ResearchPad - pulmonary-function https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Possible risk factors for poor asthma control assessed in a cross-sectional population-based study from Telemark, Norway]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13801 This cross-sectional study of the general population of Telemark County, Norway, aimed to identify risk factors associated with poor asthma control as defined by the Asthma Control Test (ACT), and to determine the proportions of patients with poorly controlled asthma who had undergone spirometry, used asthma medication, or been examined by a pulmonary physician. In 2014–2015, the study recruited 326 subjects aged 16–50 years who had self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma and presence of respiratory symptoms during the previous 12 months. The clinical outcome measures were body mass index (BMI), forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), immunoglobulin E (IgE) in serum and serum C-reactive protein (CRP). An ACT score ≤ 19 was defined as poorly controlled asthma. Overall, 113 subjects (35%) reported poor asthma control. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with poorly controlled asthma were: self-reported occupational exposure to vapor, gas, dust, or fumes during the previous 12 months (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.1–3.6), body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2 (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.2–4.1), female sex (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.5–4.7), current smoking (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.5–5.3), and past smoking (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.3–4.0). Poor asthma control was also associated with reduced FEV1 after bronchodilation (β –3.6; 95% CI –7.0 to –0.2). Moreover, 13% of the participants with poor asthma control reported no use of asthma medication, 51% had not been assessed by a pulmonary physician, and 20% had never undergone spirometry. Because these data are cross-sectional, further studies assessing possible risk factors in general and objectively measured occupational exposure in particular are needed. However, our results suggest that there is room for improvement with regards to use of spirometry and pulmonary physician referrals when a patient’s asthma is inadequately controlled.

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<![CDATA[Blood co-expression modules identify potential modifier genes of diabetes and lung function in cystic fibrosis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/N07a3560c-fa96-4eb5-821e-9292b7a2bef0

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare genetic disease that affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Lung disease is variable among CF patients and associated with the development of comorbidities and chronic infections. The rate of lung function deterioration depends not only on the type of mutations in CFTR, the disease-causing gene, but also on modifier genes. In the present study, we aimed to identify genes and pathways that (i) contribute to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis and (ii) modulate the associated comorbidities. We profiled blood samples in CF patients and healthy controls and analyzed RNA-seq data with Weighted Gene Correlation Network Analysis (WGCNA). Interestingly, lung function, body mass index, the presence of diabetes, and chronic P. aeruginosa infections correlated with four modules of co-expressed genes. Detailed inspection of networks and hub genes pointed to cell adhesion, leukocyte trafficking and production of reactive oxygen species as central mechanisms in lung function decline and cystic fibrosis-related diabetes. Of note, we showed that blood is an informative surrogate tissue to study the contribution of inflammation to lung disease and diabetes in CF patients. Finally, we provided evidence that WGCNA is useful to analyze–omic datasets in rare genetic diseases as patient cohorts are inevitably small.

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<![CDATA[Nocturnal hypercapnia with daytime normocapnia in patients with advanced pulmonary arterial hypertension awaiting lung transplantation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/Nacc6463a-eb28-4f4a-acf0-c81fc9df01f4

Background

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is frequently complicated by sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and previous studies have largely focused on hypoxemic SDB. Even though nocturnal hypercapnia was shown to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension, the clinical significance of nocturnal hypercapnia among PAH patients has been scarcely investigated.

Method

Seventeen patients with PAH were identified from 246 consecutive patients referred to Kyoto University Hospital for the evaluation of lung transplant registration from January 2010 to December 2017. Included in this study were 13 patients whose nocturnal transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PtcCO2) monitoring data were available. Nocturnal hypercapnia was diagnosed according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Associations of nocturnal PtcCO2 measurements with clinical features, the findings of right heart catheterization and pulmonary function parameters were evaluated.

Results

Nocturnal hypercapnia was diagnosed in six patients (46.2%), while no patient had daytime hypercapnia. Of note, nocturnal hypercapnia was found for 5 out of 6 patients with idiopathic PAH (83.3%). Mean nocturnal PtcCO2 levels correlated negatively with the percentage of predicted total lung capacity (TLC), and positively with cardiac output and cardiac index.

