ResearchPad - saccharomyces https://www.researchpad.co Default RSS Feed en-us © 2020 Newgen KnowledgeWorks <![CDATA[An Out-of-Patagonia migration explains the worldwide diversity and distribution of <i>Saccharomyces eubayanus</i> lineages]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14503 Lager yeast history has intrigued scientists for decades. The recent isolation of S. eubayanus, the lager yeast ancestor, represents an unprecedented opportunity to extend our knowledge on yeast phylogeography and the origins of the S. pastorianus lager hybrid. However, the genetic, phenotypic and evolutionary history of this species remains poorly known. Our work demonstrates that S. eubayanus isolates from Patagonia have the greatest genetic diversity, comprising the largest number of lineages within a single geographic region and experienced ancestral and recent admixture between lineages, likely suggesting co-occurrence in Patagonia. Importantly, some isolates exhibited significant phenotypic differences for traits such as high temperature and ethanol tolerance, together with fermentation performance, demonstrating their potential in the brewing industry for the generation of new styles of lager beers. Furthermore, our results support the idea of colonization from peripheral glacial refugia from the South, as responsible for the high genetic diversity observed in southern Chilean Patagonia. Our results allow hypothesizing a successful physiological adjustment of the species to the local conditions in Patagonia, explaining its wide distribution in the southern hemisphere.

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<![CDATA[The degradation-promoting roles of deubiquitinases Ubp6 and Ubp3 in cytosolic and ER protein quality control]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/elastic_article_14498 The quality control of intracellular proteins is achieved by degrading misfolded proteins which cannot be refolded by molecular chaperones. In eukaryotes, such degradation is handled primarily by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, it remained unclear whether and how protein quality control deploys various deubiquitinases. To address this question, we screened deletions or mutation of the 20 deubiquitinase genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and discovered that almost half of the mutations slowed the removal of misfolded proteins whereas none of the remaining mutations accelerated this process significantly. Further characterization revealed that Ubp6 maintains the level of free ubiquitin to promote the elimination of misfolded cytosolic proteins, while Ubp3 supports the degradation of misfolded cytosolic and ER luminal proteins by different mechanisms.

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<![CDATA[Host factors that promote retrotransposon integration are similar in distantly related eukaryotes]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5ab4e87b463d7e0cbd0422e6

Retroviruses and Long Terminal Repeat (LTR)-retrotransposons have distinct patterns of integration sites. The oncogenic potential of retrovirus-based vectors used in gene therapy is dependent on the selection of integration sites associated with promoters. The LTR-retrotransposon Tf1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is studied as a model for oncogenic retroviruses because it integrates into the promoters of stress response genes. Although integrases (INs) encoded by retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons are responsible for catalyzing the insertion of cDNA into the host genome, it is thought that distinct host factors are required for the efficiency and specificity of integration. We tested this hypothesis with a genome-wide screen of host factors that promote Tf1 integration. By combining an assay for transposition with a genetic assay that measures cDNA recombination we could identify factors that contribute differentially to integration. We utilized this assay to test a collection of 3,004 S. pombe strains with single gene deletions. Using these screens and immunoblot measures of Tf1 proteins, we identified a total of 61 genes that promote integration. The candidate integration factors participate in a range of processes including nuclear transport, transcription, mRNA processing, vesicle transport, chromatin structure and DNA repair. Two candidates, Rhp18 and the NineTeen complex were tested in two-hybrid assays and were found to interact with Tf1 IN. Surprisingly, a number of pathways we identified were found previously to promote integration of the LTR-retrotransposons Ty1 and Ty3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, indicating the contribution of host factors to integration are common in distantly related organisms. The DNA repair factors are of particular interest because they may identify the pathways that repair the single stranded gaps flanking the sites of strand transfer following integration of LTR retroelements.

