHR simulations referred to the absolute variation in HHR simulations—was calculated at each exercise grade (VCI4, VCI6 and VCI8).

Results

Pulmonary venous pressure underwent a greater increase in HHR compared to SHR simulations (VCI4 = 0.71, VCI6 = 0.73 and VCI8 = 0.77), while for systemic arterial pressure the opposite is true (VCI4 = 1.15, VCI6 = 1.36, VCI8 = 1.56).

Conclusions

The computational findings suggest that a slower, with respect to a higher resting HR, might be preferable in permanent AF patients, since during exercise pulmonary venous pressure undergoes a slighter increase and systemic blood pressure reveals a more appropriate increase.

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<![CDATA[Systemic and Pulmonary Vascular Remodelling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dacaab0ee8fa60bb3e11

Background

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is associated with subclinical systemic atherosclerosis and pulmonary vascular remodelling characterized by intimal hyperplasia and luminal narrowing. We aimed to determine differences in the intimal thickening of systemic and pulmonary arteries in COPD subjects and smokers. Secondary aims include comparisons with a non-smokers group; determining the clinical variables associated with systemic and pulmonary intimal thickening, and the correlations between systemic and pulmonary remodelling changes.

Methods

All consecutive subjects undergoing lung resection were included and divided into 3 groups: 1) COPD, 2) smokers, and 3) non-smokers. Sections of the 5th intercostal artery and muscular pulmonary arteries were measured by histo-morphometry. Four parameters of intimal thickening were evaluated: 1) percentage of intimal area (%IA), 2) percentage of luminal narrowing, 3) intimal thickness index, and 4) intima-to-media ratio.

Results

In the adjusted analysis, the systemic arteries of COPD subjects showed greater intimal thickening (%IA) than those of smokers (15.6±1.5% vs. 14.2±1.6%, p = 0.038). In the pulmonary arteries, significant differences were observed for %IA between the 2 groups (37.3±2.2% vs. 29.3±2.3%, p = 0.016). Among clinical factors, metabolic syndrome, gender and COPD status were associated with the systemic intimal thickening, while only COPD status was associated with pulmonary intimal thickening. A correlation between the %IA of the systemic and pulmonary arteries was observed (Spearman’s rho = 0.46, p = 0.008).

Conclusions

Greater intimal thickening in systemic and pulmonary arteries is observed in COPD patients than in smokers. There is a correlation between systemic and pulmonary vascular remodelling in the overall population.

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<![CDATA[High Frequency of Pulmonary Hypertension-Causing Gene Mutation in Chinese Patients with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9f4ab0ee8fa60b6fb70

The pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is unknown. Histopathologic studies revealed that pulmonary vasculature lesions similar to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) existed in CTEPH patients as well. It’s well-known that genetic predisposition plays an important role in the mechanism of PAH. So we hypothesized that PAH-causing gene mutation might exist in some CTEPH patients and act as a background to facilitate the development of CTEPH. In this study, we analyzed 7 PAH-causing genes including BMPR2, ACVRL1, ENG, SMAD9, CAV1, KCNK3, and CBLN2 in 49 CTEPH patients and 17 patients recovered from pulmonary embolism (PE) but without pulmonary hypertension(PH). The results showed that the nonsynonymous mutation rate in CTEPH patients is significantly higher than that in PE without PH patients (25 out of 49 (51%) CTEPH patients vs. 3 out of 17 PE without PH patients (18%); p = 0.022). Four CTEPH patients had the same point mutation in ACVRL1 exon 10 (c.1450C>G), a mutation approved to be associated with PH in a previous study. In addition, we identified two CTEPH associated SNPs (rs3739817 and rs55805125). Our results suggest that PAH-causing gene mutation might play an important role in the development of CTEPH.

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<![CDATA[CT Pulmonary Angiography at Reduced Radiation Exposure and Contrast Material Volume Using Iterative Model Reconstruction and iDose4 Technique in Comparison to FBP]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da1bab0ee8fa60b7cde8

Purpose

To assess image quality of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) at reduced radiation exposure (RD-CTPA) and contrast medium (CM) volume using two different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms (iDose4 and iterative model reconstruction (IMR)) in comparison to filtered back projection (FBP).

Materials and Methods

52 patients (body weight < 100 kg, mean BMI: 23.9) with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) underwent RD-CTPA (tube voltage: 80 kV; mean CTDIvol: 1.9 mGy) using 40 ml CM. Data were reconstructed using FBP and two different IR algorithms (iDose4 and IMR). Subjective and objective image quality and conspicuity of PE were assessed in central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries.