Conclusion

Nocturnal hypercapnia was prevalent among advanced PAH patients who were waiting for lung transplantation, and associated with %TLC. Nocturnal hypercapnia was associated with the increase in cardiac output, which might potentially worsen pulmonary hypertension especially during sleep. Further studies are needed to investigate hemodynamics during sleep and to clarify whether nocturnal hypercapnia can be a therapeutic target for PAH patients.

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<![CDATA[Cardiopulmonary responses to maximal aerobic exercise in patients with cystic fibrosis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dca0ed5eed0c48452a718

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a debilitating chronic condition, which requires complex and expensive disease management. Exercise has now been recognised as a critical factor in improving health and quality of life in patients with CF. Hence, cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is used to determine aerobic fitness of young patients as part of the clinical management of CF. However, at present there is a lack of conclusive evidence for one limiting system of aerobic fitness for CF patients at individual patient level. Here, we perform detailed data analysis that allows us to identify important systems-level factors that affect aerobic fitness. We use patients’ data and principal component analysis to confirm the dependence of CPET performance on variables associated with ventilation and metabolic rates of oxygen consumption. We find that the time at which participants cross the gas exchange threshold (GET) is well correlated with their overall performance. Furthermore, we propose a predictive modelling framework that captures the relationship between ventilatory dynamics, lung capacity and function and performance in CPET within a group of children and adolescents with CF. Specifically, we show that using Gaussian processes (GP) we can predict GET at the individual patient level with reasonable accuracy given the small sample size of the available group of patients. We conclude by presenting an example and future perspectives for improving and extending the proposed framework. The modelling and analysis have the potential to pave the way to designing personalised exercise programmes that are tailored to specific individual needs relative to patient’s treatment therapies.

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<![CDATA[Correlation between the native lung volume change and postoperative pulmonary function after single lung transplantation for lymphangioleiomyomatosis: Evaluation of lung volume by three-dimensional computed tomography volumetry]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6b26b2d5eed0c484289ec2

Purpose

Whereas native lung overinflation has been thought to happen in recipients of single lung transplantation for lymphangioleiomyomatosis because of its increased compliance, there is no study that has reported the details on the change of the native lung volume after single lung transplantation by three-dimensional computed tomography volumetry. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the lung volume after single lung transplantation for lymphangioleiomyomatosis by three-dimensional computed tomography volumetry and investigate the correlation between the native lung volume change and postoperative pulmonary function.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed the data of 17 patients who underwent single lung transplantation for lymphangioleiomyomatosis. We defined the ratio of the native lung volume to total lung volume (N/T ratio) as an indicator of overinflation of the native lung. In order to assess changes in the N/T ratio over time, we calculated the rate of change in the N/T ratio which is standardized by the N/T ratio at 1 year after single lung transplantation: rate of change in N/T ratio (%) = {(N/T ratio at a certain year)/(N/T ratio at 1 year)– 1}× 100.

Results

We investigated the correlations between the N/T ratio and the pulmonary function test parameters at 1 year and 5 years; however, there was no significant correlation between them. On the other hand, there was a significant negative correlation between the rate of change in the N/T ratio and that in forced expiratory volume in 1 second %predicted (%FEV1) at 5 years after single lung transplantation.

Conclusion

The single lung transplantation recipients for lymphangioleiomyomatosis showed increased rate of change in the N/T ratio in the long-time course after lung transplantation with the decrease of %FEV1. We expect that these cases will probably cause the overinflation of the native lung in the future.

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<![CDATA[The effects of heated humidification to nasopharynx on nasal resistance and breathing pattern]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c648cc9d5eed0c484c817b1

Background

Mouth breathing could induce not only dry throat and eventually upper respiratory tract infection, but also snoring and obstructive sleep apnea, while nasal breathing is protective against those problems. Thus, one may want to explore an approach to modify habitual mouth breathing as preferable to nasal breathing. The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological effects of our newly developed mask on facilitation of nasal breathing.