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<![CDATA[Evolutionary behaviour of bacterial prion-like proteins]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c8823f7d5eed0c484639437

Prions in eukaryotes have been linked to diseases, evolutionary capacitance, large-scale genetic control and long-term memory formation. In bacteria, constructed prion-forming proteins have been described, such as the prion-forming protein recently described for Clostridium botulinum transcription terminator Rho. Here, I analyzed the evolution of the Rho prion-forming domain across bacteria, and discovered that its conservation is sporadic both in the Clostridium genus and in bacteria generally. Nonetheless, it has an apparent evolutionary reach into eight or more different bacterial phyla. Motivated by these results, I investigated whether this pattern of wide-ranging evolutionary sporadicity is typical of bacterial prion-like domains. A measure of coverage of a domain (C) within its evolutionary range was derived, which is effectively a weighted fraction of the number of species in which the domain is found. I observe that occurrence across multiple phyla is not uncommon for bacterial prion-like protein domain families, but that they tend to sample of a low fraction of species within their evolutionary range, like Rho. The Rho prion-like domain family is one of the top three most widely distributed prion-like protein domain families in terms of number of phyla. There are >60 prion-like protein domain families that have at least the evolutionary coverage of Rho, and are found in multiple phyla. The implications of these findings for evolution and for experimental investigations into prion-forming proteins are discussed.

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<![CDATA[A polyploid admixed origin of beer yeasts derived from European and Asian wine populations]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c88240dd5eed0c48463962a

Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae used to make beer, bread, and wine are genetically and phenotypically distinct from wild populations associated with trees. The origins of these domesticated populations are not always clear; human-associated migration and admixture with wild populations have had a strong impact on S. cerevisiae population structure. We examined the population genetic history of beer strains and found that ale strains and the S. cerevisiae portion of allotetraploid lager strains were derived from admixture between populations closely related to European grape wine strains and Asian rice wine strains. Similar to both lager and baking strains, ale strains are polyploid, providing them with a passive means of remaining isolated from other populations and providing us with a living relic of their ancestral hybridization. To reconstruct their polyploid origin, we phased the genomes of two ale strains and found ale haplotypes to both be recombinants between European and Asian alleles and to also contain novel alleles derived from extinct or as yet uncharacterized populations. We conclude that modern beer strains are the product of a historical melting pot of fermentation technology.

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<![CDATA[A rapid methods development workflow for high-throughput quantitative proteomic applications]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f152ed5eed0c48467ae98

Recent improvements in the speed and sensitivity of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have driven significant progress toward system-wide characterization of the proteome of many species. These efforts create large proteomic datasets that provide insight into biological processes and identify diagnostic proteins whose abundance changes significantly under different experimental conditions. Yet, these system-wide experiments are typically the starting point for hypothesis-driven, follow-up experiments to elucidate the extent of the phenomenon or the utility of the diagnostic marker, wherein many samples must be analyzed. Transitioning from a few discovery experiments to quantitative analyses on hundreds of samples requires significant resources both to develop sensitive and specific methods as well as analyze them in a high-throughput manner. To aid these efforts, we developed a workflow using data acquired from discovery proteomic experiments, retention time prediction, and standard-flow chromatography to rapidly develop targeted proteomic assays. We demonstrated this workflow by developing MRM assays to quantify proteins of multiple metabolic pathways from multiple microbes under different experimental conditions. With this workflow, one can also target peptides in scheduled/dynamic acquisition methods from a shotgun proteomic dataset downloaded from online repositories, validate with appropriate control samples or standard peptides, and begin analyzing hundreds of samples in only a few minutes.

