ResearchPad - pyramidal-cells https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[Low-rate firing limit for neurons with axon, soma and dendrites driven by spatially distributed stochastic synapses]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_13830 Neurons are extended cells with multiple branching dendrites, a cell body and an axon. In an active neuronal network, neurons receive vast numbers of incoming synaptic pulses throughout their dendrites and cell body that each exhibit significant variability in amplitude and arrival time. The resulting synaptic input causes voltage fluctuations throughout their structure that evolve in space and time. The dynamics of how these signals are integrated and how they ultimately trigger outgoing spikes have been modelled extensively since the late 1960s. However, until relatively recently the majority of the mathematical formulae describing how fluctuating synaptic drive triggers action potentials have been applicable only for small neurons with the dendritic and axonal structure ignored. This has been largely due to the mathematical complexity of including the effects of spatially distributed synaptic input. Here we show that in a physiologically relevant, low-firing-rate regime, an approximate level-crossing approach can be used to provide an estimate for the neuronal firing rate even when the dendrites and axons are included. We illustrate this approach using basic neuronal morphologies that capture the fundamentals of neuronal structure. Though the models are simple, these preliminary results show that it is possible to obtain useful formulae that capture the effects of spatially distributed synaptic drive. The generality of these results suggests they will provide a mathematical framework for future studies that might require the structure of neurons to be taken into account, such as the effect of electrical fields or multiple synaptic input streams that target distinct spatial domains of cortical pyramidal cells.

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<![CDATA[Tuft dendrites of pyramidal neurons operate as feedback-modulated functional subunits]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c897706d5eed0c4847d22c8

Dendrites of pyramidal cells exhibit complex morphologies and contain a variety of ionic conductances, which generate non-trivial integrative properties. Basal and proximal apical dendrites have been shown to function as independent computational subunits within a two-layer feedforward processing scheme. The outputs of the subunits are linearly summed and passed through a final non-linearity. It is an open question whether this mathematical abstraction can be applied to apical tuft dendrites as well. Using a detailed compartmental model of CA1 pyramidal neurons and a novel theoretical framework based on iso-response methods, we first show that somatic sub-threshold responses to brief synaptic inputs cannot be described by a two-layer feedforward model. Then, we relax the core assumption of subunit independence and introduce non-linear feedback from the output layer to the subunit inputs. We find that additive feedback alone explains the somatic responses to synaptic inputs to most of the branches in the apical tuft. Individual dendritic branches bidirectionally modulate the thresholds of their input-output curves without significantly changing the gains. In contrast to these findings for precisely timed inputs, we show that neuronal computations based on firing rates can be accurately described by purely feedforward two-layer models. Our findings support the view that dendrites of pyramidal neurons possess non-linear analog processing capabilities that critically depend on the location of synaptic inputs. The iso-response framework proposed in this computational study is highly efficient and could be directly applied to biological neurons.

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<![CDATA[The primate-specific peptide Y-P30 regulates morphological maturation of neocortical dendritic spines]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6dca0bd5eed0c48452a6fd

The 30-amino acid peptide Y-P30 corresponds to the N-terminus of the primate-specific, sweat gland-derived dermcidin prepropeptide. Previous work has revealed that Y-P30 enhances the interaction of pleiotrophin and syndecans-2/3, and thus represents a natural ligand to study this signaling pathway. In immature neurons, Y-P30 activates the c-Src and p42/44 ERK kinase pathway, increases the amount of F-actin in axonal growth cones, and promotes neuronal survival, cell migration and axonal elongation. The action of Y-P30 on axonal growth requires syndecan-3 and heparan sulfate side chains. Whether Y-P30 has the potential to influence dendrites and dendritic protrusions has not been explored. The latter is suggested by the observations that syndecan-2 expression increases during postnatal development, that syndecan-2 becomes enriched in dendritic spines, and that overexpression of syndecan-2 in immature neurons results in a premature morphological maturation of dendritic spines. Here, analysing rat cortical pyramidal and non-pyramidal neurons in organotypic cultures, we show that Y-P30 does not alter the development of the dendritic arborization patterns. However, Y-P30 treatment decreases the density of apical, but not basal dendritic protrusions at the expense of the filopodia. Analysis of spine morphology revealed an unchanged mushroom/stubby-to-thin spine ratio and a shortening of the longest decile of dendritic protrusions. Whole-cell recordings from cortical principal neurons in dissociated cultures grown in the presence of Y-P30 demonstrated a decrease in the frequency of glutamatergic mEPSCs. Despite these differences in protrusion morphology and synaptic transmission, the latter likely attributable to presynaptic effects, calcium event rate and amplitude recorded in pyramidal neurons in organotypic cultures were not altered by Y-P30 treatment. Together, our data suggest that Y-P30 has the capacity to decelerate spinogenesis and to promote morphological, but not synaptic, maturation of dendritic protrusions.