Methods

Thirty seven healthy male volunteers were enrolled in a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial. Participants wore a newly developed heated humidification mask or non-heated-humidification mask (placebo) for 10-min each. Subjective feelings including dry nose, dry throat, nasal obstruction, ease to breathe, relaxation, calmness, and good feeling were asked before and after wearing each mask. In addition, the effects of masks on nasal resistance, breathing pattern, and heart rate variability were assessed.

Results

Compared with the placebo mask, the heated humidification mask improved all components of subjective feelings except for ease to breathe; moreover, decreased nasal resistance and respiratory frequency accompanied a simultaneous increase in a surrogate maker for tidal volume. However, use of the heated humidification mask did not affect heart rate variability

Conclusion

Adding heated humidification to the nasopharynx could modulate breathing patterns with improvement of subjective experience and objective nasal resistance.

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<![CDATA[Trabecular bone score in active or former smokers with and without COPD]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5df35dd5eed0c4845811be

Background

Smoking is a recognized risk factor for osteoporosis. Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a novel texture parameter to evaluate bone microarchitecture. TBS and their main determinants are unknown in active and former smokers.

Objective

To assess TBS in a population of active or former smokers with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and to determine its predictive factors.

Methods

Active and former smokers from a pulmonary clinic were invited to participate. Clinical features were recorded and bone turnover markers (BTMs) measured. Lung function, low dose chest Computed Tomography scans (LDCT), dual energy absorptiometry (DXA) scans were performed and TBS measured. Logistic regression analysis explored the relationship between measured parameters and TBS.

Results

One hundred and forty five patients were included in the analysis, 97 (67.8%) with COPD. TBS was lower in COPD patients (median 1.323; IQR: 0.13 vs 1.48; IQR: 0.16, p = 0.003). Regression analysis showed that a higher body mass index (BMI), younger age, less number of exacerbations and a higher forced expiratory volume-one second (FEV1%) was associated with better TBS (β = 0.005, 95% CI:0.000–0.011, p = 0.032; β = -0.003, 95% CI:-0.007(-)-0.000, p = 0.008; β = -0.019, 95% CI:-0.034(-)-0.004, p = 0.015; β = 0.001, 95% CI:0.000–0.002, p = 0.012 respectively). The same factors with similar results were found in COPD patients.

Conclusions

A significant proportion of active and former smokers with and without COPD have an affected TBS. BMI, age, number of exacerbations and the degree of airway obstruction predicts TBS values in smokers with and without COPD. This important information should be considered when evaluating smokers at risk of osteoporosis.

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<![CDATA[Decreased lung function is associated with risk of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A longitudinal cohort study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c521812d5eed0c484797204

Background

Decreased lung function is associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), based on linking mechanisms such as insulin resistance and systemic inflammation However, its association with the risk of developing NAFLD is unclear. Our aim was to investigate whether baseline lung function is associated with incident NAFLD in middle-aged healthy Koreans.

Methods

A cohort study of 96,104 subjects (mean age: 35.7 years) without NAFLD were followed up from 2002 to 2015. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasound after the exclusion of other possible causes of liver diseases. Baseline percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) and forced vital capacity (FVC%) were categorized in quartiles. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) (using the highest quartile as reference) were calculated for incident NAFLD at follow-up, controlling for covariates and potential confounders.

Results

During 579,714.5 person-years of follow-up, 24,450 participants developed NAFLD (incidence rate, 42.2 per 1,000 person-years). The mean follow-up period was 5.9±3.4 years. Regardless of smoking history, the risk for incident NAFLD increased with decreasing quartiles of FEV1 (%) and FVC (%) in a dose-response manner (p for trend<0.001). In never smokers, the aHRs (95% CIs) for incident NAFLD were 1.15 (1.08–1.21), 1.11 (1.05–1.18), and 1.08 (1.02–1.14) in quartiles 1–3 for FEV1 (%) and 1.12 (1.06–1.18), 1.11 (1.05–1.18), and 1.09 (1.03–1.15) in quartiles 1–3 for FVC (%), compared with the highest quartile reference. Similar inverse association was present in smoke-exposed subjects (aHR for incident NAFLD were 1.14, 1.21, 1.13 and 1.17, 1.11, 1.09 across FEV1(%) and FVC(%) quartile in increasing order, respectively).