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<![CDATA[The genetic intractability of Symbiodinium microadriaticum to standard algal transformation methods]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c75ac68d5eed0c484d08712

Modern transformation and genome editing techniques have shown great success across a broad variety of organisms. However, no study of successfully applied genome editing has been reported in a dinoflagellate despite the first genetic transformation of Symbiodinium being published about 20 years ago. Using an array of different available transformation techniques, we attempted to transform Symbiodinium microadriaticum (CCMP2467), a dinoflagellate symbiont of reef-building corals, with the view to performing subsequent CRISPR-Cas9 mediated genome editing. Plasmid vectors designed for nuclear transformation containing the chloramphenicol resistance gene under the control of the CaMV p35S promoter as well as several putative endogenous promoters were used to test a variety of transformation techniques including biolistics, electroporation and agitation with silicon carbide whiskers. Chloroplast-targeted transformation was attempted using an engineered Symbiodinium chloroplast minicircle encoding a modified PsbA protein expected to confer atrazine resistance. We report that we have been unable to confer chloramphenicol or atrazine resistance on Symbiodinium microadriaticum strain CCMP2467.

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<![CDATA[Isolation and identification of aroma producing strain with esterification capacity from yellow water]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6f1540d5eed0c48467af8c

Kaoliang is a refreshing fragranced type of Chinese spirits with slight apple fragrance that comes from ethyl acetate (EA). Special aromas are produced by esterification microorganisms, which affect the taste and quality of the wine. In this study, new yeast strains were isolated from yellow water, a by-product during fermentation process. Meanwhile, the optimal culture condition was determined for its growth and EA production. Three new strains, Kazachstaniaexigua, Candida humilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified from yellow water. Among these strains, S. cerevisiae S5 was the new and dominant strain. Results from response surface methodology showed that S. cerevisiae S5 produced 161.88 ppm of EA, in the medium with 4.91% yeast extract, 9.82% peptone, and 20.91% glucose after 96 hours of cultivation at 27.53°C. GC analysis showed that aroma compounds, such as EA, isoamyl acetate and 2-phenylethanol increased from the sample of optimal condition when compared to the one from initial fermentation condition.

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<![CDATA[Network hubs affect evolvability]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b52c6d5eed0c4842bcfcd

The regulatory processes in cells are typically organized into complex genetic networks. However, it is still unclear how this network structure modulates the evolution of cellular regulation. One would expect that mutations in central and highly connected modules of a network (so-called hubs) would often result in a breakdown and therefore be an evolutionary dead end. However, a new study by Koubkova-Yu and colleagues finds that in some circumstances, altering a hub can offer a quick evolutionary advantage. Specifically, changes in a hub can induce significant phenotypic changes that allow organisms to move away from a local fitness peak, whereas the fitness defects caused by the perturbed hub can be mitigated by mutations in its interaction partners. Together, the results demonstrate how network architecture shapes and facilitates evolutionary adaptation.

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<![CDATA[Environment-dependent pleiotropic effects of mutations on the maximum growth rate r and carrying capacity K of population growth]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e656d5eed0c484ef2c2a

Maximum growth rate per individual (r) and carrying capacity (K) are key life-history traits that together characterize the density-dependent population growth and therefore are crucial parameters of many ecological and evolutionary theories such as r/K selection. Although r and K are generally thought to correlate inversely, both r/K tradeoffs and trade-ups have been observed. Nonetheless, neither the conditions under which each of these relationships occur nor the causes of these relationships are fully understood. Here, we address these questions using yeast as a model system. We estimated r and K using the growth curves of over 7,000 yeast recombinants in nine environments and found that the rK correlation among genotypes changes from 0.53 to −0.52 with the rise of environment quality, measured by the mean r of all genotypes in the environment. We respectively mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for r and K in each environment. Many QTLs simultaneously influence r and K, but the directions of their effects are environment dependent such that QTLs tend to show concordant effects on the two traits in poor environments but antagonistic effects in rich environments. We propose that these contrasting trends are generated by the relative impacts of two factors—the tradeoff between the speed and efficiency of ATP production and the energetic cost of cell maintenance relative to reproduction—and demonstrate an agreement between model predictions and empirical observations. These results reveal and explain the complex environment dependency of the rK relationship, which bears on many ecological and evolutionary phenomena and has biomedical implications.