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<![CDATA[Early alterations in hippocampal perisomatic GABAergic synapses and network oscillations in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease amyloidosis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c478c3dd5eed0c484bd1017

Several lines of evidence imply changes in inhibitory interneuron connectivity and subsequent alterations in oscillatory network activities in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Recently, we provided evidence for an increased immunoreactivity of both the postsynaptic scaffold protein gephyrin and the GABAA receptor γ2-subunit in the hippocampus of young (1 and 3 months of age), APPPS1 mice. These mice represent a well-established model of cerebral amyloidosis, which is a hallmark of human AD. In this study, we demonstrate a robust increase of parvalbumin immunoreactivity and accentuated projections of parvalbumin positive (PV+) interneurons, which target perisomatic regions of pyramidal cells within the hippocampal subregions CA1 and CA3 of 3-month-old APPPS1 mice. Colocalisation studies confirmed a significant increase in the density of PV+ projections labeled with antibodies against a presynaptic (vesicular GABA transporter) and a postsynaptic marker (gephyrin) of inhibitory synapses within the pyramidal cell layer of CA1 and CA3. As perisomatic inhibition by PV+-interneurons is crucial for the generation of hippocampal network oscillations involved in spatial processing, learning and memory formation we investigated the impact of the putative enhanced perisomatic inhibition on two types of fast neuronal network oscillations in acute hippocampal slices: 1. spontaneously occurring sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-R), and 2. cholinergic γ-oscillations. Interestingly, both network patterns were generally preserved in APPPS1 mice similar to WT mice. However, the comparison of simultaneous CA3 and CA1 recordings revealed that the incidence and amplitude of SPW-Rs were significantly lower in CA1 vs CA3 in APPPS1 slices, whereas the power of γ-oscillations was significantly higher in CA3 vs CA1 in WT-slices indicating an impaired communication between the CA3 and CA1 network activities in APPPS1 mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate an increased GABAergic synaptic output of PV+ interneurons impinging on pyramidal cells of CA1 and CA3, which might limit the coordinated cross-talk between these two hippocampal areas in young APPPS1 mice and mediate long-term changes in synaptic inhibition during progression of amyloidosis.

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<![CDATA[Using computational models to predict in vivo synaptic inputs to interneuron specific 3 (IS3) cells of CA1 hippocampus that also allow their recruitment during rhythmic states]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c3e50b5d5eed0c484d84993

Brain coding strategies are enabled by the balance of synaptic inputs that individual neurons receive as determined by the networks in which they reside. Inhibitory cell types contribute to brain function in distinct ways but recording from specific, inhibitory cell types during behaviour to determine their contributions is highly challenging. In particular, the in vivo activities of vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing interneuron specific 3 (IS3) cells in the hippocampus that only target other inhibitory cells are unknown at present. We perform a massive, computational exploration of possible synaptic inputs to IS3 cells using multi-compartment models and optimized synaptic parameters. We find that asynchronous, in vivo-like states that are sensitive to additional theta-timed inputs (8 Hz) exist when excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances are approximately equally balanced and with low numbers of activated synapses receiving correlated inputs. Specifically, under these balanced conditions, the input resistance is larger with higher mean spike firing rates relative to other activated synaptic conditions investigated. Incoming theta-timed inputs result in strongly increased spectral power relative to baseline. Thus, using a generally applicable computational approach we predict the existence and features of background, balanced states in hippocampal circuits.