Results

Noise reduction of 55% was achieved with iDose4 and of 85% with IMR compared to FBP. Contrast-to-noise ratio significantly increased with iDose4 and IMR compared to FBP (p<0.05). Subjective image quality was rated significantly higher at IMR reconstructions in comparison to iDose4 and FBP. Conspicuity of central and segmental PE significantly improved with the use of IMR. In subsegmental arteries, iDose4 was superior to IMR.

Conclusions

CTPA at reduced radiation exposure and contrast medium volume is feasible with the use of IMR, which provides improved image quality and conspicuity of pulmonary embolism in central and segmental arteries.

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<![CDATA[The 2013 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Classification Criteria for Systemic Sclerosis Could Classify Systemic Sclerosis Patients at Earlier Stage: Data from a Chinese EUSTAR Center]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db06ab0ee8fa60bc8940

Objectives

To evaluate the performance of the 2013 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for systemic sclerosis (SSc) in clinical practice in a Chinese patient cohort, and to compare outcomes with the 1980 ACR criteria.

Methods

Patients clinically diagnosed with SSc between September 2013 and May 2015 were prospectively recruited from the EUSTAR database of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Diagnosis of SSc was based on the evaluation of three experienced rheumatologists. Patients diagnosed with other connective tissue diseases were recruited as disease controls. The 1980 ACR and 2013 ACR/EULAR criteria were applied to the cohort, and patients who fulfilled the criteria were classified as definite SSc patients. Sensitivity and specificity were analyzed for the 2013 and 1980 criteria.

Results

A total of 143 SSc patients and 87 patients with other connective diseases were recruited. 41 (28.7%) and 102 (71.3%) cases were diffuse cutaneous SSc and limited cutaneous SSc, respectively. Although the sensitivity of the 2013 criteria (94.4%) exceeded the 1980 criteria (72.7%) (P<0.001), the 1980 and 2013 criteria sets showed no significant difference in specificity (97.7% and 93.1%, respectively, P = 0.278). The sensitivity of the 2013 criteria was significantly higher than the 1980 criteria in some SSc subgroups (e.g., lcSSc, abnormal pattern of nailfold videocapillaroscopy [NVC] and presence of Raynaud’s phenomenon [RP]) compared to others.

Conclusions

Relative to the 1980 ACR criteria, in Chinese SSc patients the new 2013 ACR/EULAR criteria had similar specificity and higher sensitivity, especially for patients with mild skin thickening or prominent microvascular diseases.

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<![CDATA[Migratory phase of Litomosoides sigmodontis filarial infective larvae is associated with pathology and transient increase of S100A9 expressing neutrophils in the lung]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5cab0ee8fa60be01cd

Filarial infections are tropical diseases caused by nematodes of the Onchocercidae family such as Mansonella perstans. The infective larvae (L3) are transmitted into the skin of vertebrate hosts by blood-feeding vectors. Many filarial species settle in the serous cavities including M. perstans in humans and L. sigmodontis, a well-established model of filariasis in mice. L. sigmodontis L3 migrate to the pleural cavity where they moult into L4 around day 9 and into male and female adult worms around day 30. Little is known of the early phase of the parasite life cycle, after the L3 is inoculated in the dermis by the vector and enters the afferent lymphatic vessels and before the moulting processes in the pleural cavity. Here we reveal a pulmonary phase associated with lung damage characterized by haemorrhages and granulomas suggesting L3 reach the lung via pulmonary capillaries and damage the endothelium and parenchyma by crossing them to enter the pleural cavity. This study also provides evidence for a transient inflammation in the lung characterized by a very early recruitment of neutrophils associated with high expression levels of S100A8 and S100A9 proteins.

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<![CDATA[Therapeutic Benefits of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dab0ab0ee8fa60bab40f

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by progressive increases in vascular resistance and the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. The accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lung and elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in the bloodstream suggest that inflammation may play a role in PAH. In this study, the benefits of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and iPSC-conditioned medium (iPSC CM) were explored in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rats. We demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPSC CM significantly reduced the right ventricular systolic pressure and ameliorated the hypertrophy of the right ventricle in MCT-induced PAH rats in models of both disease prevention and disease reversal. In the prevention of MCT-induced PAH, iPSC-based therapy led to the decreased accumulation of inflammatory cells and down-regulated the expression of the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12α, IL-12β, IL-23 and IFNγ genes in lung specimens, which implied that iPSC-based therapy may be involved in the regulation of inflammation. NF-κB signaling is essential to the inflammatory cascade, which is activated via the phosphorylation of the NF-κB molecule. Using the chemical inhibitor specifically blocked the phosphorylation of NF-κB, and in vitro assays of cultured human M1 macrophages implied that the anti-inflammation effect of iPSC-based therapy may contribute to the disturbance of NF-κB activation. Here, we showed that iPSC-based therapy could restore the hemodynamic function of right ventricle with benefits for preventing the ongoing inflammation in the lungs of MCT-induced PAH rats by regulating NF-κB phosphorylation.