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<![CDATA[Genomic content of a novel yeast species Hanseniaspora gamundiae sp. nov. from fungal stromata (Cyttaria) associated with a unique fermented beverage in Andean Patagonia, Argentina]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b5290d5eed0c4842bcb8e

A novel yeast species was isolated from the sugar-rich stromata of Cyttaria hariotii collected from two different Nothofagus tree species in the Andean forests of Patagonia, Argentina. Phylogenetic analyses of the concatenated sequence of the rRNA gene sequences and the protein-coding genes for actin and translational elongation factor-1α indicated that the novel species belongs to the genus Hanseniaspora. De novo genome assembly of the strain CRUB 1928T yielded a 10.2-Mbp genome assembly predicted to encode 4452 protein-coding genes. The genome sequence data were compared to the genomes of other Hanseniaspora species using three different methods, an alignment-free distance measure, Kr, and two model-based estimations of DNA-DNA homology values, of which all provided indicative values to delineate species of Hanseniaspora. Given its potential role in a rare indigenous alcoholic beverage in which yeasts ferment sugars extracted from the stromata of Cytarria sp., we searched for the genes that may suggest adaptation of novel Hanseniaspora species to fermenting communities. The SSU1-like gene encoding a sulfite efflux pump, which, among Hanseniaspora, is present only in close relatives to the new species, was detected and analyzed, suggesting that this gene might be one factor that characterizes this novel species. We also discuss several candidate genes that likely underlie the physiological traits used for traditional taxonomic identification. Based on these results, a novel yeast species with the name Hanseniaspora gamundiae sp. nov. is proposed with CRUB 1928T (ex-types: ZIM 2545T = NRRL Y-63793T = PYCC 7262T; MycoBank number MB 824091) as the type strain. Furthermore, we propose the transfer of the Kloeckera species, K. hatyaiensis, K. lindneri and K. taiwanica to the genus Hanseniaspora as Hanseniaspora hatyaiensis comb. nov. (MB 828569), Hanseniaspora lindneri comb. nov. (MB 828566) and Hanseniaspora taiwanica comb. nov. (MB 828567).

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<![CDATA[The glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase PLAT2 functions in the generation of DHA-rich glycerolipids in Aurantiochytrium limacinum F26-b]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5b52aad5eed0c4842bcdd2

Thraustochytrids possess docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) as acyl chain(s) of triacylglycerol (TG) and phosphatidylcholine (PC), some of which contain multiple DHAs. However, little is known about how these DHA-rich glycerolipids are produced in thraustochytrids. In this study, we identified PLAT2 in Aurantiochytrium limacinum F26-b as a glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) acyltransferase (GPAT) by heterologous expression of the gene in budding yeast. Subsequently, we found that GPAT activity was reduced by disruption of the PLAT2 gene in A. limacinum, resulting in a decrease in DHA-containing lysophosphatidic acid (LPA 22:6). Conversely, overexpression of PLAT2 increased both GPAT activity and LPA 22:6. These results indicate that PLAT2 is a GPAT that transfers DHA to G3P in vivo as well as in vitro. Overexpression of the PLAT2 gene increased the production of a two DHA-containing diacylglycerol (DG 44:12), followed by an increase in the three DHA-containing TG (TG 66:18), two-DHA-containing TG (TG 60:12), and two DHA-containing PC (PC 44:12). However, overexpression of PLAT2 did not increase DHA-free DG (DG32:0), which was preferentially converted to three 16:0-containing TG (TG 48:0) but not two 16:0-containing PC (PC 32:0). Collectively, we revealed that DHA-rich glycerolipids are produced from a precursor, LPA 22:6, which is generated by incorporating DHA to G3P by PLAT2 in the A. limacinum.