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<![CDATA[Heterogeneous firing responses predict diverse couplings to presynaptic activity in mice layer V pyramidal neurons]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db5aab0ee8fa60bdf258

In this study, we present a theoretical framework combining experimental characterizations and analytical calculus to capture the firing rate input-output properties of single neurons in the fluctuation-driven regime. Our framework consists of a two-step procedure to treat independently how the dendritic input translates into somatic fluctuation variables, and how the latter determine action potential firing. We use this framework to investigate the functional impact of the heterogeneity in firing responses found experimentally in young mice layer V pyramidal cells. We first design and calibrate in vitro a simplified morphological model of layer V pyramidal neurons with a dendritic tree following Rall's branching rule. Then, we propose an analytical derivation for the membrane potential fluctuations at the soma as a function of the properties of the synaptic input in dendrites. This mathematical description allows us to easily emulate various forms of synaptic input: either balanced, unbalanced, synchronized, purely proximal or purely distal synaptic activity. We find that those different forms of dendritic input activity lead to various impact on the somatic membrane potential fluctuations properties, thus raising the possibility that individual neurons will differentially couple to specific forms of activity as a result of their different firing response. We indeed found such a heterogeneous coupling between synaptic input and firing response for all types of presynaptic activity. This heterogeneity can be explained by different levels of cellular excitability in the case of the balanced, unbalanced, synchronized and purely distal activity. A notable exception appears for proximal dendritic inputs: increasing the input level can either promote firing response in some cells, or suppress it in some other cells whatever their individual excitability. This behavior can be explained by different sensitivities to the speed of the fluctuations, which was previously associated to different levels of sodium channel inactivation and density. Because local network connectivity rather targets proximal dendrites, our results suggest that this aspect of biophysical heterogeneity might be relevant to neocortical processing by controlling how individual neurons couple to local network activity.

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<![CDATA[Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da38ab0ee8fa60b86ecb

Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.

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<![CDATA[Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db01ab0ee8fa60bc6de5

Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

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<![CDATA[Optogenetically Blocking Sharp Wave Ripple Events in Sleep Does Not Interfere with the Formation of Stable Spatial Representation in the CA1 Area of the Hippocampus]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da11ab0ee8fa60b79adf

During hippocampal sharp wave/ripple (SWR) events, previously occurring, sensory input-driven neuronal firing patterns are replayed. Such replay is thought to be important for plasticity-related processes and consolidation of memory traces. It has previously been shown that the electrical stimulation-induced disruption of SWR events interferes with learning in rodents in different experimental paradigms. On the other hand, the cognitive map theory posits that the plastic changes of the firing of hippocampal place cells constitute the electrophysiological counterpart of the spatial learning, observable at the behavioral level. Therefore, we tested whether intact SWR events occurring during the sleep/rest session after the first exploration of a novel environment are needed for the stabilization of the CA1 code, which process requires plasticity. We found that the newly-formed representation in the CA1 has the same level of stability with optogenetic SWR blockade as with a control manipulation that delivered the same amount of light into the brain. Therefore our results suggest that at least in the case of passive exploratory behavior, SWR-related plasticity is dispensable for the stability of CA1 ensembles.

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<![CDATA[Electrosensory neural responses to natural electro-communication stimuli are distributed along a continuum]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db51ab0ee8fa60bdc238

Neural heterogeneities are seen ubiquitously within the brain and greatly complicate classification efforts. Here we tested whether the responses of an anatomically well-characterized sensory neuron population to natural stimuli could be used for functional classification. To do so, we recorded from pyramidal cells within the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) of the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus in response to natural electro-communication stimuli as these cells can be anatomically classified into six different types. We then used two independent methodologies to functionally classify responses: one relies of reducing the dimensionality of a feature space while the other directly compares the responses themselves. Both methodologies gave rise to qualitatively similar results: while ON and OFF-type cells could easily be distinguished from one another, ELL pyramidal neuron responses are actually distributed along a continuum rather than forming distinct clusters due to heterogeneities. We discuss the implications of our results for neural coding and highlight some potential advantages.