Conclusions

Reduced lung function was a risk factor for incident NAFLD in a large middle-aged Korean cohort with over half a million person-years of follow-up.

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<![CDATA[Metabolic health is more closely associated with decrease in lung function than obesity]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5217fbd5eed0c484795dfe

Objective

Previous studies have evaluated the link between metabolic syndrome and obesity with impaired lung function, however findings have been controversial. We aimed to compare lung function among subjects with different metabolic health and obesity status.

Methods

Total 10,071 participants were evaluated at the Health Promotion Center in Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital between January 2012 and December 2014. Being metabolically healthy was defined as having fewer than three of the following risk factors: high blood pressure, high fasting blood glucose, high triglyceride, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and abdominal obesity. Obesity status was defined as body mass index (BMI) higher than 25 kg/m2. Analyses of pulmonary function were performed in four groups divided according to metabolic health and obesity: metabolically healthy non-obese (MHNO), metabolically health obese (MHO), metabolically unhealthy non-obese (MUHNO), and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUHO).

Results

Metabolically unhealthy subjects were more prone to decreased lung function compared with their metabolically healthy counterparts, regardless of obesity status. When multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed according to quartiles of forced vital capacity (FVC) or forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (% pred), after adjusting for age, sex, and smoking status, odds ratio (OR) for the lowest FVC and FEV1 (% pred) quartiles were significantly higher in MUHO subjects (1.788 [95% CI, 1.531–2.089] and 1.603 [95% CI, 1.367–1.881]) and lower in MHO subjects (0.768 [95% CI, 0.654–0.902] and 0.826 [95% CI, 0.700–0.976]) with MHNO group as the reference, when OR for highest FVC and FEV1 quartiles were considered as 1.0

Conclusion

Metabolic health is more closely associated with impaired lung function than obesity.

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<![CDATA[The association between HIV infection and pulmonary function in a rural African population]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c478c4bd5eed0c484bd1604

Objectives

HIV infection has been associated with an impaired lung function in high-income countries, but the association between HIV infection and pulmonary function in Sub-Saharan Africa remains unclear. This study aims to investigate the relation between HIV infection and pulmonary function in a rural African population.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV-positive and HIV-negative adults in a rural area in South Africa, as part of the Ndlovu Cohort Study. A respiratory questionnaire and post-bronchodilator spirometry were performed. Multivariable regression analysis was used to investigate whether HIV was independently associated with a decrease in post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio considering age, sex, body mass index, respiratory risk factors and a history of a pulmonary infection (tuberculosis (TB) or a pneumonia). Possible mediation by a history of pulmonary infection was tested by removing this variable from the final model.

Results

Two hundred and one consecutive participants were enrolled in the study in 2016, 84 (41.8%) were HIV-positive (82.1% on ART). The median age was 38 (IQR 29–51) years. Following multivariable analysis HIV was not significantly associated to a decline in post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio (β -0.017, p 0.18). However, upon removal of a history of a pulmonary infection from the final model HIV was significantly related to post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio, β -0.026, p 0.03.

Conclusions

Pulmonary function is affected by HIV infection which most likely results from co-infection with TB or other pneumonia. Further research should focus on the influence of a pulmonary infection, most notably TB, on pulmonary function, especially as the incidence of TB is high in HIV infection.

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<![CDATA[Airway obstruction and bronchial reactivity from age 1 month until 13 years in children with asthma: A prospective birth cohort study]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c3e5000d5eed0c484d7b47d

Background

Studies have shown that airway obstruction and increased bronchial reactivity are present in early life in children developing asthma, which challenges the dogma that airway inflammation leads to low lung function. Further studies are needed to explore whether low lung function and bronchial hyperreactivity are inherent traits increasing the risk of developing airway inflammation and asthmatic symptoms in order to establish timely primary preventive initiatives.