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<![CDATA[Dissection of the regulatory role for the N-terminal domain in Candida albicans protein phosphatase Z1]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c5df31ad5eed0c484580d1d

The novel type, fungus specific protein phosphatase Z1 of the opportunistic pathogen, Candida albicans (CaPpz1) has several important physiological roles. It consists of a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain and a variable, intrinsically disordered, N-terminal regulatory domain. To test the function of these domains we modified the structure of CaPpz1 by in vitro mutagenesis. The two main domains were separated, four potential protein binding regions were deleted, and the myristoylation site as well as the active site of the enzyme was crippled by point mutations G2A and R262L, respectively. The in vitro phosphatase activity assay of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins indicated that the N-terminal domain was inactive, while the C-terminal domain became highly active against myosin light chain substrate. The deletion of the N-terminal 1–16 amino acids and the G2A mutation significantly decreased the specific activity of the enzyme. Complementation of the ppz1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutant strain with the different CaPpz1 forms demonstrated that the scission of the main domains, the two point mutations and the N-terminal 1–16 deletion rendered the phosphatase incompetent in the in vivo assays of LiCl tolerance and caffeine sensitivity. Thus our results confirmed the functional role of the N-terminal domain and highlighted the significance of the very N-terminal part of the protein in the regulation of CaPpz1.

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<![CDATA[Multi-study inference of regulatory networks for more accurate models of gene regulation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c536a85d5eed0c484a47592

Gene regulatory networks are composed of sub-networks that are often shared across biological processes, cell-types, and organisms. Leveraging multiple sources of information, such as publicly available gene expression datasets, could therefore be helpful when learning a network of interest. Integrating data across different studies, however, raises numerous technical concerns. Hence, a common approach in network inference, and broadly in genomics research, is to separately learn models from each dataset and combine the results. Individual models, however, often suffer from under-sampling, poor generalization and limited network recovery. In this study, we explore previous integration strategies, such as batch-correction and model ensembles, and introduce a new multitask learning approach for joint network inference across several datasets. Our method initially estimates the activities of transcription factors, and subsequently, infers the relevant network topology. As regulatory interactions are context-dependent, we estimate model coefficients as a combination of both dataset-specific and conserved components. In addition, adaptive penalties may be used to favor models that include interactions derived from multiple sources of prior knowledge including orthogonal genomics experiments. We evaluate generalization and network recovery using examples from Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and show that sharing information across models improves network reconstruction. Finally, we demonstrate robustness to both false positives in the prior information and heterogeneity among datasets.

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<![CDATA[Vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase is required for antifungal resistance and virulence of Candida glabrata]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c52186dd5eed0c4847982ae

Vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) is located in fungal vacuolar membranes. It is involved in multiple cellular processes, including the maintenance of intracellular ion homeostasis by maintaining acidic pH within the cell. The importance of V-ATPase in virulence has been demonstrated in several pathogenic fungi, including Candida albicans. However, it remains to be determined in the clinically important fungal pathogen Candida glabrata. Increasing multidrug resistance of C. glabrata is becoming a critical issue in the clinical setting. In the current study, we demonstrated that the plecomacrolide V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin B1 exerts a synergistic effect with azole antifungal agents, including fluconazole and voriconazole, against a C. glabrata wild-type strain. Furthermore, the deletion of the VPH2 gene encoding an assembly factor of V-ATPase was sufficient to interfere with V-ATPase function in C. glabrata, resulting in impaired pH homeostasis in the vacuole and increased sensitivity to a variety of environmental stresses, such as alkaline conditions (pH 7.4), ion stress (Na+, Ca2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ stress), exposure to the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 and antifungal agents (azoles and amphotericin B), and iron limitation. In addition, virulence of C. glabrata Δvph2 mutant in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis was reduced in comparison with that of the wild-type and VPH2-reconstituted strains. These findings support the notion that V-ATPase is a potential attractive target for the development of effective antifungal strategies.