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<![CDATA[Renal Function Trajectories in Patients with Prior Improved eGFR Slopes and Risk of Death]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db39ab0ee8fa60bd4567

Background

Multiple prior studies demonstrated that patients with early Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and positive estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) slopes experience increased risk of death. We sought to characterize patients with positive eGFR slopes, examine the renal function trajectory that follows the time period where positive slope is observed, and examine the association between different trajectories and risk of death.

Methods and Findings

We built a cohort of 204,132 United States veterans with early CKD stage 3; eGFR slopes were defined based on Bayesian mixed-effects models using outpatient eGFR measurements between October 1999 and September 2004; to build renal function trajectories, patients were followed longitudinally thereafter (from October 2004) until September 2013. There were 41,410 (20.29%) patients with positive eGFR slope and they exhibited increased risk of death compared to patients with stable eGFR slope (HR = 1.33, CI:1.31–1.35). There was an inverse graded association between severity of albuminuria and the odds of positive eGFR slope (OR = 0.94, CI:0.90–0.98, and OR = 0.76, CI:0.69–0.84 for microalbuminuria and albuminuria; respectively). Following the time period where positive eGFR slope is observed, we characterized 4 trajectory phenotypes: high eGFR intercept and positive trajectory (HIPT) (12.42%), intermediate intercept and mild negative trajectory (IIMNT) (60.04%), low intercept and fast negative trajectory (LIFNT)(23.33%), and high intercept and fast negative trajectory (HIFNT) (4.20%). Compared to IIMNT (reference group), HIPT is associated with younger age, dementia, HIV, chronic lung disease, peripheral artery disease, weight loss, and inversely associated with albuminuria; LIFNT and HIFNT were associated with diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, peripheral artery disease, and albuminuria. The risk of death at 9 years was lowest in IIMNT (HR = 1.12, CI:1.09–1.14), highest in HIPT (HR = 1.71, CI:1.63–1.79), and intermediate in LIFNT (HR = 1.36, CI:1.32–1.40) and HIFNT (HR = 1.56, CI:1.45–1.68).

Conclusions

Our results demonstrate that patients with positive eGFR slopes, when followed over longer period of time, follow 4 distinct trajectory phenotypes that have distinct demographic and clinical correlates and are differentially associated with risk of death.

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<![CDATA[Enhanced Pulmonary Vascular and Alveolar Development via Prenatal Administration of a Slow-Release Synthetic Prostacyclin Agonist in Rat Fetal Lung Hypoplasia]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9d6ab0ee8fa60b65f8b

Lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension are the major causes of mortality in neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Although the prostaglandin pathway plays a pivotal role in lung development, the reported efficacy of postnatal prostaglandin agonist treatment is suboptimal. We hypothesized that prenatal treatment with ONO-1301SR, a slow-release form of a novel synthetic prostacyclin agonist with thromboxane inhibitory activity, might enhance the development of lungs exhibiting hypoplasia in the fetal period. On embryonic day (E) 9.5, nitrofen was given to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to establish a CDH-related lung hypoplasia model, whereas normal rats received the vehicle only. The same day, either ONO-1301SR or a placebo was also randomly administered. On E21.5, the fetuses of the normal group and those exhibiting CDH were analyzed. Prenatal ONO-1301SR administration had no influence on the incidence of nitrofen-induced CDH. The lung-to-body weight ratio in the CDH+ONO group was greater than that in the CDH group. Histologically, the medial wall in the CDH+ONO group was two-thirds thinner than that in the CDH group. In addition, the number of Ttf-1-positive cells and the capillary density were ≥1.5 times greater in the CDH+ONO group than in the CDH group, and this increase was associated with higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor in the CDH+ONO group, suggesting enhanced development of the alveolar and capillary networks. Thus, prenatal ONO-1301SR was protective against the progression of lung hypoplasia associated with CDH in a nitrofen-induced rat model, indicating the potential of this treatment for pathologies exhibiting lung hypoplasia.

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<![CDATA[Relationship between low tube voltage (70 kV) and the iodine delivery rate (IDR) in CT angiography: An experimental in-vivo study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbf16

Objective

Very short acquisition times and the use of low-kV protocols in CTA demand modifications in the contrast media (CM) injection regimen. The aim of this study was to optimize the use of CM delivery parameters in thoraco-abdominal CTA in a porcine model.