Methods and findings

We investigated 367 (89%) of the 411 children from the at-risk Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood 2000 (COPSAC2000) birth cohort born to mothers with asthma, who were assessed by spirometry and bronchial reactivity to methacholine from age 1 month, plethysmography and bronchial reversibility from age 3 years, cold dry air hyperventilation from age 4 years, and exercise challenge at age 7 years. The COPSAC pediatricians diagnosed and treated asthma based on symptom load, response to inhaled corticosteroid, and relapse after treatment withdrawal according to a standardized algorithm. Repeated measures mixed models were applied to analyze lung function trajectories in children with asthma ever or never at age 1 month to 13 years. The number of children ever versus never developing asthma in their first 13 years of life was 97 (27%) versus 270 (73%), respectively. Median age at diagnosis was 2.0 years (IQR 1.2–5.7), and median remission age was 6.2 years (IQR 4.2–7.8). Children with versus without asthma had reduced lung function (z-score difference, forced expiratory volume, −0.31 [95% CI −0.47; −0.15], p < 0.001), increased airway resistance (z-score difference, specific airway resistance, +0.40 [95% CI +0.24; +0.56], p < 0.001), increased bronchial reversibility (difference in change in forced expiratory volume in the first second [ΔFEV1], +3% [95% CI +2%; +4%], p < 0.001), increased reactivity to methacholine (z-score difference for provocative dose, −0.40 [95% CI −0.58; −0.22], p < 0.001), decreased forced expiratory volume at cold dry air challenge (ΔFEV1, −4% [95% CI −7%; −1%], p < 0.01), and decreased forced expiratory volume after exercise (ΔFEV1, −4% [95% CI −7%; −1%], p = 0.02). Both airway obstruction and bronchial hyperreactivity were present before symptom debut, independent of disease duration, and did not improve with symptom remission. The generalizability of these findings may be limited by the high-risk nature of the cohort (all mothers had a diagnosis of asthma), the modest study size, and limited ethnic variation.

Conclusions

Children with asthma at some point at age 1 month to 13 years had airway obstruction and bronchial hyperreactivity before symptom debut, which did not worsen with increased asthma symptom duration or attenuate with remission. This suggests that airway obstruction and bronchial hyperreactivity are stable traits of childhood asthma since neonatal life, implying that symptomatic disease may in part be a consequence of these traits but not their cause.

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<![CDATA[Towards quantitative perfusion MRI of the lung in COPD: The problem of short-term repeatability]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c18138dd5eed0c48477538a

Purpose

4D perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intravenous injection of contrast agent allows for a radiation-free assessment of regional lung function. It is therefore a valuable method to monitor response to treatment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study was designed to evaluate its potential for monitoring short-term response to hyperoxia in COPD patients.

Materials and methods

19 prospectively enrolled COPD patients (median age 66y) underwent paired dynamic contrast-enhanced 4D perfusion MRI within 35min, first breathing 100% oxygen (injection 1, O2) and then room air (injection 2, RA), which was repeated on two consecutive days (day 1 and 2). Post-processing software was employed to calculate mean transit time (MTT), pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and pulmonary blood flow (PBF), based on the indicator dilution theory, for the automatically segmented whole lung and 12 regions of equal volume.

Results

Comparing O2 with RA conditions, PBF and PBV were found to be significantly lower at O2, consistently on both days (p<10–8). Comparing day 2 to day 1, MTT was shorter by 0.59±0.63 s (p<10–8), PBF was higher by 22±80 ml/min/100ml (p<3·10–4), and PBV tended to be lower by 0.2±7.2 ml/100ml (p = 0.159) at both, RA and O2, conditions.

Conclusion

The second injection (RA) yielded higher PBF and PBV, which apparently contradicts the established hypothesis that hyperoxia increases lung perfusion. Quantification of 4D perfusion MRI by current software approaches may thus be limited by residual circulating contrast agent in the short-term and even the next day.