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<![CDATA[Amino acid permeases in Cryptococcus neoformans are required for high temperature growth and virulence; and are regulated by Ras signaling]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c57e680d5eed0c484ef3481

Cryptococcosis is an Invasive Fungal Infection (IFI) caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, mainly in immunocompromised patients. Therapeutic failure due to pathogen drug resistance, treatment inconstancy and few antifungal options is a problem. The study of amino acid biosynthesis and uptake represents an opportunity to explore possible development of novel antifungals. C. neoformans has 10 amino acids permeases, two of them (Aap3 and Aap7) not expressed at the conditions tested, and five were studied previously (Aap2, Aap4, Aap5, Mup1 and Mup3). Our previous results showed that Aap4 and Aap5 are major permeases with overlapping functions. The aap4Δ/aap5Δ double mutant fails to grow in amino acids as sole nitrogen source and is avirulent in animal model. Here, we deleted the remaining amino acid permeases (AAP1, AAP6, AAP8) that showed gene expression modulation by nutritional condition and created a double mutant (aap1Δ/aap2Δ). We studied the virulence attributes of these mutants and explored the regulatory mechanism behind amino acid uptake in C. neoformans. The aap1Δ/aap2Δ strain had reduced growth at 37°C in L-amino acids, reduced capsule production and was hypovirulent in the Galleria mellonella animal model. Our data, along with previous studies, (i) complement the analysis for all 10 amino acid permeases mutants, (ii) corroborate the idea that these transporters behave as global permeases, (iii) are required during heat and nutritional stress, and (iv) are important for virulence. Our study also indicates a new possible link between Ras1 signaling and amino acids uptake.

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<![CDATA[Effect of Sec61 interaction with Mpd1 on endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c6448b0d5eed0c484c2eb9d

Proteins that misfold in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are transported back to the cytosol for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The Sec61 channel is one of the candidates for the retrograde transport conduit. Channel opening from the ER lumen must be triggered by ERAD factors and substrates. Here we aimed to identify new lumenal interaction partners of the Sec61 channel by chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry. In addition to known Sec61 interactors we detected ERAD factors including Cue1, Ubc6, Ubc7, Asi3, and Mpd1. We show that the CPY* ERAD factor Mpd1 binds to the lumenal Sec61 hinge region. Deletion of the Mpd1 binding site reduced the interaction between both proteins and caused an ERAD defect specific for CPY* without affecting protein import into the ER or ERAD of other substrates. Our data suggest that Mpd1 binding to Sec61 is a prerequisite for CPY* ERAD and confirm a role of Sec61 in ERAD of misfolded secretory proteins.

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<![CDATA[Impact of two neighbouring ribosomal protein clusters on biogenesis factor binding and assembly of yeast late small ribosomal subunit precursors]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c605a0bd5eed0c4847cc84c

Many of the small ribosomal subunit proteins are required for the stabilisation of late small ribosomal subunit (SSU) precursors and for final SSU rRNA processing in S. cerevisiae. Among them are ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) which form a protein cluster around rpS0 (uS2) at the "neck" of the SSU (S0-cluster) and others forming a nearby protein cluster around rpS3 (uS3) at the SSU "beak". Here we applied semi-quantitative proteomics together with complementary biochemical approaches to study how incomplete assembly of these two r-protein clusters affects binding and release of SSU maturation factors and assembly of other r-proteins in late SSU precursors in S. cerevisiae. For each of the two clusters specific impairment of the local r-protein assembly state was observed in Rio2 associated SSU precursors. Besides, cluster-specific effects on the association of biogenesis factors were detected. These suggested a role of S0-cluster formation for the efficient release of the two nuclear export factors Rrp12 and Slx9 from SSU precursors and for the correct incorporation of the late acting biogenesis factor Rio2. Based on our and on previous results we propose the existence of at least two different r-protein assembly checkpoints during late SSU maturation in S. cerevisiae. We discuss in the light of recent SSU precursor structure models how r-protein assembly states might be sensed by biogenesis factors at the S0-cluster checkpoint.