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<![CDATA[Optimal Current Transfer in Dendrites]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da10ab0ee8fa60b79509

Integration of synaptic currents across an extensive dendritic tree is a prerequisite for computation in the brain. Dendritic tapering away from the soma has been suggested to both equalise contributions from synapses at different locations and maximise the current transfer to the soma. To find out how this is achieved precisely, an analytical solution for the current transfer in dendrites with arbitrary taper is required. We derive here an asymptotic approximation that accurately matches results from numerical simulations. From this we then determine the diameter profile that maximises the current transfer to the soma. We find a simple quadratic form that matches diameters obtained experimentally, indicating a fundamental architectural principle of the brain that links dendritic diameters to signal transmission.

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<![CDATA[Mathematical model of Na-K-Cl homeostasis in ictal and interictal discharges]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c955230d5eed0c4846f30ea

Despite big experimental data on the phenomena and mechanisms of the generation of ictal and interictal discharges (IDs and IIDs), mathematical models that can describe the synaptic interactions of neurons and the ionic dynamics in biophysical detail are not well-established. Based on experimental recordings of combined hippocampal-entorhinal cortex slices from rats in a high-potassium and a low-magnesium solution containing 4-aminopyridine as well as previous observations of similar experimental models, this type of mathematical model has been developed. The model describes neuronal excitation through the application of the conductance-based refractory density approach for three neuronal populations: two populations of glutamatergic neurons with hyperpolarizing and depolarizing GABAergic synapses and one GABAergic population. The ionic dynamics account for the contributions of voltage-gated and synaptic channels, active and passive transporters, and diffusion. The relatively slow dynamics of potassium, chloride, and sodium ion concentrations determine the transitions from pure GABAergic IIDs to IDs and GABA-glutamatergic IIDs. The model reproduces different types of IIDs, including those initiated by interneurons; repetitive IDs; tonic and bursting modes of an ID composed of clustered IID-like events. The simulations revealed contributions from different ionic channels to the ion concentration dynamics before and during ID generation. The proposed model is a step forward to an optimal mathematical description of the mechanisms of epileptic discharges.

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<![CDATA[Morphological Characteristics of Electrophysiologically Characterized Layer Vb Pyramidal Cells in Rat Barrel Cortex]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e3ab0ee8fa60b6a2e8

Layer Vb pyramidal cells are the major output neurons of the neocortex and transmit the outcome of cortical columnar signal processing to distant target areas. At the same time they contribute to local tactile information processing by emitting recurrent axonal collaterals into the columnar microcircuitry. It is, however, not known how exactly the two types of pyramidal cells, called slender-tufted and thick-tufted, contribute to the local circuitry. Here, we investigated in the rat barrel cortex the detailed quantitative morphology of biocytin-filled layer Vb pyramidal cells in vitro, which were characterized for their intrinsic electrophysiology with special emphasis on their action potential firing pattern. Since we stained the same slices for cytochrome oxidase, we could also perform layer- and column-related analyses. Our results suggest that in layer Vb the unambiguous action potential firing patterns "regular spiking (RS)" and "repetitive burst spiking (RB)" (previously called intrinsically burst spiking) correlate well with a distinct morphology. RS pyramidal cells are somatodendritically of the slender-tufted type and possess numerous local intralaminar and intracolumnar axonal collaterals, mostly reaching layer I. By contrast, their transcolumnar projections are less well developed. The RB pyramidal cells are somatodendritically of the thick-tufted type and show only relatively sparse local axonal collaterals, which are preferentially emitted as long horizontal or oblique infragranular collaterals. However, contrary to many previous slice studies, a substantial number of these neurons also showed axonal collaterals reaching layer I. Thus, electrophysiologically defined pyramidal cells of layer Vb show an input and output pattern which suggests RS cells to be more "locally segregating" signal processors whereas RB cells seem to act more on a "global integrative" scale.