Materials and methods

Six pigs (55–68 kg) were examined with a dynamic CTA protocol (454 mm scan length, 2.5 s temporal resolution, 70 s total acquisition time). Four CM injection protocols were applied in a randomized order. 120 kV CTA protocol: (A) 300 mg iodine/kg bodyweight (bw), IDR = 1.5 g/s (flow = 5 mL/s), injection time (ti) 12 s (60 kg bw). 70 kV CTA protocols: 150 mg iodine/kg bw: (B) IDR = 0.75 g/s (flow = 2.5 mL/s), ti = 12 s (60 kg bw); (C) IDR = 1.5 g/s (flow = 5 mL/s), ti = 12 s (60 kg bw); (D) IDR = 3.0 g/s (flow = 10 mL/s), ti = 3 s (60 kg bw). The complete CM bolus shape was monitored by creating time attenuation curves (TAC) in different vascular territories. Based on the TAC, the time to peak (TTP) and the peak enhancement were determined. The diagnostic window (relative enhancement > 300 HU), was calculated and compared to visual inspection of the corresponding CTA data sets.

Results

The average relative arterial peak enhancements after baseline correction were 358.6 HU (A), 356.6 HU (B), 464.0 HU (C), and 477.6 HU (D). The TTP decreased with increasing IDR and decreasing ti, protocols A and B did not differ significantly (systemic arteries, p = 0.843; pulmonary arteries, p = 0.183). The delay time for bolus tracking (trigger level 100 HU; target enhancement 300 HU) for single-phase CTA was comparable for protocol A and B (3.9, 4.3 s) and C and D (2.4, 2.0 s). The scan window time frame was comparable for the different protocols by visual inspection of the different CTA data sets and by analyzing the TAC.

Conclusions

All protocols provided sufficient arterial enhancement. The use of a 70 kV CTA protocol is recommended because of a 50% reduction of total CM volume and a 50% reduced flow rate while maintaining the bolus profile. In contrast to pulmonary arterial enhancement, the systemic arterial enhancement improved only slightly increasing the IDR from 1.5 g/s to 3 g/s because of bolus dispersion of the very short bolus (3s) in the lungs.

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<![CDATA[Oesophageal heat exchangers with a diameter of 11mm or 14.7mm are equally effective and safe for targeted temperature management]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db50ab0ee8fa60bdbe5e

Background

Targeted temperature management (TTM) is widely used in critical care settings for conditions including hepatic encephalopathy, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, meningitis, myocardial infarction, paediatric cardiac arrest, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, ischemic stroke and sepsis. Furthermore, TTM is a key treatment for patients after out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest (OHCA). However, the optimal cooling method, which is quick, safe and cost-effective still remains controversial. Since the oesophagus is adjacent to heart and aorta, fast heat-convection to the central blood-stream could be achieved with a minimally invasive oesophageal heat exchanger (OHE). To date, the optimal diameter of an OHE is still unknown. While larger diameters may cause thermal- or pressure-related tissue damage after long-term exposure to the oesophageal wall, smaller diameter (e.g., gastric tubes, up to 11mm) may not provide effective cooling rates. Thus, the objective of the study was to compare OHE-diameters of 11mm (OHE11) and 14.7mm (OHE14.7) and their effects on tissue and cooling capability.

Methods

Pigs were randomized to OHE11 (N = 8) or OHE14.7 (N = 8). After cooling, pigs were maintained at 33°C for 1 hour. After 10h rewarming, oesophagi were analyzed by means of histopathology. The oesophagus of four animals from a separate study that underwent exactly the identical preparation and cooling protocol described above but received a maintenance period of 24h were used as histopathological controls.

Results

Mean cooling rates were 2.8±0.4°C°C/h (OHE11) and 3.0±0.3°C °C/h (OHE14.7; p = 0.20). Occasional mild acute inflammatory transepithelial infiltrates were found in the cranial segment of the oesophagus in all groups including controls. Deviations from target temperature were 0.1±0.4°C (OHE11) and 0±0.1°C (OHE14.7; p = 0.91). Rewarming rates were 0.19±0.07°C °C/h (OHE11) and 0.20±0.05°C °C/h (OHE14.7; p = 0.75).

Conclusions

OHE with diameters of 11 mm and 14.7 mm achieve effective cooling rates for TTM and did not cause any relevant oesophageal tissue damage. Both OHE demonstrated acceptable deviations from target temperature and allowed for an intended rewarming rate (0.25°C/h).

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