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<![CDATA[Automatic emphysema detection using weakly labeled HRCT lung images]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5bce3d2240307c69b197f503

Purpose

A method for automatically quantifying emphysema regions using High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) scans of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that does not require manually annotated scans for training is presented.

Methods

HRCT scans of controls and of COPD patients with diverse disease severity are acquired at two different centers. Textural features from co-occurrence matrices and Gaussian filter banks are used to characterize the lung parenchyma in the scans. Two robust versions of multiple instance learning (MIL) classifiers that can handle weakly labeled data, miSVM and MILES, are investigated. Weak labels give information relative to the emphysema without indicating the location of the lesions. The classifiers are trained with the weak labels extracted from the forced expiratory volume in one minute (FEV1) and diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO). At test time, the classifiers output a patient label indicating overall COPD diagnosis and local labels indicating the presence of emphysema. The classifier performance is compared with manual annotations made by two radiologists, a classical density based method, and pulmonary function tests (PFTs).

Results

The miSVM classifier performed better than MILES on both patient and emphysema classification. The classifier has a stronger correlation with PFT than the density based method, the percentage of emphysema in the intersection of annotations from both radiologists, and the percentage of emphysema annotated by one of the radiologists. The correlation between the classifier and the PFT is only outperformed by the second radiologist.

Conclusions

The presented method uses MIL classifiers to automatically identify emphysema regions in HRCT scans. Furthermore, this approach has been demonstrated to correlate better with DLCO than a classical density based method or a radiologist, which is known to be affected in emphysema. Therefore, it is relevant to facilitate assessment of emphysema and to reduce inter-observer variability.

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<![CDATA[Correlation of Apical Fluid-Regulating Channel Proteins with Lung Function in Human COPD Lungs]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da9bab0ee8fa60ba3dc9

Links between epithelial ion channels and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are emerging through animal model and in vitro studies. However, clinical correlations between fluid-regulating channel proteins and lung function in COPD remain to be elucidated. To quantitatively measure epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and aquaporin 5 (AQP5) proteins in human COPD lungs and to analyze the correlation with declining lung function, quantitative western blots were used. Spearman tests were performed to identify correlations between channel proteins and lung function. The expression of α and β ENaC subunits was augmented and inversely associated with lung function. In contrast, both total and alveolar type I (ATI) and II (ATII)-specific CFTR proteins were reduced. The expression level of CFTR proteins was associated with FEV1 positively. Abundance of AQP5 proteins and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) was decreased and correlated with spirometry test results and gas exchange positively. Furthermore, these channel proteins were significantly associated with severity of disease. Our study demonstrates that expression of ENaC, AQP5, and CFTR proteins in human COPD lungs is quantitatively associated with lung function and severity of COPD. These apically located fluid-regulating channels may thereby serve as biomarkers and potent druggable targets of COPD.

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<![CDATA[Emphysema in active farmer’s lung disease]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5fab0ee8fa60be1076

Background

Farmer’s lung (FL) is a common type of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. It is often considered that fibrosis is the most frequent finding in chronic FL. Nevertheless, three cohort studies have suggested that some patients with chronic FL may develop emphysema. We aimed to evaluate the current prevalence of emphysema in active FL, to describe the radiological and functional features of emphysema in active FL, and to identify risk factors associated with emphysema in this population.

Methods

Patients aged over 18 years with active FL were prospectively recruited through the SOPHIA study (CPP Est; P-2009-521), between 2007 and 2015. Each patient had complete medical history screening, clinical examination, high resolution computed tomodensitometry, bronchoalveolar lavage, pulmonary function tests and serum precipitins.

Results

Among 33 patients with active FL, the prevalence of emphysema in this series of incident active FL cases was higher (48.5%) than that of fibrosis (12%) and was not dependent on smoking habits. Most patients with emphysema did not have lung hyperinflation. The possible risk factors for emphysema in active FL were a longer duration of exposure to organic dusts, and at a higher level.