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<![CDATA[Triplet-pore structure of a highly divergent TOM complex of hydrogenosomes in Trichomonas vaginalis]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c390bb5d5eed0c48491df0f

Mitochondria originated from proteobacterial endosymbionts, and their transition to organelles was tightly linked to establishment of the protein import pathways. The initial import of most proteins is mediated by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM). Although TOM is common to all forms of mitochondria, an unexpected diversity of subunits between eukaryotic lineages has been predicted. However, experimental knowledge is limited to a few organisms, and so far, it remains unsettled whether the triplet-pore or the twin-pore structure is the generic form of TOM complex. Here, we analysed the TOM complex in hydrogenosomes, a metabolically specialised anaerobic form of mitochondria found in the excavate Trichomonas vaginalis. We demonstrate that the highly divergent β-barrel T. vaginalis TOM (TvTom)40-2 forms a translocation channel to conduct hydrogenosomal protein import. TvTom40-2 is present in high molecular weight complexes, and their analysis revealed the presence of four tail-anchored (TA) proteins. Two of them, Tom36 and Tom46, with heat shock protein (Hsp)20 and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, can bind hydrogenosomal preproteins and most likely function as receptors. A third subunit, Tom22-like protein, has a short cis domain and a conserved Tom22 transmembrane segment but lacks a trans domain. The fourth protein, hydrogenosomal outer membrane protein 19 (Homp19) has no known homology. Furthermore, our data indicate that TvTOM is associated with sorting and assembly machinery (Sam)50 that is involved in β-barrel assembly. Visualisation of TvTOM by electron microscopy revealed that it forms three pores and has an unconventional skull-like shape. Although TvTOM seems to lack Tom7, our phylogenetic profiling predicted Tom7 in free-living excavates. Collectively, our results suggest that the triplet-pore TOM complex, composed of three conserved subunits, was present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LECA), while receptors responsible for substrate binding evolved independently in different eukaryotic lineages.

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<![CDATA[Functional divergence of a global regulatory complex governing fungal filamentation]]> https://www.researchpad.co/article/5c3d00ebd5eed0c484036b17

Morphogenetic transitions are prevalent in the fungal kingdom. For a leading human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, the capacity to transition between yeast and filaments is key for virulence. For the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, filamentation enables nutrient acquisition. A recent functional genomic screen in S. cerevisiae identified Mfg1 as a regulator of morphogenesis that acts in complex with Flo8 and Mss11 to mediate transcriptional responses crucial for filamentation. In C. albicans, Mfg1 also interacts physically with Flo8 and Mss11 and is critical for filamentation in response to diverse cues, but the mechanisms through which it regulates morphogenesis remained elusive. Here, we explored the consequences of perturbation of Mfg1, Flo8, and Mss11 on C. albicans morphogenesis, and identified functional divergence of complex members. We observed that C. albicans Mss11 was dispensable for filamentation, and that overexpression of FLO8 caused constitutive filamentation even in the absence of Mfg1. Harnessing transcriptional profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to microarray analysis, we identified divergence between transcriptional targets of Flo8 and Mfg1 in C. albicans. We also established that Flo8 and Mfg1 cooperatively bind to promoters of key regulators of filamentation, including TEC1, for which overexpression was sufficient to restore filamentation in the absence of Flo8 or Mfg1. To further explore the circuitry through which Mfg1 regulates morphogenesis, we employed a novel strategy to select for mutations that restore filamentation in the absence of Mfg1. Whole genome sequencing of filamentation-competent mutants revealed chromosome 6 amplification as a conserved adaptive mechanism. A key determinant of the chromosome 6 amplification is FLO8, as deletion of one allele blocked morphogenesis, and chromosome 6 was not amplified in evolved lineages for which FLO8 was re-located to a different chromosome. Thus, this work highlights rewiring of key morphogenetic regulators over evolutionary time and aneuploidy as an adaptive mechanism driving fungal morphogenesis.

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