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<![CDATA[Assessment of Methods for the Intracellular Blockade of GABAA Receptors]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989da4eab0ee8fa60b8d69d

Selective blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto specific neurons is a useful tool for dissecting the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components of ongoing network activity. To achieve this, intracellular recording with a patch solution capable of blocking GABAA receptors has advantages over other manipulations, such as pharmacological application of GABAergic antagonists or optogenetic inhibition of populations of interneurones, in that the majority of inhibitory transmission is unaffected and hence the remaining network activity preserved. Here, we assess three previously described methods to block inhibition: intracellular application of the molecules picrotoxin, 4,4’-dinitro-stilbene-2,2’-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4’-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2’-disulphonic acid (DIDS). DNDS and picrotoxin were both found to be ineffective at blocking evoked, monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) onto mouse CA1 pyramidal cells. An intracellular solution containing DIDS and caesium fluoride, but lacking nucleotides ATP and GTP, was effective at decreasing the amplitude of IPSCs. However, this effect was found to be independent of DIDS, and the absence of intracellular nucleotides, and was instead due to the presence of fluoride ions in this intracellular solution, which also blocked spontaneously occurring IPSCs during hippocampal sharp waves. Critically, intracellular fluoride ions also caused a decrease in both spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic currents and precluded the inclusion of nucleotides in the intracellular solution. Therefore, of the methods tested, only fluoride ions were effective for intracellular blockade of IPSCs but this approach has additional cellular effects reducing its selectivity and utility.

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<![CDATA[Competitive tuning: Competition's role in setting the frequency-dependence of Ca2+-dependent proteins]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5ab1848c463d7e5ca175d91a

A number of neurological disorders arise from perturbations in biochemical signaling and protein complex formation within neurons. Normally, proteins form networks that when activated produce persistent changes in a synapse’s molecular composition. In hippocampal neurons, calcium ion (Ca2+) flux through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors activates Ca2+/calmodulin signal transduction networks that either increase or decrease the strength of the neuronal synapse, phenomena known as long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD), respectively. The calcium-sensor calmodulin (CaM) acts as a common activator of the networks responsible for both LTP and LTD. This is possible, in part, because CaM binding proteins are “tuned” to different Ca2+ flux signals by their unique binding and activation dynamics. Computational modeling is used to describe the binding and activation dynamics of Ca2+/CaM signal transduction and can be used to guide focused experimental studies. Although CaM binds over 100 proteins, practical limitations cause many models to include only one or two CaM-activated proteins. In this work, we view Ca2+/CaM as a limiting resource in the signal transduction pathway owing to its low abundance relative to its binding partners. With this view, we investigate the effect of competitive binding on the dynamics of CaM binding partner activation. Using an explicit model of Ca2+, CaM, and seven highly-expressed hippocampal CaM binding proteins, we find that competition for CaM binding serves as a tuning mechanism: the presence of competitors shifts and sharpens the Ca2+ frequency-dependence of CaM binding proteins. Notably, we find that simulated competition may be sufficient to recreate the in vivo frequency dependence of the CaM-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. Additionally, competition alone (without feedback mechanisms or spatial parameters) could replicate counter-intuitive experimental observations of decreased activation of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II in knockout models of neurogranin. We conclude that competitive tuning could be an important dynamic process underlying synaptic plasticity.