Conclusion

Emphysema is found in half of patients with active FL and may be influenced by exposure patterns.

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<![CDATA[Intratracheal Instillation of High Dose Adenoviral Vectors Is Sufficient to Induce Lung Injury and Fibrosis in Mice]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db3aab0ee8fa60bd4a58

Rationale

Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) vectors are common tools in gene therapy. Since Ad vectors are known to activate innate and adaptive immunity, we investigated whether intratracheal administration of Ad vectors alone is sufficient to induce lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis.

Methods

We instilled Ad viruses ranging from 107 to 1.625×109 ifu/mouse as well as the same volume of PBS and bleomycin. 14 and 21 days after administration, we collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and mouse lung tissues. We measured the protein concentration, total and differential cell counts, and TGF-β1 production, performed Trichrome staining and Sircol assay, determined gene and protein levels of profibrotic cytokines, MMPs, and Wnt signaling proteins, and conducted TUNEL staining and co-immunofluorescence for GFP and α-SMA staining.

Results

Instillation of high dose Ad vectors (1.625×109 ifu/mouse) into mouse lungs induced high levels of protein content, inflammatory cells, and TGF-β1 in BALF, comparable to those in bleomycin-instilled lungs. The collagen content and mRNA levels of Col1a1, Col1a2, PCNA, and α-SMA were also increased in the lungs. Instillation of both bleomycin and Ad vectors increased expression levels of TNFα and IL-1β but not IL-10. Instillation of bleomycin but not Ad increased the expression of IL-1α, IL-13 and IL-16. Treatment with bleomycin or Ad vectors increased expression levels of integrin α1, α5, and αv, MMP9, whereas treatment with bleomycin but not Ad vectors induced MMP2 expression levels. Both bleomycin and Ad vectors induced mRNA levels of Wnt2, 2b, 5b, and Lrp6. Intratracheal instillation of Ad viruses also induced DNA damages and Ad viral infection-mediated fibrosis is not limited to the infection sites.

Conclusions

Our results suggest that administration of Ad vectors induces an inflammatory response, lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis in a dose dependent manner.

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<![CDATA[Stochastic Tracking of Infection in a CF Lung]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989dafdab0ee8fa60bc56d5

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) scan are the two ubiquitous imaging sources that physicians use to diagnose patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) or any other Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Unfortunately the cost constraints limit the frequent usage of these medical imaging procedures. In addition, even though both CT scan and MRI provide mesoscopic details of a lung, in order to obtain microscopic information a very high resolution is required. Neither MRI nor CT scans provide micro level information about the location of infection in a binary tree structure the binary tree structure of the human lung. In this paper we present an algorithm that enhances the current imaging results by providing estimated micro level information concerning the location of the infection. The estimate is based on a calculation of the distribution of possible mucus blockages consistent with available information using an offline Metropolis-Hastings algorithm in combination with a real-time interpolation scheme. When supplemented with growth rates for the pockets of mucus, the algorithm can also be used to estimate how lung functionality as manifested in spirometric tests will change in patients with CF or COPD.

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<![CDATA[PO2 Cycling Reduces Diaphragm Fatigue by Attenuating ROS Formation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da23ab0ee8fa60b7fa67

Prolonged muscle exposure to low PO2 conditions may cause oxidative stress resulting in severe muscular injuries. We hypothesize that PO2 cycling preconditioning, which involves brief cycles of diaphragmatic muscle exposure to a low oxygen level (40 Torr) followed by a high oxygen level (550 Torr), can reduce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as attenuate muscle fatigue in mouse diaphragm under low PO2. Accordingly, dihydrofluorescein (a fluorescent probe) was used to monitor muscular ROS production in real time with confocal microscopy during a lower PO2 condition. In the control group with no PO2 cycling, intracellular ROS formation did not appear during the first 15 min of the low PO2 period. However, after 20 min of low PO2, ROS levels increased significantly by ∼30% compared to baseline, and this increase continued until the end of the 30 min low PO2 condition. Conversely, muscles treated with PO2 cycling showed a complete absence of enhanced fluorescence emission throughout the entire low PO2 period. Furthermore, PO2 cycling-treated diaphragm exhibited increased fatigue resistance during prolonged low PO2 period compared to control. Thus, our data suggest that PO2 cycling mitigates diaphragm fatigue during prolonged low PO2. Although the exact mechanism for this protection remains to be elucidated, it is likely that through limiting excessive ROS levels, PO2 cycling initiates ROS-related antioxidant defenses.

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<![CDATA[An automated and reliable method for breath detection during variable mask pressures in awake and sleeping humans]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5eab0ee8fa60be0b1f

Accurate breath detection is crucial in sleep and respiratory physiology research and in several clinical settings. However, this process is technically challenging due to measurement and physiological artifacts and other factors such as variable leaks in the breathing circuit. Recently developed techniques to quantify the multiple causes of obstructive sleep apnea, require intermittent changes in airway pressure applied to a breathing mask. This presents an additional unique challenge for breath detection. Traditional algorithms often require drift correction. However, this is an empirical operation potentially prone to human error. This paper presents a new algorithm for breath detection during variable mask pressures in awake and sleeping humans based on physiological landmarks detected in the airflow or epiglottic pressure signal (Pepi). The algorithms were validated using simulated data from a mathematical model and against the standard visual detection approach in 4 healthy individuals and 6 patients with sleep apnea during variable mask pressure conditions. Using the flow signal, the algorithm correctly identified 97.6% of breaths with a mean difference±SD in the onsets of respiratory phase compared to expert visual detection of 23±89ms for inspiration and 6±56ms for expiration during wakefulness and 10±74ms for inspiration and 3±28 ms for expiration with variable mask pressures during sleep. Using the Pepi signal, the algorithm correctly identified 89% of the breaths with accuracy of 31±156ms for inspiration and 9±147ms for expiration compared to expert visual detection during variable mask pressures asleep. The algorithm had excellent performance in response to baseline drifts and noise during variable mask pressure conditions. This new algorithm can be used for accurate breath detection including during variable mask pressure conditions which represents a major advance over existing time-consuming manual approaches.

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<![CDATA[Xenon-Enhanced Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db54ab0ee8fa60bdd036

Background

Little has been reported on the feasibility of xenon-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (Xe-DECT) in the visual and quantitative analysis of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE).

Objectives

We compared CPFE with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as correlation with parameters of pulmonary function tests (PFTs).

Methods

Studied in 3 groups were 25 patients with CPFE, 25 with IPF without emphysema (IPF alone), 30 with COPD. Xe-DECT of the patients’ entire thorax was taken from apex to base after a patient’s single deep inspiration of 35% stable nonradioactive xenon. The differences in several parameters of PFTs and percentage of areas enhanced by xenon between 3 groups were compared and analyzed retrospectively.

Results

The percentage of areas enhanced by xenon in both lungs were calculated as CPFE/IPF alone/COPD = 72.2 ± 15.1% / 82.2 ± 14.7% /45.2 ± 23.2%, respectively. In the entire patients, the percentage of areas enhanced by xenon showed significantly a positive correlation with FEV1/FVC (R = 0.558, P < 0.0001) and %FEV1, (R = 0.528, P < 0.0001) and a negative correlation with %RV (R = -0.594, P < 0.0001) and RV/TLC (R = -0.579, P < 0.0001). The percentage of areas enhanced by xenon in patients with CPFE showed significantly a negative correlation with RV/TLC (R = -0.529, P = 0.007). Xenon enhancement of CPFE indicated 3 different patterns such as upper predominant, diffuse, and multifocal defect. The percentage of areas enhanced by xenon in upper predominant defect pattern was significantly higher than that in diffuse defect and multifocal defect pattern among these 3 different patterns in CPFE.

Conclusion

The percentage of areas enhanced by xenon demonstrated strong correlations with obstructive ventilation impairment. Therefore, we conclude that Xe-DECT may be useful for distinguishing emphysema lesion from fibrotic lesion in CPFE.

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