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<![CDATA[Wiring Economy of Pyramidal Cells in the Juvenile Rat Somatosensory Cortex]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9edab0ee8fa60b6d4e9

Ever since Cajal hypothesized that the structure of neurons is designed in such a way as to save space, time and matter, numerous researchers have analyzed wiring properties at different scales of brain organization. Here we test the hypothesis that individual pyramidal cells, the most abundant type of neuron in the cerebral cortex, optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. In this study, we analyze the neuronal wiring of complete basal arborizations of pyramidal neurons in layer II, III, IV, Va, Vb and VI of the hindlimb somatosensory cortical region of postnatal day 14 rats. For each cell, we search for the optimal basal arborization and compare its length with the length of the real dendritic structure. Here the optimal arborization is defined as the arborization that has the shortest total wiring length provided that all neuron bifurcations are respected and the extent of the dendritic arborizations remain unchanged. We use graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques to search for the minimal wiring arborizations. Despite morphological differences between pyramidal neurons located in different cortical layers, we found that the neuronal wiring is near-optimal in all cases (the biggest difference between the shortest synthetic wiring found for a dendritic arborization and the length of its real wiring was less than 5%). We found, however, that the real neuronal wiring was significantly closer to the best solution found in layers II, III and IV. Our studies show that the wiring economy of cortical neurons is related not to the type of neurons or their morphological complexities but to general wiring economy principles.

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<![CDATA[The basis of sharp spike onset in standard biophysical models]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989db59ab0ee8fa60bdf0d8

In most vertebrate neurons, spikes initiate in the axonal initial segment (AIS). When recorded in the soma, they have a surprisingly sharp onset, as if sodium (Na) channels opened abruptly. The main view stipulates that spikes initiate in a conventional manner at the distal end of the AIS, then progressively sharpen as they backpropagate to the soma. We examined the biophysical models used to substantiate this view, and we found that spikes do not initiate through a local axonal current loop that propagates along the axon, but through a global current loop encompassing the AIS and soma, which forms an electrical dipole. Therefore, the phenomenon is not adequately modeled as the backpropagation of an electrical wave along the axon, since the wavelength would be as large as the entire system. Instead, in these models, we found that spike initiation rather follows the critical resistive coupling model proposed recently, where the Na current entering the AIS is matched by the axial resistive current flowing to the soma. Besides demonstrating it by examining the balance of currents at spike initiation, we show that the observed increase in spike sharpness along the axon is artifactual and disappears when an appropriate measure of rapidness is used; instead, somatic onset rapidness can be predicted from spike shape at initiation site. Finally, we reproduce the phenomenon in a two-compartment model, showing that it does not rely on propagation. In these models, the sharp onset of somatic spikes is therefore not an artifact of observing spikes at the incorrect location, but rather the signature that spikes are initiated through a global soma-AIS current loop forming an electrical dipole.

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<![CDATA[A Detailed Data-Driven Network Model of Prefrontal Cortex Reproduces Key Features of In Vivo Activity]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5989d9e5ab0ee8fa60b6b209

The prefrontal cortex is centrally involved in a wide range of cognitive functions and their impairment in psychiatric disorders. Yet, the computational principles that govern the dynamics of prefrontal neural networks, and link their physiological, biochemical and anatomical properties to cognitive functions, are not well understood. Computational models can help to bridge the gap between these different levels of description, provided they are sufficiently constrained by experimental data and capable of predicting key properties of the intact cortex. Here, we present a detailed network model of the prefrontal cortex, based on a simple computationally efficient single neuron model (simpAdEx), with all parameters derived from in vitro electrophysiological and anatomical data. Without additional tuning, this model could be shown to quantitatively reproduce a wide range of measures from in vivo electrophysiological recordings, to a degree where simulated and experimentally observed activities were statistically indistinguishable. These measures include spike train statistics, membrane potential fluctuations, local field potentials, and the transmission of transient stimulus information across layers. We further demonstrate that model predictions are robust against moderate changes in key parameters, and that synaptic heterogeneity is a crucial ingredient to the quantitative reproduction of in vivo-like electrophysiological behavior. Thus, we have produced a physiologically highly valid, in a quantitative sense, yet computationally efficient PFC network model, which helped to identify key properties underlying spike time dynamics as observed in vivo, and can be harvested for in-depth investigation of the links between physiology and cognition.

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